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Ptceee^in 



of the 



7 (nu- 7 outffc ClHHual (^oviOeniion 

of the 

Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor 




BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
AUGUST 7-11, 1939 



Picceeainas 



of the 



of the 

Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
AUGUST 7-11, 1939 



OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 

NICHOLAS P. MORRISSEY 

11 Beacon Street, Boston 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

DISTRICT 1 

JOHN J. BUCKLEY ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE 

81 Canal Street, Boston 43 Journal Building, Boston 

HARRY P. GRACES 

120 Boylston Street, Boston 

DISTRICT 2 

HORACE CARON HERBERT S. FERRIS 

116 Glasgow Street, Fall River 63 Main Street, Brockton 



DISTRICT 3 

EDWARD C. ENO TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL 

23 Fort Hill Avenue, Lowell 36 Oregon Avenue, Lawrence 



DISTRICT 4 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK CHARLES F. GRIFFIN 

SO Trumbull Street, Worcester 16 School Street, Fitchburg 

DISTRICT 5 

CHARLES E. CAFFREY BENJAMIN G. HULL 

21 Sanford Street, Springfield 14 High Street, Westfield 

SECRETARY-TREASURER-LEGISLATIVE AGENT 

KENNETH I. TAYLOR 
11 Beacon Street, Boston 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 
FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CONVENTION 

MONDAY, AUGUST 7, 1939 



The 54th annual convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor was opened at the Bradford 
Hotel, Boston, at 11:15 a. m. by 
Daniel J. Goggin, Chairman of the 
Committee on Arrangements, Boston 
Central Labor Union. 

Chairman Goggin addressed the con- 
vention as follows: 

As chairman of the Entertainment Com- 
mittee of the Boston Central Labor Union 
my duty is to provide entertainment for the 
visiting delegates. I want to welcome you 
to the City of Boston on behalf of the Bos- 
ton Central Labor Union. We are going 
to try and make your stay here as pleasant 
as any convention you have ever attended. 

In the absence of the President of the 
Boston Central Labor Union, it is my pleas- 
ure to introduce to you this morning, John 
J. Kearney, Vice-President and Chairman 
of the Boston Central Labor Union. Brother 
Kearney. 

Vice-President Kearney then ad- 
dressed the delegates, as follows: 

Brother Goggin, Reverend Father Hines, 
Acting Mayor Murray, President Morrissey 
and delegates — My duty here, too, will be as 
brief as I can make it. It has been cus- 
tomary in our conventions to open our ses- 
sions with prayer, invoking divine inspiration 
during our session, and it gives me consider- 
able pleasure, and I know it will you also, to 
know that the Reverend Father that I will 
introduce to you is a former member of the 
Bottlers and Drivers Union before entering 
the priesthood ; he is the son of one of our 
old and faithful members, Brother Michael 
Hines of the Bottlers and Drivers Union, 
and indeed it is a pleasure for us to hear 
from the Reverend Father George A. Hines. 

Father Hines delivered the following 
invocation: 

We have with us this morning a very dis- 
tinguished guest, one who is present at 
every gathering of men, although unseen and 
at times uninvited; unseen because He hides 
His divinity from the eyes of men, and un- 
invited because there are some who do not 
know that Almighty God is the author of 
all order and justice. It is His blessing that 
we seek this morning upon this convention 
and all its members, that all may work to- 
gether in perfect harmony, in christian char- 



ity, and that all may work to better the con- 
ditions of Labor and tlic laboring man : but 
always mindful of the presence of Him who 
sanctified Labor by becoming a carpenter's 
son. It is His hand that guides our every 
action, His divine mind that controls our 
every thought. He it is who is here this 
morning to bless the members and the work- 
ings of this convention through Christ, Our 
Lord, Amen. 

Vice-President Kearney then intro- 
duced Acting Mayor George Murray, as 
follows: 

In the absence of His Honor the Mayor 
who is visiting the birthplace of his parents 
with his dear mother, the City of Boston will 
be represented by the Acting Mayor, Presi- 
dent of the City Council. In the invocation. 
Father Hines mentioned the carpenter's son. 
I say Mayor Tobin, too, is the son of a 
carpenter who was one of the early pioneers 
in organizing the carpenters' union in the 
City of Boston and I feel that Mayor Tobin 
would have been pleased to address this 
gathering this morning. Instead, however, 
we have another good friend of our move- 
ment in the person of our Acting Mayor, 
who likewise, is a man of our labor move- 
ment, still continuing to pay his dues to the 
Railway Clerks Union, Local 144, and we are 
pleased to welcome a friend of ours in the 
person of Acting Mayor George Murray. 

Acting Mayor Murray spoke to the 
delegates, as follows: 

Mr. Chairman, Reverend Father and dele- 
gates of the State Federation of Labor — It cer- 
tainly is a real pleasure for me to come here 
in the absence of the Mayor. I know he 
feels real friendly toward Labor and I know 
Labor responds to that friendliness. I have 
been with him on several occasions when he 
said he had written to Labor and asked 
them to cooperate with him in some measures 
he was attempting to put across, and he said 
to me many, many times that he was pleased 
with the way Labor was so responsive to the 
things he was attempting to do in our city. 

He is a young man, and is fully appreci- 
ative of the problems that beset a body such 
as this and I know the delegates in and 
around Boston are pleased to cooperate with 
him. 

In looking around the hall I can see some 
of my constituents and also some men with 
whom I have the pleasure of being associated 
with in the same Local 144 of the Brother- 
hood of Railway Clerks. Thej* are here now 
as delegates representing that body along 
with otlier bodies that represent Labor 
throughout our city. 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



We in Boston are extremely glad that you 
have selected our city as the place wherein 
you are to hold your convention. We are 
attempting to bring in organizations such 
as this and other groups so that we can show 
them the most historical city in the land and 
also to stimulate business in Boston. We are 
very pleased that you have selected our city, 
and as Acting Mayor of Boston I bring to 
you the greetings of the people of our city 
and wish that this convention, when it 
terminates, will bring some worthwhile meas- 
ures so that those in public life might realize 
that Labor is still looking forward and up- 
ward. You and I know that Labor is en- 
titled to their hire. You and I know and 
feel that the worker is entitled to a day's pay 
for a day's work, and I am sure that the 
men in public life realize that more fully 
today than ever before in the history of our 
nation. 

I sincerely trust that your convention will 
be successful and want to thank you very 
kindly on behalf of the City of Boston for 
extending the invitation to us to come here 
and open this convention. Thank j^ou very 
kindly. 

Vice-President Kearney responded as 
follows, and then introduced President 
Nicholas P. Morrissey, to whom he 
turned over the gavel: 

We reciprocate your thanks, Mr. Mayor, 
for coming here this morning. 

The customary welcome by the Chief 
Executive of the Commonwealth of Ma,ssa- 
chusetts will be postponed until Tuesday at 
11 o'clock when I am informed His Excel- 
lency the Governor will appear to address the 
convention. 

Acting in the capacity of president of the 
Boston Central Labor Union, I desire to ex- 
tend the hand of welcome to the delegates. 
We are always pleased in Boston to have the 
conventions of the State Federation. Fifty- 
four years ago in the City of Boston the 
State Federation was formed and we in Bos- 
ton have watched with considerable pride the 
progress that the Federation has made since 
that time. 

The remarkable progress in the last three 
or four years indicates the lively interest 
taken in that progress by the representatives 
of the State Federation and we hope your 
convention will continue as it has always, 
with calm discussion, the absence of 
prejudice and personal illusions, and with 
careful study of the important problems that 
will come before you. We shall do all we 
can to make your stay as pleasant as pos- 
sible. We trust the important matters you 
will have before you during the coming days 
will help us all in the Commonwealth to 
realize that this gathering is composed of the 
leaders of Labor and it is to you that we 
look for inspiration and for guidance. 

I now turn over the convention to the 
President of the State Federation of Labor, 
Nicholas P. Morrissey. 

President Morrissey addressed the 
delegates, as follows: 

At this time, delegates to the 54th annual 
convention of the State Federation of Labor, 
I am going to depart from the usual pro- 
cedure due to the lateness of the hour. 
However, I want to thank the Very Reverend 
Father Hines ; I want to thank the repre- 
sentative of the Mayor, City Councillor 
Murray, and I want to thank the President 
of the Central Labor Union and the commit- 
tee of the Central Labor Union for the 



splendid arrangements that have been made 
and the welcome that has been extended 
here this morning to the delegates. 

It is customary for the presiding officer to 
amplify the written report. But as I have 
previously stated, due to the lateness of the 
hour, I am simply going to say that -the 
written report you have received speaks for 
itself. 

As you peruse the pages you will note that 
the Federation has reached its peak with re- 
spect to affiliations and finances. That is 
quite an achievement, in my opinion. You 
will find included in that report before you 
a brief and concise outline of the progress 
of your Federation since a year ago. 

Also within the report is a brief outline 
of the activities of the Federation with re- 
spect to the demonstration by the State Fed- 
eration of Labor in its attempt last fall to 
elect as Governor a man, who, in our opin- 
ion, possessed the best Labor record of those 
seeking that high office. 

I could consume much time, more than I 
deem advisable, discussing that fight which 
was so ably put on by the Federation. 

You will also -note that we were success- 
ful in our efforts to return several senators 
and representatives to their respective of- 
fices, despite what seemed to be inevitable 
defeat for them. The Council saw fit to go 
into the four corners of the state for those 
people in public life who demonstrated that 
they were friends of the _ working people of 
the Commonwealth. I think a great deal of 
attention should be paid in the future to the 
pedigree of the candidates seeking office. 
We come here seeking protection through 
legislation, not alone for members of the Fed- 
eration, but for all wage earners. We should 
carefully study the records of those who seek 
public office. 

I would like to read to you some of the 
words uttered 20 years ago by our revered 
President of the American Federation of 
Labor, the late Samuel Gompers. I quote : 

"Labor's partisanship in America has been 
to principles, not to parties or _ to men. 
Labor contends for certain definite funda- 
mental rights. These rights are essential 
rights that have to do with the daily lives 
of millions of people. But the safeguarding 
of these rights means safety for all people, 
opportunity for all, justice for all. The sun 
cannot shine for one or for a group ; the sun 
shines for all. Principles of liberty and jus- 
tice to which Labor contends are principles 
of liberty and justice for every American. 

"Labor cannot win rights for a few. It 
cannot cause the sun to shine upon a group. 
It must contend for fundamentals that _ apply 
to the whole people, and for those it can 
never cease contending. The interest of 
I.abor extends to every measure that has to 
do with human welfare. The reason for this 
is the simple reason that what is known as 
Labor is an aggregate of human beings. 
Labor is not something that is irnpersonal. 
It is not like a machine nor is it like a 
corporation. It is the sum total of the lives 
of all those who are useful to the world. 
Therefore, the interest of Labor in legislation 
is no limited interest falling between any two 
given points. It is an interest that completes 
the circle touching every thing that has to 
do with human relations. It is the duty of 
trade unionists, their friends, and sympa- 
thizers, and all lovers of freedom, justice and 
democratic ideals and institutions to unite 
in defeating those seeking public office who 
are indift'erent or hostile to the people's inter- 
ests and the aspirations of Labor." 

I know you appreciate my calling your 
attention to this brief but impressive state- 
ment of the political policies of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, and I hope that we 



[assaciiusetts Statp: Fedkration of IvAisor 



will continue in the future to keep plenty of, 
life within the ranks. From time to time 
you are going to lie furnished with the rer- 
orrls of tlie legislators serving on Beacon 
ITiil who seem to have a desire to vote in 
opposition to your bills which are introduced 
as a result of action taken at these con- 
ventions. 

President Morrissey then declared 
the 54th convention of the Massachu- 
setts State Federation of Labor in ses- 
sion and ready for the business to 
come before it. 

Secretary Taylor read the convention 
call: 



CONVENTION CALL 

Boston, June 1st, 1939. 

TO AFFILIATED UNIONS 
Circetings : 

The fifty-fourth annual convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor will 
convene on Monday, August 7th, 1939 at 
10:00 a. m. in the Hotel Bradford, Boston, 
and will remain in session until the business 
before the convention is completed. 

With the membership and affiliations in- 
creased to a point never before attained, this 
year's convention will doubtless be the larg- 
est ever held. It should be remembered that 
the delegates in attendance will decide upon 
important matters and will determine the 
policies and course which the officers for the 
forthcoming year will pursue. It is essential 
that every affiliated union be represented, re- 
gardless of size or location. 

Accordingly, the Executive Council earn- 
estly hopes that every eligible union will send 
representatives to the fifty-fourth annual con- 
vention. Each union should consider it a 
duty to have representatives of their choice 
participate in the annual convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor. 

REPRESENTATION 

Each Union of 200 members or less at- 
tached to a National or International Union, 
when one is in existence, shall be entitled to 
one delegate and an additional delegate for 
each 200 or a majority fraction thereof, and 
each Central Labor Union composed of miscel- 
laneous bodies shall be entitled to two dele- 
gates. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the Convention and their 
names and addresses forwarded to the Secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor. 

Organizations sending delegates must be 
paid up to and including the month of Tune, 
1939. 

Delegates representing Central Labor 
Unions must be members of local unions 
affiliated with the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

Your local union is entitled to 

delegates. 

CREDENTIALS 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated Unions. The duplicate creden- 
tial must be given to the delegate-elect and 
the original forwarded to Kenneth I. 
Taylor, Secretary-Treasurer, 11 Beacon 
Street, Boston, as early as possible. 



The f'ommittee on Credentials will meet 
at Ilcad(|uarters, Sunday, August 6, 1939 at 
|i, m. All delegates will appear before this 
Committee, and must have at least five 
Union Labels on their wearing apparel to be 
seated in the convention. 

RESOLUTIONS 

Section IV of Article TIF of the Consti- 
tution provides that: "I^ocal Unions and 
Central Labor Unions or delegates there- 
from, affiliated with this Federation, arc 
urgently requested to submit resolutions, 
amendments to the constitution, or griev- 
ances, so that they will he in the hands 
of the .Secretary-Treasurer- I^egislative Agent 
at least three days prior to opening of con- 
vention, that they may be considered by 
committees as per the constitution." 



Fraternally yours, 

NICHOLAS P. 



MORRISSEY, 



P 



sidcnt. 



District I 
WILLIAM T. DOYLE 
HARRY P. "GRACES 
MICHAEL J. O'HARE 

District II 
HORACE CARON 
HERBERT S. FERRIS 

District III 
CHARLES M. ERWIN 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL 

District I\^ 
CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK 
CHARLES F. GRIFFIN 

District V 
CHARLES E. CAFFREY 
BENJAMIN G. HULL 

Vice-Presidents. 

KENNETH I. TAYLOR 

Secretary- Treasurer. 

Conference of representatives of all Union 
Laljor crafts will be held on Monday, August 
7, 1939, at 7:00 p. m., at the Bradford Hotel. 
Boston. 

President Morrissey ordered the con- 
vention call to be incorporated in the 
minutes of the convention. 

Delegate McCall, for the Committee 
on Credentials, rendered the following 
report: 



ROLL CALL OF DELEGATES 
ARLINGTON 

CARPENTERS No. 831, 
Albert R. Klinger 

BEVERLY 

CARPENTERS No. 878. 
Edward Thompson 

BOSTON 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF AC- 
TORS, 

Thomas D. Senna 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF GOV- 
ERNMENT EMPLOYEES No. 82, 
John J. Larkin 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



AMERICAN FEDERATION OF GOV- 
ERNMENT EMPLOYEES No. 463, 

Herrick J. O'Gara 
ASBESTOS WORKERS No. 6, 

E. A. Johnson 

ATLANTIC FISHERMEN No. 21455, 

Patrick McHugh 

David G. Murphy 

Austin J. Powers 
BAKERS No. 45, 

Julius Brisgalsky 
BOILERMAKERS No. 29, 

Frank W. Lynch 
BOOKBINDERS No. 56, 

Mary G. Morley 
BOOKBINDERS No. 16, 

Frank H. Callahan 
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS "O", 

John J. Mara 

SOOT AND SHOE WORKERS No. 138, 
Daniel J. Goggin 
William Hartin 
John F. Mealey 

BOTTLERS AND DRIVERS No. 122, 
M. J. Hines 

BREWERY WORKERS No. 14, 
Arthur R. Weeber 

BREWERY WORKERS No. 29, 

Hugh J. Gildea 
BRICK AND CLAY WORKERS No. 572, 

Nelson H. Theriault 
BRICKLAYERS No. 8, 

Frank W. McCarthy 

Louis Sarno 
BRIDGE TENDERS No. 12333, 

Frank F. Morse 

BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
No. 30, 

Robert H. Everitt 

BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
No. 175, 

Thomas Lough ran 
CAFETERIA WORKERS No. 480, 

Saul Swartzman 
CARPENTERS No. 40, 

Peter A. Reilly 
CARPENTERS No. 51 

William J. Barry 

Frank J. Thorne 
CARPENTERS No. 2169, 

Patrick J. Sullivan 
CEMENT FINISHERS No. 534, 

John Carroll 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Thomas P. Burke 

Harry P. Grages 
COOKS AND PASTRY COOKS ASSO- 
CIATION No. 186, 

R. Forrest Moore 

Joseph Stefani 

COOPERS No. 89, 

James J. Doyle 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 103, 

Charles Buckley 

E. C. Carroll 

William J. Doyle 

James T. Kilroe 

William F. Sheehan 

ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 104, 
Edward J. Miller 

ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 717, 
Leo E. Mellyn 

ELECTROTYPERS No. 11, 
Martin J. Casey 

ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS No. 4, 
Edward I. Kelley 



ENGINEERS No. 4 (Hoisting and Port- 
able), 

James R. J. MacDonald 
John A. McWade 

ENGINEERS No. 849 (Stationary), 

Patrick J. McEntee 

Alva Richardson 

Harry A. Russell 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 14965, 

Aaron Velleman 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 20307, 

Edward A. Galvin 

FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 20588, 

Charles S. Bain 

Jack Rozzetti 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21056, 

Louis J. Blender 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21150, 

Arthur Wood 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21243, 

Thomas E. Chappie 

Thomas J. Lydon 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21432, 

Edward F. Sullivan 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21923, 

Walter D. Collins 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21962, 

Thomas Mercadante 
FIREMEN AND OILERS No. 3, 

David F. Looney 

John J. McNamara 
GLAZIERS No. 1044, 

John J. Geary 
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EMPLOY- 
EES No. 34, 

Thomas Boyle 

Patrick Conley 

John H. Daly 

John E. Finnigan 

Richard W. Garrity 

John C. Hurley 

John J. Kearney 

Albert C. Marr 

John Sargent 

Thomas J. Stewart 
HOTEL SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
No. 190. 

Michael J. Keenan 
IRON WORKERS No. 7, 

James A. McDonald 

William J. Reynolds 

LATHERS No. 72, 

Hubert Connor 

LAUNDRY WORKERS No. 66, 
Rose Norwood 
Helen Symanski 

MACHINISTS No. 264, 

John Clsvton 

Thomas Freeman 
MACHINISTS No. -SOI, 

George F. Piggott 
MACHINISTS No. 567. 

Joseph H. Curran 
MAILERS No. 16, 

William G. Harber 
MARBLE SETTERS AND TILE LAY- 
ERS HELPERS No. 18, 

James F. Meagher 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 396, 

Max Egbord 
MEAT CUTTERS No.- 592, 

John J. Conroy 

Dominick A. Grosse 

Edward T. Haley 

William j. Kelley 

James Martin 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 618, 

Max Hamlin 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



METAL POLISHERS No. 95, 

John J. Flynn 
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 182, 

James F. Burke 
MUSICIANS No. 9, 

Gustave F. Fischer 

George Gibbs 

Tames T. Kenney 

t. Edward Kurth 

Bert Nickerson 
NEWSPAPER PRESSMEN No. 3, 

John Hallisey 

George W. Lansing 

Edward T. Murray 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT MECHANICS 
No. 1373, 

John L. Dwyer 
PAINTERS No. 11, 

William Bjork 

Andrew Burt 

Michael Flaherty 
PAPER RULERS No. 13, 

Thomas Lynch 
PHOTO-ENGRAVERS No. 3, 

Thomas S. Madigan 

PLASTERERS No. 10, 

James A. Harding 
Francis O'Toole 

PLUMBERS No. 12, 

Timothy A. Callahan 

PRESS ASSISTANTS No. 18 
Walter F. McLoughlin 

PLATE BOYS, PAPER HANDLERS AND 
PRESS CLERKS No. 21, 

Anthony J. DeAndrade 

PRINTING PRESSMEN No. 67, 
Edward T. Gay 

RAILROAD CLERKS No. 143, 

Augustine F. Calnan 
RETAIL CIGAR CLERKS No. 874, 

John J. Donohue 

RETAIL CLERKS No. 796, 

Maud F. Van Vaerenewyck 

RETAIL CLERKS No. 1445, 
James G. Linehan 
John P. McCarthy 
Gerrit Oldenbrook 

RETAIL DRUG CLERKS No. 28, 
James A. Salterio 

ROOFERS UNION No. 33, 
Anthony Bush 

SEAFOOD WORKERS No. 1572-2, 
William Gallagher 
Leo Lenane 

SHEET METAL WORKERS No. 17, 
James E. Brooks 
Alfred Ellis, Jr. 
James T. Moriarty 

SIGN WRITERS No. 391, 
John MacG. Hogg 

SPRINKLER FITTERS AND HELPERS, 

Auxiliary No. 669, 

William Barnes 

STEAMFITTERS No. 537, 
John J. Allen 
Michael J. Holland 
Thomas F. Kelly 

STEREOTYPERS No. 2, 
George F. Doherty 

STONE CUTTERS, 

Nelson Mottola 



STREET CARMEN No. 589, 

Henry D. Bell 

Thomas W. Bowe 

John C. Carey 

John J. Cronin 

Patrick Donoghue 

Michael J. Flanagan 

Timothy J. Mahoney 

Matthew J. McLaughlin 

John H. McAnulty 

"Michael J. O'llare 

William A. Roche 

Frank L. Shaughnessy 

Michael J. Walsh 

Thomas F. Walsh 

Thomas F. Walsh 

Patrick J. White 
TEACHERS No. 441, 

James H. Sheldon 

TEAMSTERS No. 25, 
John J. Buckley 
Andrew D'Ambrosio 
Augustine E. Egan 
Timothy J. Harrington 
Nathan A. Higgins 
Frank J. Halloran 
Edward T. Jenkins 
Charles LaPlaca 
John Mahoney 
Nicholas P. Morrissey 
Michael Norton 
Michael J. O'Donnell 
John M. Sullivan 
"Robert W. Taylor 
Frank Tighe 

TEAMSTERS No. 68 (Coal and Fuel), 
John Barron 
Frank Cahalane 
John F. Donovan 
John J. Duffy 
George Gillen 
Martin J. Moran 
William Roper 
Michael J. Sullivan 

TEAMSTERS No. 82 (Furniture and 
Piano Movers), 

Charles A. Armstrong 

TEAMSTERS No. 168 (Laundry Drivers), 
N. Hurwitz 
P. II. Jennings 

TEAMSTERS No. 203 (Gas Station 
Attendants), 

James J. Mahoney 

TEAMSTERS No. 259 (Newspaper Chauf- 
fevirs), 

Charles Frasca 
Abraham Pearlstein 
Andrew M. Trainor 

TEAMSTERS No. 379 (Building Material), 
Charles A. Burns 
John J. Del Monte 

TEAMSTERS No. 380 (Milk Wagon 
Drivers), 

Thomas J. Burns 
Francis J. Corcoran 
Matthew" A. Dunn 
Mathew J. Maloney 
James L. Tierney 

TEAMSTERS No. 494 (Bakery Drivers). 
Walter L. Jensen 
Raymond T. McCall 
James J. Shea 
Augustine F. Walsh 
Michael F. Webb 

TEAMSTERS No. 496 (Taxi Cab Drivers), 
Theodore LaPlaca 
John J. Simpson 

TEAMSTERS No. 646 (Food Service Sales 
Drivers), 

Albert W. Fuchs 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



TEAMSTERS No. 831 (Carbonated Bev- 
erage and Lic|uor Salesmen), 

David Sandler 
TEAMSTERS No. 995 (Oil and Ice), 

Warren F. DeLeskey 

Henry E. Kelleher 
TELEPHONE OPERATORS No. B-1120, 

(irace Barry 

Anna L. O'Brien 
TERRAZO-MOSAIC WORKERS No. 23, 

Edmond Russell 
THEATRICAL SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
No. 124, 

Francis Nangle 
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES 
No. B-4, 

Walter H. Nolan 

THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES 
No. 11, 

James J. O'Brien 

TILE LAYERS No. 8, 

William Urbati 
TYPOGRAPHICAL No. 13, 

Thomas J. Gethins 

Dugald MacCallum 

T. Arthur Moriarty 

Thomas M. Nolan 

John F. Perkins 
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS No. 1, 

Nathan Sidd 
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS 
No. 163, 

Harry Feldman 

UNITED HATTERS, CAP AND MIL- 
LINERY WORKERS No. 65, 

Charles Morris 
WAITRESSES No. 112, 

Bessie C. Irving 

Eva M. Rankin 
WINDOW CLEANERS No. 86, 

John Costa 

BRAINTREE 

CARPENTERS No. 1550, 
John W. Knox; 

BROCKTON 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS No. 38, 

Daniel Harrington 

Bernard F. Smith 
CARPENTERS No. 624, 

Laurence Pratt 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Frank Motta 

James O'Connell 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 223, 

Herbert S. Ferris 
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EMPLOY- 
EES No. 161, 

Frank J. Dorgan 
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 437 

John L. Creed 
PAINTERS No. 296, 

Joseph A. Johnson 
STREET CARMEN No. 235, 

William O. McGowan 
TEAMSTERS No. 653, 

John B. Burgess 

Allen P. Nickerson 



BOOKBINDERS .No. 20i, 
John J. Barry 

CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Harry W. Joel 

Hovi'ard H. Litchfield 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21989, 

Russell E. McMakin 
TEACHERS No. 431, 

John H. Reynolds 

CHARLESTOWN 

MACHINISTS No. 634, 

Robert E. Meehan 

CHELSEA 

BARBERS No. 894, 

Frank Arcidiacono 

CHICOPEE 

BARTENDERS No. 116, 

John F. Lynch 
BREWERY WORKERS No. 141, 

Wesley O'Donnell 
FEDEHAL LABOR UNION No. 18518 

William Dynan 

Andrew C. Tilley 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 19469, 

Patrick J. Hassett 

DANVERS 

BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
No. 174, 

Albert H. Buckley 

EASTHAMPTON 

CARPENTERS No. 1372, 
Adam Kurtz 

FALL RIVER 

BARTENDERS No. 99, 

Michael J. Lyden 

James J. Mitchell 

BREWERY WORKERS No. 137, 

John McNerney 
BUILDING LABORERS No. 610, 

Manuel N. Medeiros 
CARPENTERS No. 1305, 

Horace Caron 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Edward Grimshaw 

William Reid 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 437, 

George H. Cottell 
HAT WORKERS No. 29, 

Ray Dooley 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 575, 

Michael J. Mahon 
PAINTERS No. 75, 

Louis DeG. Bernier 
PLUMBERS No. 135, 

Daniel J. McCarthy 
STREET CARMEN No. 174, 

Arthur T. Howard 

TEAMSTERS No. 526, 

Oswald F. Crockford 
Ernest Standring 

TYPOGRAPHICAL No. 161, 
Wright Turner 



CAMBRIDGE 

BAKERV WORKERS No. 348, 
Thomas F, Burns 
John Fitzpatrick 



FISHERVILLE 

FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21071, 
Joseph Legassey, Jr. 
Charles Scowcroft 



Massachusetts State Federation of IjAtjor 



FITCHBURG 

BARBERS No. 284, 

Thomas Chapman 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Elizabeth J. Ilanlcy 

Henry C. Mnriny 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21213, 

Eva Jeffrey 

PAPER MAKERS No. 12, 

Charles F. Grifilin 
PAPER MAKERS No. 373, 
Alfred Haase 

GLOUCESTER 

SEA FOOD WORKERS No. 15721, 
Claude F. Bocken 
Walter Cenerazzo 
John Curley 
J. Russell Martin 

GREENFIELD 

CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Carl Walz 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 761, 

John J. Regan 

HAVERHILL 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS No. 10, 

George T. Douglas 
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS No. 703, 

Florence C. Leonard 

Edward A. Roche 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Agnes Macintosh 

Albert F. Metwren 
COOKS AND WAITERS No. 201, 

John H. Gillis 
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 397, 

Edward M. Foley 
PAPER MAKERS No. 204, 

Paul Mikonis 
STREET CARMEN No. 503, 

Edward G. Sargent 
TEAMSTERS No. 437, 

Clarence E. Gendron 

HOLYOKE 

BARTENDERS No. 81, 

T. J. Durnin 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Urban Fleming 

Joseph L. Marion 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 707, 

Timothy F. Grady 
FIREMEN AND OILERS No. 4, 

Francis M. Curran 

LAWRENCE 

BARTENDERS No. 90, 

James H. Sullivan 
BREWERY WORKERS No. 119, 

John V. Janis 
BUILDING LABORERS No. 175, 

John A. Fusco 
CARPENTERS No. Ill, 

Matthew P. Maney 
CARPENTERS No. 551, 

Gedeon Champagne 
CARPENTERS No. 1092, 

James R. Menzie : 

CARPENTERS No. 1566, 

Fred J. Graham 



CENTRAL L.\l!OK UMOX, 
Timothv 1 1. O'Ncil 
John F. Wade 

ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 326, 
John F. O'Neill 

ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. B-lOOfi, 

Herbert L. Morris 
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EMPLOY- 
EES No. 319, 

Franklin J. Murphy 
PAINTERS No. 44, 

James P. Meehan 
POST OFFICE CLERKS No. 366. 

Henry L. Morency 
RETAIL CLERKS No. 232, 

A. Lonardo 
STREET CARMEN No. 261, 

John H. Leonard 
TEACHERS No. 244, 

Walter A. Sidley 
TEAMSTERS No. 477, 

Raymond V. Hill 
TEAMSTERS No. 686 fBakery Drivers), 

Emmett Cudahy 
TYPOGRAPHICAL No. 51, 

Leo F. McCarthy 

LEOMINSTER 

PAPER MAKERS No. 325, 
Thomas J. Condon 

LOWELL 

BARTENDERS No. 85, 

LIugh IMaguire 
CARPENTERS No. 49, 

Thomas J. Carlin 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

John H. f;riffith 

Sidney LeBow 

ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 588, 

Harold J. Wright 
ELECTRICAL No. B-1015, 

Edward C. Eno 
MACHINISTS No. 138, 

Ralph Frost 
MACHINISTS No. 319, 

Edward Blaha 

MOTOR COACH OPERATORS No. 280, 

Joseph H. Shea 

MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 546. 

Sidney C. Barton 

OPERATING ENGINEERS No. 352, 

Albra W. Hersome 
PRINTING PRESSMEN No. 109, 

Joseph A. Dart 
RETAIL CLERKS No. 372, 

Vincent S. Bagdonas 
TEAMSTERS No. 49, 

William F. Brooks 
TYPORGAPHICAL No. 310, 

J. J'rank Burke 

LYNN 

BAKERY WORKERS No. 1S2, 

John Cameron 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Leo Barber 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 71, 

George Callahan 

John J. Driscoll 

John Kemp 
MOTOR COACH OPERATORS No. 240, 

Grahame C. Malloch 



10 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 245, 

Harold E. Hunt 

RETAIL CLERKS No. 1435, 

Otis Smith 
STREET CARMEN No. 238, 

Charles T. Buchanan 

TEAMSTERS No. 42, 

William H. Davis 
Lester D. Hennessey 
William A. Nealey 

MALDEN 

FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 20567, 
Bella Black 
Anna Cristiano 
Frank Miceli 
Lucy Villiotti 

METHUEN 

CARPENTERS No. 1215, 
John J. Mulcahy 

MILFORD 

BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS No. 40, 
John F. Reardon 

NATICK 

PAINTERS No. 916, 

Stephen J. Angleton 

NEW BEDFORD 

BARBERS No. 447, 

Sylvio H. Leblanc 
CARPENTERS No. 1416, 

Henry H. Bowles 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Dorothy B. DeLoid 

Frederick W. Ringdahl 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 234, 

Joseph Guilbrault 
ENGINEERS No. 471 (Stationary), 

Michael R. Gomes 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 609, 

Herbert A. Lee 
SEAFOOD WORKERS No. 1573, 

John W. Lind 

James J. O'Malley 
TEACHERS No. 263, 

John D. Connors 
TEAiMSTERS No. 59, 

S. P. Jason 

Manuel Souza 

NEWTON 

CARPENTERS No. 275, 
Angus MacLean 

NORTH ADAMS 

BARTENDERS No. 125, 

Cornelius E. O'lJrien 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Francis L. Bowes 

John F. Smith 

NORTHAMPTON 

CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Mrs. Alice A. Lazerowitz 

TEACHERS No. 230, 

Hanna F. Faterson 

NORTHBRIDGE 

PAPER MAKERS No. 190, 
Albert Longton 



NORWOOD 

BOOKBINDERS No. 176, 

John Connolly 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Daniel J. Collins 

Daniel E. Duane 

QUINCY 

CARPENTERS No. 762, 

George A. Oster 
GRANITE CUTTERS, 

Costanzo Pagnano 
RETAIL CLERKS No. 224. 

J. Girard White 
STREET CARMEN No. 253, 

Robert J. Egan 

SALEM 

ENGINEERS No. 93 (Stationary). 

Patrick J. Higgins 
STREET CARMEN No. 246, 

Francis M. Griffin 

SOMERVILLE 

CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Robert F. Maguire 

Frank Mangan 
TEAMSTERS No. 829 (Warehousemen), 

Frank J. Buckley 

Maurice Enwright 

James Maher 

James P. McCarthy 

Jeremiah F. McCarthy 

Jerome McCarthy 

George J. Norton 

Thomas Powers 

George E. Stack 

Eva Vinet 

SPRINGFIELD 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF GOV- 
ERNMENT EMPLOYEES No. 178, 
John B. Murray 
BAKERY WORKERS No. 32, 
Eugene Pasini 

BARBERS No. 30, 

Arthur F. Caron 

BARTENDERS No. 67, 

John D. Dahner 
BRICKLAYERS No. 1, 

Patrick W. Harrigan 
CARPENTERS No. 177, 

Patrick T. Garvey 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Charles E. Cafirey 

Harry P. Hogan 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 7, 

Walter J. Kenefick 
ENGINEERS No. 602, 

Andrew F. Sheehan 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 20681, 

William Johnston 

John J. Kiely 
FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 20756, 

Harry E. Dearborn 
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 186, 

Arthur J. Payette 
PAINTERS No. 257, 

A. Marecoux 
PATTERN MAKERS, 

Finton J. Kelly 
PLUMBERS No. 89, 

David A. Goggin 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



11 



POST OFFICE CLERKS No. 497, 

James E. Walsh 
PRINTING PRESSMEN No. 85. 

Edward M. Sweeney 
STREET CARMEN No. 448, 

E. A. Raleigh 
TAILORS No. 153, 

James Hyde 
TEAMSTERS No. 404, 

Edward A. Clampit 

Thomas J. Corcoran 

B. E. Naylor 
TYPOGRAPHICAL No. 216, 

Kenneth I. Taylor 
WAITRESSES No. 83, 

Marion Macey 

TAUNTON 

ENAMEL WORKERS No. 103. 

George Dooley 
MEAT CUTTERS No. 214, 

Philip J. Guest 

WALTHAM 

LATHERS No. 142, 

Frank C. Burke, 
STREET CARMEN No. 600, 

William T. Egan 

WATERTOWN 

FEDERAL LABOR UNION No. 21903. 

Stephen D. Kovar 
MACHINISTS No. 150. 

John F. Malone 

WESTFIELD 

BICYCLE WORKERS No. 20291, 

Francis T. Reardon 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION. 

Benjamin G. Hull 

WORCESTER 

BAKERS No. 133, 

Isaac A. Cohen 
BAKERY WORKERS No. 380, 

Robert K. Crabbe 

BARTENDERS No. 95, 

James H. Loughlin 
BREWERY WORKERS No. 136, 

James Cronin 
BRICKLAYERS No. 6, 

John J. Murphy 
BUILDING. LABORERS No. 243, 

Daniel Murphy 
CENTRAL LABOR UNION, 

Thomas F. Conroy 

Philip F. Coyle 
ELECTRICAL WORKERS No. 96, 

Samuel J. Donnelly 
MOLDERS No. 5, 

William H. Thornton 
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS 
No. 96, 

John E. Hauser 
MUSICIANS No. 143, 

Walter Hazelhurst 
OPERATING ENGINEERS No. 75, 

Robert A. Burns 
PAINTERS No. 48, 

Patrick J. Begney 
PRINTING PRESSMEN No. 29, 

Cyril Rogiers 



STREET CARMEN No. 22, 

Laurence J. Hannon 

John M. Shea 
TEAMSTERS No. 170, 

Chester G. Fitzpatrick 

Leonard A. Ryan 
TYPOGRAPHICAL No. 165, 

Freeman M. Saltus 

FRATERNAL DELEGATES 

WOMEN'S TRADE UNION LEAGUE, 
BOSTON, 

Mary Gordon Thompson 
WOMEN'S TRADE UNION LEAGUE, 
WORCESTER, 

Cecelia Nicholson 

Delegate McCall moved the report of 
the committee be adopted and that the 
delegates be seated with voice and vote. 

The motion was adopted. 

President Morrissey then adminis- 
tered the oath to the delegates, to wit: 

I, (delegate's name) of (name of organiza- 
tion) of (city or town), promise to use all 
possible efifort and to ask cooperation of 
fellow members and others to purchase and 
promate use of goods bearing union labels, 
cards, buttons or other insignia showing they 
are produced under conditions satisfactory to 
members of unions affiliated with the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. 

President Morrissey appointed the 
following committees: 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS 

TIMOTHY F. GRADY, Electrical Workers 

No. 707, Holyoke 
RAYMOND T. McCALL, Bakery Drivers No. 

494, Boston 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 1215, 

Methuen 
JOHN J. CRONIN, Street Carmen No. 589, 

Boston 
JAMES J. MITCHELL, Bartenders No. 99, 

Fall River 

COMMITTEE ON RULES 

FRANK L. SHAUGHNESSY, Street Carmen 

No. 589, Boston 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JAMES J. O'MiALLEY, Sea Food Workers No. 

1572, New Bedford 
THOMAS J. DURNIN, Bartenders No. 81, 

Holyoke 
ROBERT A. BURNS, Engineers No. 75. 

Worcester 
JOHN M. SHEA, Street Carmen No. 22. 

Worcester 
EDWARD C. CARROLL, Electrical Workers 

No. 103, Boston 
THOMAS J. GETHINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
RAY DOOLEY, United Hatters No. 29, Fall 

River 
JOHN D. CONNORS, Teachers No. 263, 

New Bedford 
WILLIAM F. BROOKS, Teamsters No. 49, 

Lowell 
EDWARD M. FOLEY, Moving Picture Op- 
erators No. 397, Haverhill 
PATRICK W. HARRIGAN. Bricklayers No. 

1. Springfield 
JAMES O'CONNELL, Central Labor Union, 

Brockton 
BENJAMIN E. NAYLOR, Teamsters No. 404 



12 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



COMMITTEE ON OFFICERS' REPORTS 

AARON VELLEMAN, Stenographers No. 

14965, Boston 
JAMES J. O'BRIEN, Stage Employees No. 

11, Boston 
BERNARD F. SMITH, Boot and Shoe 

Workers No. 38, Brockton 
FRANCIS J. HALLORAN, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 
MATTHEW J. McLaughlin, street Car- 
men No. 589, Boston 
GEORGE T. DOUGLAS, Boot and Shoe No. 

1-0 Haverhill 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 11, 

Boston 
LAURENCE E. PRATT, Carpenters No. 624, 

Brockton 
E. A. JOHNSON, Asbestos Workers No. 6, 

Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers and Press Clerks Noi 21, 
Boston 
AUGUSTINE F. WALSH, Bakery Drivers 

No. 494, Boston 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, Law- 
rence 
JOHN McNAMARA, Firemen and Oilers No. 

3, Boston 
ARTHUR J. PAYETTE, Moving Picture Op- 
erators No. 186, Springfield 
HOWARD H. LITCHFIELD, Central Labor 
Union, Cambridge 



COMMITTEE ON REPORT OF SECRE- 
TARY-TREASURER-LEGISLATIVE 
AGENT 

ABRAHAM PEARLSTEIN, Newspaper Chauf- 
feurs No. 259, Boston 

SIDNEY LeBOW, Moving Picture Operators 
No. 546, Lowell 

JOHN CAREY, Street Carmen No. 589, Bos- 
ton 

FRANCIS F. MORSE, Bridge Tenders No. 
12333, Boston 

WALTER HAZELHURST, Musicians No. 
143, Worcester 

JAMES E. WALSH, Post Office Clerks No. 
497, Springfield 

JOHN BUCKLEY, Teamsters No. 25, Boston 

MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, Bos- 
ton 

WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN, Electrical Workers 
No. 103, Boston 

JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 13, 
Boston 

J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 310, 
Lowell 

GEORGE GIBBS, Musicians No. 9, Boston 

FRANK MANGAN, Central Labor Union, 
Somerville 

GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper Pressmen 
No. 3, Boston 

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 
HARRY A. RUSSELL, Engineers No. 849, 

Boston 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
MICHAEL WALSH, Street Carmen No. 589, 

Boston 
SAMUEL J. DONNELLY, Electrical Work- 
ers No. 96, Worcester 
DANIEL J. GOGGIN, Boot and Shoe Workers 

No. 138, Boston 
ALFRED ELLIS, Sheet Metal Workers No. 

17, Boston 
EDWARD C. ENO, Central Labor Union, 

Lowell 
JAMES P. MEEHAN, Painters No. 44, 

Lawrence 
JOHN M. SULLIVAN, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 



V^tI^Fx J'^'^^^?' C"^""''' Labor Union, Lynn 

-MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL, Teamsters No. 
2o, Boston 

JOHN J CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 
176, PMorwood 

JOHN CLAYTON, Machinists No. 264, Bos- 
ton 

CHARLES BURNS, Teamsters No. 379, Bos- 
ton 

COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTION 



JOHN J. KEARNEY, Hotel and Restaurant 

Employers No. 34, Boston 
FRANCIS O'TOOLE, Plasterers No. 10, 

Boston 
JOHN McANULTY, Street Carmen No. 589, 

Boston 
JOHN J. DRISCOLL, Meat Cutters No. 71, 

Lynn 
FREEMAN M. SALTUS, Typographical No. 

165, Worcester 
EDWARD I. KELLEY, Elevator Construc- 
tors No. 4, Boston 
THOMAS CHAPMAN, Barbers No. 284, 

Fitchburg 
S. P. JASON, Teamsters No. 59, New Bed- 
ford 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers No. 

326, Lawrence 
DAVID A. GOGGIN, Plumbers No. 89, 

Springfield 
FRANCIS L. BOWES, Central Labor Union, 

North Adams 
FRED J. GRAHAM, Carpenters No. 1566, 

Lawrence 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry Cooks 

No. 186, Boston 
PHILIP F. COYLE, Central Labor Union, 

Worcester 
JOHN W. LIND, Seafood Workers No. 1572, 

New Bedford 

COMMITTEE ON GRIEVANCES 

JAMES R. J. MacDONALD, Hoisting and 

Portable Engineers No. 4, Boston 
JOHN J. DelMONTE, Teamsters No. 379, 

Boston 
ARTHUR R. WEEBER, Brewery Workers 

No. 14, Boston 
NELSON H. THERIAULT, Brick and Clay 

Workers, No. 572, Boston 
THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo-Engravers 

No. 3, Boston 
WILLIAM DYNAN, Federal Labor Union 

No. 18518, Chicopee 
GEORGE DOOLEY, Enamel Workers, No. 

103, Taunton 
ARTHUR F. CARON, Barbers No. 30, 

Springfield 
URBAN FLEMING, Central Labor Union, 

Holyoke 
PATRICK McHUGH, Atlantic Fishermen No. 

21455, Boston 
OSWALD CROCKFORD, Teamsters No. 526, 

Fall River 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 244, 

Lawrence 
THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
MICHAEL R. GOMES, Engineers. No. 471, 

New Bedford 
JOHN CAMERON, Bakery Workers, No. 
182, Lynn 

COMMITTEE ON UNION LABELS, 
BUTTONS AND SHOP CARDS 

NATHAN SIDD, United Garment Workers 
No. 1, Boston 

EVA M. RANKIN, Waitresses No. 112, Bos- 
ton 

DANIEL HARRINGTON, Boot and Shoe 
Workers No. 38, Brockton 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



l.'i 



ROSE NORWOOD, l.nnndry Workers No. dfi, 

Boston 
JOHN F. LYNCH, Bartenders No. 110, 

Chicopee 
JOHN F. REARDON, Boot and Shoe Workers 

No. 40, Milford 
ALBERT LONGTON, New Deal Paper 

Makers No. 190, Northbridge 
MICHAEL J. HINES, Bottlers and Drivers 

No. 122, Boston 
FRANCIS T. REARDON, Bicycle Workers 

No. 20291, VVestfield 
NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Drivers No. 

168, Boston 
HUGH F. MAGUIRE, Bartenders No. 8.5, 

Lowell 
THOMAS LYDON, Federal Labor Union No. 

21243, Boston 
TAMES T. DOYLE, Coopers No. 89, Boston 
CHARLES MORRIS, United Hatters, Cap 

and Millinery Workers No. 6.5, Boston 
HUGH KELLEHER, Boot and Shoe Workers 

No. 703, Haverhill 
MAUD F. VAN VAERENEWYCK. Retail 

Clerks, No. 796, Boston 



COMMITTEE ON GUESTS 

P. HARRY JENNINGS, Laundry Drivers No. 

168, Boston 
JOHN C. HURLEY, Hotel and Restaurant 

Employees No. 34, Boston 
WALTER J. KENEFICK, Electrical Workers 

No. 7, Springfield 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. Ill, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT F. MiAGUIRE, Central Labor 

LTnion, Somerville 



SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

MICHAEL J. NORTON, Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston 



ASSISTANT SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 1092. 
Lawrence 



Secretary Taylor read the following 
communications and telegrams: 



August 5, 1939 

Kenneth I. Taylor 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 

11 Beacon Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 

My dear Mr. Taylor: 

I have had your convention very much in 
mind and I am, therefore, sorry indeed to be 
forced to write to you that I shall not be 
able to be present. Announcement has been 
made here that it is planned to hold meet- 
ings of a recess committee, of which I am 
a member, while the members are still in 
Washington. As the subject matter — unem- 
ployment and relief — is of the utmost impor- 
tance I feel I must hold myself available for 
this work. 

Please express my regrets to all those 
present together with my best wishes for a 
very successful year. 

With best wishes, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

H. C. LODGE, Jr. 



New York, N. Y. 

August 7, 1939 
.Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Convention Headquarters, Hotel Bradford 
iioston, Massachusetts 

Fraternal greetings and best wishes for a 
harmonious and successful convention. 

UNITED GARMENT WORKERS 
OF AMERICA, 

T. A. Rickert, General President. 



Hollywood, California 

August 6, 1939 
Kenneth I. Taylor 
Secretary- Treasurer 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Convention Hall, Hotel Bradford 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Sincere greetings to the 54th annual con- 
vention from one who chalks up his first 
absence in 18 years. Doomed to linger longer 
within the boundaries of synthetic California, 
where on occasional days the fiery sun leaks 
through the murky mists of a dubious day- 
light and where the words douVjlecross, 
phoney and phooey have a deep and unusual 
significance, I most keenly regret the lack 
of opportunity to absorb anew the inspira- 
tion and faith which I have always drawn 
from our annual conventions. Indeed it is 
entirely a fact that within this Chamber of 
Commerce, over-exploited piece of God's foot- 
stool even Nature delivers a phoney produce. 
Fruits have no fruity flavor, vegetables are 
flat and tasteless, flowers bloom without 
fragrance, and even the trees are brought 
into the territory from other and more fer- 
tile areas. So what can you expect of the 
people. Most truly they live up to the foun- 
dation nature has prepared for them. Com- 
munism is rampant ; C. I. O. is an honored 
guest and cockeyed schemes and panaceas 
take root and flourish with a psychopathic 
disregard for all realities. I wish I were 
present to relate to you how I have become 
permanently cured from any desire to have 
election of judges in our wonderful state. 
Were I to ramble on in this expensive man- 
ner I might have to return home on a self- 
propelled bicycle. Suflicient to say in con- 
clusion that you have to wander far afield 
to really appreciate the honesty, sincerity 
and wholesome frankness which permeates 
the motives and actions of our own Massa- 
chusetts leaders of Labor and indeed the 
civic virtues of most of our political heroes. 
My best wishes for a fruitful and harmonious 
convention. 

TOHN F. GATELEE. 



Secretary Taylor announced that the 
deadline for filing resolutions was 
Tuesday at 5:00 p. m., and that all 
resolutions filed would be printed in 
pamphlet form and distributed to the 
delegates by Wednesday. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) after being granted the 
floor, announced that House Bill No. 
2234 was before the Senate for a third 
reading, which was a bill to create fair 
competition among bidders for .ion- 
tracts for construction, reconstruction, 
repairing and remodeling on public 



14 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



works. He advised that a hostile 
amendment had been introduced which 
would be harmful to the bill and urged 
all delegates, particularly building 
tradesmen, to contact their senators and 
request that they vote for House Bill 
No. 2234, and against the amendment. 

The convention then adjourned until 
2:00 p. m. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Monday afternoon at 2:00 p. m. by 
President Morrissey. 

President Morrissey introduced Ray 
C. Kirkpatrick, Assistant on Labor Rela- 
tions, Public Works Administration, 
Federal Works Agency, who addressed 
the convention as follows: 

Mr. President, Mr. Secretary, ladies and 
gentlemen — It is a distinct pleasure to be 
with you as the Assistant on Labor Relations 
fepresenting the Public Works Administra- 
tion. I am always stimulated and edified in 
associating with a representative body of this 
nature. 

Evolution along the broad Labor front in 
the past few years has been so rapid and 
replete with newsworthy incidents that the 
superficial observer becomes confused and 
loses sight of the true movement in the 
maze of daily occurrences. Yet, by assum- 
ing a broad perspective, and observing care- 
fully, it is possible to identify basic forces 
and observe the resulting trends of Labor. 
It is with respect to one of these forces and 
its effect upon the movement that I address 
you for a few moments today. I wish to 
direct your attention to the change in gov- 
ernment attitude toward Labor and flie re- 
sulting opportunities with responsibilities 
devolving upon the movement in consequence 
thereof. 

It is interesting to note that as late as 
1820, even after the labor problem as we 
know it, had resulted from the unification 
and classifications following the advent of 
the factory system, that the efi'orts of courts 
and legislatures appear to have been directed 
not only to the curbing but to the crushing 
of etiforts to organize for self-betterment. 
Any meeting or organizing for this purpose 
was punished as criminal conspiracy. Our 
early American court decisions declared with 
untroubled simplicity that "a combination of 
workmen to raise their wages may be con- 
sidered from a two-fold point of view. One 
is to_ benefit themselves . . . the other is 
to injure those who do not join their society. 
The rule of law condemns both." Not until 
the "Combination Act" of 1824 was Labor 
permitted to meet peacefully together "to 
consult upon and determine" rates of pay, 
wages, etc., and not until 1840 did the court 
through Chief Justice .Shaw of the Massa- 
chusetts Supreme Court establish the right 
to strike declaring that unions per se were 
not illegal and that "the legality of such 
association will, therefore, depend upon the 
means used for its accomplishment." 

Even this gain was dealt a serious blow 
when, following the great railroad strike of 
1877, the labor injunction was born, the 
court in Sherry vs Perkins deeming the 
expediency of the moment and the preven- 



tion of irreparable injury as justification for 
enjoining a union "from displaying banners 
\yith devices as a means of threat and in- 
timidation to other employees." The use of 
this new anti-union weapon grew rapidly 
resulting too frequently in the abuse of the 
measure exemplified by the instance, when 
in 1893, a circuit court of the United States 
actually enjoined certain employees of rail- 
roads "from combining and conspiring to 
quit without notice." Although this severe 
decision was reversed by the court of appeals 
it indicates a somewhat representative view 
held by the courts and legislatures of the 
period. 

From this extreme, however, the trend of 
popular concepts moved in a liberal direc- 
tion, and measures for the protection of 
Labor were taken in all branches of the 
government. In 1898 Congress passed the 
Erdman Act declaring the use of yellow-dog 
contracts punishable by fine and imprison- 
ment when used in connection with railroads. 
Although this and similar measures were for 
a period ham-strung by restrictive interpre- 
tations of the courts. Congress had become 
labor conscious and in this same year ap- 
pointed an industrial commission to inves- 
tigate and report on questions pertaining to 
immigration, labor, agriculture, manufactur- 
ing and business. The commission employed 
27 experts and examined 700 witnesses. The 
report to Congress stated that "... it is 
quite generally recognized that the growth 
of great aggregations of capital under the 
control of groups of men which is so promi- 
nent a feature of economic development of 
recent years, necessitates a corresponding 
aggregation of working men with unions 
which may be able to act as units .... 
The tendency toward unified control of capital 
and business has intensified without changing 
the disadvantages of the wage worker and 
his dealings with employers. The compe- 
tition for work is normally far sharper than 
the competition for workmen. If the work- 
ing people . . . are prevented from intro- 
ducing an arrangement of democracy into 
industrjal life by way of labor organizations, 
they will undertake to introduce it in another 
way. 

"The seller of labor is worse off in several 
respects than the seller of almost any physical 
product. His commodity is in the highest 
degree perishable. That which is not sold 
today disappears absolutely. Moreover, in 
the majority of cases the workman is de- 
pendent upon the sale of his labor for his 
support. If he refuses an offer the ne.xt 
comer will probably accept it and he is 
likely to be left destitute .... Considered 
merely as a bargainer, as an actual partici- 
pant in the operation of the market, the 
working man is almost always at a grave dis- 
advantage as compared with the employer." 
Based upon this appreciation of the 
necessity for collective bargaining in order 
that employer and employee may participate 
in solving their mutual problems to their 
mutual benefits, the government has, particu- 
larly in recent years, taken steps to insure 
the security of national labor rights. This 
is exemplified in the enactment of the NIRA 
with its Section 7a, the Guffey Coal Act, 
the Norris-LaGuardia Act, the 1934 amend- 
ments of the Railway Labor Act and othet 
legislation of this type. 

It is, of course, fully appreciated the part 
labor organizations such as this State Federa- 
tion have played in bringing about this legis- 
lative and popular labor education and for 
these efforts I sincerely commend you. 

The attitude toward Labor adopted by 
various government agencies in recent years 
further indicates an appreciation of the 
manual worker in our national lives. I am 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



15 



proud to be able to exemplify this by review- 
ing with you an outline of this class of 
provisions in the organization I represent. 
In all contracts under the supervision of the 
Public Works Administration, it is required: 

1. That contract minimum rates be 
determined in accordance with rates 
prevailing in the locality in which the 
project is to be constructed. 

2. That all employees engaged 
in work on the project shall have the 
right to organize and bargain collec- 
tively through representatives of their 
own choosing, and that such employ- 
ees shall be free from interference, re- 
straint, and coercion of employers in 
the designation of such employee's 
representatives, in self-organization, 
and in other concerted activities of 
such employees, for the purpose of 
collective bargaining or other mutual 
aid or protection, and that no person 
seeking employment on the project 
and no person employed thereon shall 
be required as a condition of initial 
or continued employment to join any 
company union or to refrain from 
joining, organizing, or assisting a 
labor organization of such person's 
own choosing. 

3. That no person under the age 
of 16 years, no convict labor and no 
person whose age or physical condi- 
tion is such as to make his employ- 
ment dangerous to health and safety 
may be employed, although physically 
handicapped persons who are other- 
wise employable are not thus affected. 

4. That there be no discrimination 
because of race, creed, color or 
political affiliation. 

5. That workers be not permitted 
to work more than 8 hours per day 
or more than 40 hours per week, 
except in cases of emergency. 

6. That definite measures for the 
safety of employees be taken and 
that the employer insure the work- 
men against accidents and death. 

An adequate inspection force is provided 
to insure compliance with these and similar 
requirements. 

There are none of you here who have not 
personally experienced the benefits of public 
works built under these conditions. Since 
1933, 635 of our projects have been or are 
being constructed in Massachusetts at a cost 
of $176,727,118. You have benefited directly 
not only through employment and wages but 
through receiving the advantages of some 272 
educational buildings, 252 sewers, waterworks 
and power systems, 40 hospitals, 86 street 
and highway units, and a great number of 
other socially valuable projects. Every county 
in the state has received direct stimulus 
through this program performed under de- 
sirable working conditions. 

The few misunderstandings there may have 
been between you and the PWA have been 
of little consequence. Our relationship has 
been essentially one of harmony, and in that 
harmony has been found progress and ac- 
complishment. 

On July 1, 1939, the Public Works Ad- 
ministration became part of the Federal 
Works Agency under the direction of John M. 
Carmody. Although the organizations of the 
various units thus assembled will be essen- 
tially maintained, it is expected that through 
centralized direction common policies may 
be assumed towards Labor so far as the en- 
abling legislation permits. 

In consequence of the existing recognition 
of Labor as a class there follows inevitably 
the responsibility of fulfilling satisfactorily 



your prescribed place in our national life. It 
IS necessary, as you continue efforts of self- 
betterment as a class, that you remain con- 
scious of national welfare. Modern means of 
communication are daily binding us into a 
firmer federalized unit. We must fully appre- 
ciate that no one portion of our social life 
can long prosper at- the expense of the other. 
To this end Labor must remain fixed to its 
present broad aims based upon concepts of 
general betterment. Labor must remain 
democratic, for only thus can it retain the 
national respect and support essential for its 
continued welfare. 

In conclusion let me assure you of the 
appreciation of the Public Works Adminis- 
tration for your wholehearted cooperation 
and assistance in carrying out the program 
that has been our responsibility. Feel per- 
fectly free to call upon either Mr. A. W. 
Soine, our Regional Labor Advisor in New 
York, or my office in Washington, for any 
service in our power to render. Allow me 
again to thank you for this opportunity and 
to express my hope that we may continue 
our very pleasant association. I thank you. 

President Morrissey then presented 
John Pearson, Regional Director of the 
Social Security Board, who addressed 
the convention, as follows: 

Mr. President and delegates — May I first 
acknowledge appreciation of the generous time 
you have given the representatives of the Social 
Security Board during the past four years. 
This happens to be the fourth convention of the 
State Federation which a representative of the 
Social Security Board has briefly addressed. I 
know you will have a good many speakers dur- 
ing the week and I will not take up too much 
of your time. 

There have been some changes made in the 
Social Security Act which I want to briefly 
mention as I do not think their significance is 
very widely understood. I would like to say 
that in the administration of the Social Security 
Act we have two kinds of problems, one is the 
administration of old age insurance, and the 
other carrying on federal and state relation- 
ships, which are legislated under the Social 
Security Act. This represents a lot of ex- 
perimentation and pioneering, and some of the 
principles are not too clearly understood. As far 
as New England is concerned, we have tried 
to observe the prerogatives of the legislatures 
in establishing regulations under which legisla- 
tion is negotiated and also that the responsi- 
h'l'ty for the selecting of the state personnel 
is with the state. 

To take up the question of old age insurance, 
the extension put through last Saturday by the 
Senate, a reference in the Boston Globe of 
this morning brings it out very clearly and I 
want to read it. 

Liberalized Pensions 

"Passed in the closing minutes of the ses- 
sion, the action of Congress in liberalizing the 
provis'ons of the Old Age Pension was al- 
most lost from public notice in the hurly- 
burly accompanying adjournment. Yet 
when all else has been said the fact remains 
that nothing done by Congress this year will 
afifect more American citizens than the 
changes it made at the last minute in the 
Social Security Act. 

"Both old-age pensions and old-age assist- 
•nnce have been liberalized. The two should 
not be confused. Old-age assistance is a 
monthly allowance paid in equal shares by 
the state and the federal government to aged 
persons in need. The old-age pension is a 



16 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



scheme by which wage earners may buy for 
themselves and their families by contribu- 
tions from wages an annuity payable when the 
wage earner reaches 65. 

"Under the old law the national govern- 
ment contributed up to $15 a month to old- 
age assistance ; under the new law this con- 
tribution is raised to $20, thereby bringing 
the top limit of this type of relief to $40 
monthly. Old-age pensions have been even 
more generously liberalized. Payments will 
begin next Jan. 1 to those who have made 
their contributions for three years and reach 
65, instead of on Jan. 1, 1942, as under the 
old law. On a graduated scale the pay- 
ments are substantially and progressively in- 
creased. 

"By advancing the date on which pen- 
sions will begin to be paid and by increasing 
the amounts of the monthly paylnents, Con- 
gress tried to head off 'wildcat' schemes." 
I don't know just what contact and expe- 
rience you have had with old age insurance 
to date. We know you have been making 
contributions for a year or two, but whether 
you are conscious of that which is going out 
on the paying end I am not so sure. One 
of the magazines described this act of Con- 
gress of the nation writing 35,000,000 life 
insurance policies. The changes made in the 
act deal directly with what is going to hap- 
pen to the family in old age and after one 
passes away. 

Congress amended the time of payment to 
1940. It set the time ahead. People who 
retire will receive these payments from the 
federal government every month. The prob- 
lem, however, of the wife and children who 
suffer when something has happened to the 
breadwinner of the family ; to illustrate the 
same, it is called the extension of old age 
insurance to survivors and widows. 

It seems to me we can discuss some of the 
technical conditions of old age insurance 
and you still will wonder what it is all about. 
Supposing you are 30 years of age, have a 
wife and three children. Beginning January 1, 
1940, if you suffer an untimely death, you 
can expect that your wife and children will 
receive regular monthly payments under this 
old age insurance arrangement as long as the 
children stay in school under 18. Something 
definite and reliable is available for these 
children. In case a person retires at 65 and 
dies a year or two later, under the old law 
payment ceased upon death, but under the 
new law the widow will continue to get 
retirement money as long as she lives. In 
supporting the old parents it seems compli- 
cated, but is not more so than a life insur- 
ance policy. I am trying to bring out that 
it is of great importance and will mean much 
in the lives of the workers of the State of 
Massachusetts in the next few years. 

The Social Security Board has established 
32 field offices, 12 of them in Massachusetts. 
It is a great pity that folks do not know 
their rights under the Act. These field officers 
see that the people get their payments 
promptly. Your State Federation and local 
union committees have been very coopera- 
tive with us on this matter and I want to 
express appreciation for that. 

Reference to account numbers. There are 
certain things we must do if we want these 
things to work. I hope you will feel free 
to call at our field offices of the Social Se- 
curity Board of Massachusetts and if you do 
not know where our offices are located, any 
postoffice can tell you where the nearest 
office is. I hope the conception of the Ameri- 
can people as to what is sound and wise to 
do in old age and retirement can really come 
to be what we all expect. We in the Social 
Security Board are anxious to help you to 
the end. I thank you. 



Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) asked 
Mr. Pearson, through the chair, whether 
on January 1, 1940 the contribution 
being made by employees would be one- 
half of one per cent, making the amount 
deducted from employees' pay envelopes 
one and one-half per cent instead of one 
per cent, or whether Congress had post- 
poned increasing the contribution for 
three years. 

Mr. Pearson responded, as follows: 

I am very grateful for that question. It is 
of utmost importance. Congress cancelled the 
contemplated increase from one to one and 
one-half per cent and left it at one per cent 
until 1943, so that old age insurance con- 
tributions stay at the same rate until 1943. 

Delegate Gethins, for the Committee 
on Rules, reported for the committee, 
as follows: 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RULES 

1. At the opening of the convention, the 
President shall take the chair, call the con- 
vention to order and the Secretary shall read 
the Call. 

2. A roll call shall be taken upon any 
question before the convention upon demand 
of 25 delegates. 

3. Seventy-five delegates shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. 

4. No resolutions or proposed amendments 
to the constitution shall be received after 
5 p. m. on the second day of the convention, 
except by majority vote. 

5. The sessions of the convention shall 
be held between the hours of 9 :30 a. m. 
and 12:30 p. m., and from 2 to 5 p. m., 
except that on the opening day the session 
shall convene at 10 a. m. 

6. Any member rising to speak shall, after 
being recognized by the Chair, give his name, 
the name and number of the local he repre- 
sents and the location of the same. 

7. The limitation of debate on all ques- 
tions shall be five minutes. No delegate shall 
be permitted to speak more than twice on any 
one question without two-thirds vote of the 
convention. 

8. After a motion is stated by the pre- 
siding officer, or read, it may be withdrawn 
by the mover, at any time previous to an 
amendment, or final decision, by consent 
of the convention. 

9. When a question is under debate, no 
motion shall be received but to adjourn ; to 
lay on the table ; for the previous question ; 
to postpone to a certain day ; to commit ; or 
to amend — which several motions shall have 
preced-ence in the order in which they stand 
arranged. The first three shall not be 
amended and shall be decided without debate ; 
a two-thirds vote being necessary to carry a 
motion for the previous question. 

10. Any amendment or resolution properly 
introduced cannot be laid on the table until 
the introducer of such amendment or reso- 
lution has had an opportunity to speak. 

11. The Secretary shall have printed all 
resolutions coming before the convention, 
and shall have copies distributed to the dele- 
gates before they are to be acted upon. 

12. When a motion or question has once 
been put and carried it shall be in order 
for any member who voted in the majority 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



17 



to move for a reconsideration tlicrcof ; Imt 
a inotion to reconsider, having been put and 
lost, shall not he renewed. 

13. A motion to suspend the rules must 
receive the concurrence of two-thirds of the 
members present, and shall be decided with- 
out debate. 

14. The rules of one convention shall 
remain in force until the Committee on Rules 
shall report at the next convention and the 
report be accepted. 

15. Roberts' Manual shall be the recog- 
nized authority on all questions not pro- 
vided in these laws. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

1. Roll call of Delegates. 

2. Reading of Minutes. 

3. Report of Special Committees. 

4. Report of Standing Committees. 

5. Unfinished Business. 

6. New Business. 

7. Good of the Federation. 

8. Adjournment. 

Delegate Gethins moved the report of 
the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 

President Morrissey then introduced 
Colonel John J. McDonough, New Eng- 
land Regional Director of the Works 
Progress Administration who addressed 
the delegates, as follows: 

Mr. President and members of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor — It is a personal 
pleasure to come before you on the occa- 
sion of your 54th annual convention. I can 
say, speaking in a personal vein, that I have 
known and followed the activities of your 
organization for many years, having been 
connected with the State Department of 
Labor since 1914. I became particularly in- 
terested and closer to the Labor Movement 
since 1934. On January 16, 1936, I was 
appointed administrator for the Works Prog- 
ress Administration of Massachusetts and I 
now have the distinction and pleasure of be- 
ing regional director for New England. 

During this period of time I have watched 
with great interest the efforts of all organiz- 
ers and business agents. As far as I can 
remember and as most of you here will recall, 
in the days gone by whenever the business 
agents (men or women) were looking for 
an increase in wages, shortening of hours 
or better working conditions, they were called 
Socialists. You had to pioneer the labor laws 
providing for minimum wages, etc. The laws 
of the nation which are of benefit to the 
workers were all sponsored by members of 
your group. You are responsible for in- 
creases in wages, shorter hours, minimum 
wage laws, wage and hour law, old age in- 
surance, etc. They are all traceable to your 
organization and were pioneered by them. 

If you would read the history of the Labor 
Movement, you will find that in 1350 no 
person (man or woman) could leave his or 
her job without being cast into jail ; if they 
asked for an increase in wages, they were 
put into jail, also, and if an increase was 
granted to them, the money was taken away 
from them. We have come a long way since 
that time. Our school system, which gives 
your children an opportunity to learn, has 
been established through your activities. 

You have all heard about the W.P.A. 
There have been many changes in the pro- 
gram and the Congressional Act passed dur- 
ing the last session of Congress will create 



mr.rc hardships to the workers than any 
other legislation we have ever had. Para- 
graph IJ of Section 1 i)rovidcs for 25 per 
cent sponsor's contribution. While this 
might seem a simple statement, there arc 
towns which cannot pay 25 per cent. If 
there arc no projects, it will mean no work. 

Section 15 (a) provided that in the North 
and West, tlie states will have a decrease in 
wages while the South may have an increase. 

Section 16 (b) provides for the 18-month 
rule. This is not a furlough as many people 
think. I think you will agree that there arc 
many young men who are 23, 24 and 25 who 
have been employed for some length of time 
and they should give another person a break. 
They should go out and secure other work if 
possible. My objection to this provision is 
that the men and women who are 60 and 65 
years of age, and over, are being dropped 
when their chances of securing employment 
in private industry is close to zero and this 
rule would be a terrible hardship to them. 
You are all familiar with the legislation 
against the older person but inasmuch as the 
18-month rule is law, we have no recourse 
but to carry out the law. 

May I say in conclusion that I have been 
fairly close to the Labor Movement for 
many, many years. I had the pleasure of 
establishing the prevailing rate of wage on 
the W.P.A. in Massachusetts six months be- 
fore it became a national law. Also, in the 
State Department of Labor and Industries, 
I established the first prevailing rate of wage 
machinery. 

I want to say to you, Mr. President, and 
to the members of your organization that I 
was delighted to come here today and you 
can always count on me personally and on 
my organization to help out the Labor Move- 
ment. Thank you. 

Delegate Bjork (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) asked Colonel McDonough, through 
the Chair, whether President Roosevelt 
had signed the so-called Hatch Bill. 

Colonel McDonough replied in the af- 
firmative. 

Secretary Taylor read the following 
telegram from President William Green 
of the American Federation of Labor: 

Washington, V>. C. 

August 7, 1939. 
Kenneth I. Taylor 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Hotel Bradford, Boston, Massachusetts 

I extend to the officers and delegates in 
attendance at the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor convention fraternal greetings 
and best wishes for a successful convention. 
The loyalty and devotion which your federa- 
tion has always shown to the principles, 
policies, and philosophy of the American 
Federation of Labor is deeply appreciated. 
You have ever stood, both in convention and 
otherwise, as defenders of the American 
Federation of Labor and the principles it 
has followed for more than 60 years. We 
count on your convention voicing its ap- 
proval and support of both the legislative 
and economic policies of the American 
Federation of Labor. I have assigned Direc- 
tor of Organization Fenton to attend and 
address your convention as the representative 
of the American Federation of Labor. 

WILLIAM GREEN. 



18 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Secretary Taylor then read a telegram 
from Organizer Anthony Valente, of the 
American Federation of Labor, and 
President Emidio Onoroto, Federal 
Labor Union No. 21928 of South Barre, 
Mass., as follows: 

South Barre, Massachusetts 
August 7, 1939 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Hotel Bradford 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Greetings. The workers of the Barre Wool 
Combing Company, members of Local 21928, 
American Federation of Labor, are on strike 
against deplorable working conditions which 
the company has tried to force upon the 
workers. Despite the fact that this company 
has not only defied but condemned national 
and state agencies who have tried to settle 
controversy, strikebreakers are going through 
our picket line under protection of the state 
police. We urge your convention to have 
committee wait on Governor Saltonsall with 
a demand that these state police be removed 
from South Barre. 

EMIDIO ONOROTO, President, 
Local 21928, A. F. of L. 

ANTHONY valente. Organizer, 
American Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Norwood (Laundry Workers 
No. 68, Boston) moved that the conven- 
tion comply with the request contained 
therein and that a committee be ap- 
pointed to wait on the Governor. 

Secretary Taylor offered the following 
amendment: "and further that the 
President of the State Federation of 
Labor be authorized to appoint the 
committee, to be comprised of five dele- 
gates." 

The amendment, with the approval of 
Delegate Norwood and the convention, 
was made part of the original motion. 

The motion, as amended, was then 
adopted. 

President Morrissey introduced the 
next speaker, Robert J. Watt, with the 
following remarks: 

It is now a genuine pleasure to present 
our former Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative 
Agent, who, since leaving us, has gone quite 
a distance. He now has the distinction of 
representing all American wage earners at 
the International Labor Office, and, if you 
recall, he is the same fellow who, when being 
presented to the King and Queen of Eng- 
land, had courage enough to keep his hands 
in his Dockets, wear a red necktie and a blue 
suit. I give you Bob Watt. 

Mr. Watt addressed the convention, 
as follows: 

Friend Nick and Ken, old friends and new 
friends and delegates to the 54th convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor — I better start by correcting my 



friend Nick. To be quite truthful and frank, 
I'll be darned if I know where my hands 
were. In view of the fact that many of them 
think most of us are hoodlums, they must 
have been surprised that I had my hands 
in my own pockets. 

It seems wonderful to be back here for 
this convention. Last year I was on a boat 
bound for home when the delegates met to- 
gether at Worcester, but it just didn't travel 
fast enough. 

The best part of my job of serving as the 
American workers' delegate on the Governing 
Body of the International Labor Organization 
is the joy of getting back home each time, 
and being back at a Massachusetts State 
Federation convention is really being all the 
way home. 

The longer I am in Washington or Geneva 
the more I realize the importance of our 
State Federation and its affiliated central 
labor unions and local unions. What we can 
do in Washington or Geneva depends 10 per 
cent on our efforts and 90 per cent on the 
Labor Movement back home. Unless local 
union officers and members are keeping their 
shoulders to the wheel, exerting every bit of 
strength and constantly enlisting more and 
more working men and women to join in and 
help, your representatives cannot accomplish 
the tasks which you expect and need them to. 
Today in the United States we need the 
Labor Movement as never before. I say 
that with deep conviction. I say it because 
I have seen the consequences of the failure 
of the people of other nations to solve the 
economic, social and political problems of 
modern civilization. 

We face real danger. Unless the processes 
of government and industry can be made to 
function well enough to master the machinery 
on which modern life so largely depends the 
people may listen to false prophets and be 
betrayed by them into bondage. 

When I recall the years I spent with you 
here I remember so well the many assorted 
names we were called each year. But I am 
surer today than I was then that the pro- 
gram of the Labor Movement could have 
reduced the inequalities and injustices which 
have thrown our economic machinery out of 
balance. I am confident that history will 
record the activities of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor as a constructive force which 
helped check the self-destruction of over- 
weening capitalism and restore vitality to our 
country. 

The American nation needs the loyalty and 
confidence of the masses of organized work- 
ers far more than it needs the little hand- 
ful who cry "wolf" every time their vested 
privileges and exploitation are disturbed by 
human needs. My long assignments in Eu- 
rope during the past few years make me 
realize more than ever before that humanity 
must have more intelligent guardians than 
the gentlemen diplomats, bungling financiers 
and greedy industrialists who in many in- 
stances have surrendered the birthrights of 
their people in their own short-sighted no- 
tions of self-interest. Any man or woman 
with a grain of common sense cannot see the 
peoples of Europe today without being glad 
to get back to America where we need not 
fear that each day may bring the sudden 
slash of savagery from the cowardly few 
who rule by force and fear and who dare 
not pause lest their sins find them out. 

Liberty, peace and freedom may indeed 
be priceless to all of us, but we cannot keep 
them forever unless we prove we are capable 
of keeping them. 

The ocean looks a lot smaller than it used 
to. It never was big enough any way to 
keep out dangerous bugs and beetles. But 
what I fear most is the effect of the poison 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



19 



which has been pumped into every free na- 
tion by the propaganda machinery and 
which is the first line of Fascist attack. Any 
American who uses the utterly vicious false- 
hoods of Goebbels or Gayda, whether to smear 
a race or a religion or a class or a nation 
or a nation's president, is blacker than the 
worst Benedict Arnold of our history. 

When I say this, I speak as one who is 
entirely opposed to Communisrn. Perhaps 
that is why I hate Fascism. It is the worst 
perversion of Communism that could be in- 
vented. Let's be realistic. The only diiTer- 
ence so far as the workers are concerned is 
that Russian Communism created a higher 
standard of living and liberty than had ever 
existed in the land of Czars and serfs. But 
it is not equal to our American standard of 
living or American sense of liberty. The 
Fascists on the other hand have destroyed 
the rights and privileges of free men and 
women and forced them to slave day and 
night for the pomp and glory of the totali- 
tarian state and the profit of the Fascist few. 

Fascism started in Italy as a labor-break- 
ing racket. In Germany the Nazis couldn't 
tackle the unions at first so instead they 
made speeches against the Jews, the Com- 
munists, and the international bankers and 
got their financing from the big industrialists. 
When a frustrated patriotism and pinching 
poverty deluded the German people into giv- 
ing the Nazis some leeway, they grabbed 
control illegally and at once destroyed labor 
unions. Strangely enough, while they were 
far more cruel to the Jews than to any 
other race or religion, they persecuted Catho- 
lics and Protestants who had money in their 
pocket and the courage of conscience. Yes, 
Fascism and Naziism started out as rackets, 
and like the Capones and Schultzes they 
muscled out their bosses as soon as they 
got big and tough enough. 

And they call this National Socialism ! In 
discussing this system with me at the Inter- 
national Labor Conference, one of the Irish 
representatives said he resented the misuse 
of the word "socialism." He said it was 
nothing but national racketeering. It was, 
he said, as if Al Capone had said to his 
friend Schultz, "Look here, this 'ere private 
ownership system is against my principles. 
So I'm a-going to bash your blooming head 
into your boots and collar the swag for 
myself !" 

But let's not forget that the Tories of 
England and some other European nations 
have lent their support to this brutal system ! 
It is sadly characteristic of the short-sighted 
privileged classes that they believe the 
Fascists and Nazis are defending order and 
culture against Bolshevism. One would think 
that the lessons of Ethiopia, Spain, Austria 
and Czechoslovakia would be plain to even 
the intelligence of Tory Colonels. But there 
is a power greater than stupidity — that is the 
"collective security" of vested interests who 
with their allies fight under any flag to resist 
the advance of democracy ! 

There is no danger of Fascism today in 
this country ! All the fakirs can do is to 
milk some suckers and stir up prejudices 
among simple-minded people. The danger 
of Fascism lies in whether our failures of 
today are ploughing the fields for the grapes 
of wrath of tomorrow. I am thinking par- 
ticularly of the question as to how far the 
people who are financing the domestic cam- 
paign of hates and prejudices are aware of 
the logical outcome of their efforts. There 
were a lot of people like them in Germany, 
Italy, Austria and even .<-,ome in Czecho- 
slovakia, but most of them were never able 
to cash their I.O.U.'s. 

There may be more than nine men in the 
Supreme Court of a Fascist country but 



under llic present system eight of them vote 
with bullets while the dictator ballots with 
his thumb. 

The danger to our institutions is not so 
much from their propaganda as it is from 
the failure of our representative democracy 
to serve the interests and needs of the people. 
I am thinking specially of the session of 
Congress just adjourned. Pique and preju- 
dice have too often dominated the decisions 
of the Congress rather than the needs of the 
people! Those who sabotaged the WPA by 
the destruction of the prevailing rate of 
wage, by the compulsory layoffs after 18 
months, by the inadequacy of the appro- 
priation, were not in most instances repre- 
senting their constituents when they voted. 

The defeat of the Housing Bill may have 
been a glorious spree for the self esteem 
of some gentlemen but it looks more like 
some boys thumbing their noses at teacher. 

It is a serious danger to a democracy if 
Senators and Representatives disregard the 
needs of the people they were elected to rep- 
resent. No one who has read the papers 
recently can doubt that a good many Sena- 
tors and Congressmen including some from 
Massachusetts have been voting as individu- 
als, not as representatives. 

It is time for us all to think carefully of 
what we need to do. Civilization is menaced 
by the brutality of power politics which was 
spawned in the stagnant waters of prejudice, 
selfishness and hatred. 

Remember Czechoslovakia ! It fell to 
brutal aggression from outside — but only after 
the sturdy strength of its magnificent de- 
mocracy had been destroyed by intrigue, 
propaganda and sabotage by those spies and 
stooges who were hired to create distrust and 
dissension. 

We in the American Federation of Labor 
have a duty to ourselves, our families, our 
fellow workers, and our nation. It is up to 
us to keep our nation going forward in 
decency, charity and courage. It is up to 
us to be the force which will prevent the 
Tories from betraying our birthright of rep- 
resentative democracy ! 

Delegate Menzie (Carpenters No. 1092, 
Lawrence) moved that Eobert J. Watt 
be given a rising vote of thanks for 
what he has done for the Labor Move- 
ment, not only in America, but through- 
out the world. 

Delegate Menzie then spoke on the 
motion, as follows: 

I want to say at this time that I am very 
much pleased with the address that Brother 
Watt has delivered here today. I want to 
say that I was somewhat personally re- 
sponsible for placing him in the Labor 
Movement some years ago. I feel very 
proud. I said at that time to the delegates 
in convention that I believed he was the 
logical man to elect. You elected him and 
he has made good. I will say again : He 
has made good in Massachusetts ; he has 
made good throughout the country, and he 
has made good throughout the world. The 
Labor Movement throughout the universe 
has recognized him. 

The motion was adopted by a rising 
vote. 

Delegate Reynolds (Teachers No. 431, 
Cambridge) moved that Mr. Watt's 



20 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



speech be printed and distributed to the 
delegates. 

The motion was adopted. 

President Morrissey then announced 
the appointment of the committee to 
wait on Governor Saltonstall for the 
purpose of requesting that he withdraw 
the state police from the strike at South 
Barre, in accordance with previous ac- 
tion of the convention, as follows: 

Chester G. Fitzpatrick, Teamsters No. 170, 
Worcester ; Charles E. Caffrey, Central Labor 
Union, Springfield; Max Hamlin, Meat Cut- 
ters No. 618, Boston; Franklin J. Murphy, 
Hotel and Restaurant Employees No. 319, 
Lawrence, and John M. Sullivan, Teamsters 
No. 35, Boston. 

President Morrissey introduced the 
new president of the United Textile 
Workers of America, C. M. Fox, who ad- 
dressed the delegates, in part, as fol- 
lows: 

Mr. Chairman and delegates to this con- 
vention — It is indeed a pleasure for me to 
come here and extend to you the greetings 
of our international union. 

As was stated by your chairman, this is a 
new international union, not a new interna- 
tional union exactly, but a restoration of the 
::harter rights granted by the American 
Federation of Labor recently at the Execu- 
tive Board meeting in Miami. At our con- 
vention in May your own Bobby Watt ad- 
dressed our delegates before he started for 
Europe. He, as well as most all of you, 
should be interested in textiles. He especially 
since he is so international in scope; you 
because your state stands second to all other 
states in this union as manufacturers of tex- 
tile goods. In 1911 your state was by far 
the outstanding manufacturing state, espe- 
cially for cotton and a large majority of the 
woolens, and since that time your state has 
been one of the leaders. 

There is another man who came from your 
district and whom you all know very well. I 
refer to Ed McGrady. I have listened to 
him at different places where he spoke, and 
he said the graves of the textile workers 
will dot the hillside before this organization 
is perfect. I know through the policies and 
ideas formulated by bodies such as yours, 
we have laws today so that those things need 
not happen. But even today they too can 
happen. We find that some people cannot 
see it in our light. That was the cause of 
the strike at South Barre ; the refusal of 
the management to go along with the laws 
of our country. We hope that will be 
remedied ; that the fight will soon be ended. 

We have started on an extensive policy 
of organizing the textile workers. There 
are those among you who have known tex- 
tile workers for many years. You have 
watched the progress that was made in the 
past. You wondered why we made as much 
progress as we did. Today we have our 
organization set up. In the past you have 
become accustomed to thinking of the tex- 
tile workers as coming before you requesting 
financial aid. That was because they were 
so low paid and always in fights. I want 
you to know we are endeavoring to use the 
instrumentality set up by the American 
Federation of Labor in our organization and 
that we are not asking any aid except through 



the American Federation of Labor. If you 
find groups of textile workers who desire 
organization and will get in touch with me 
or any of the A. F. of L. organizers, it will 
be a pleasure to come in and give these 
people what they want, organization. 

You have had a long history of textile in 
this state. In Connecticut, your neighboring 
state, the first textile mill was established. 
We have had fights immemorial and we will 
continue to have them until such time as 
those people are well organized so that they 
can have collective bargaining, and so that 
they can sit down and settle wages and 
hours and conditions with their employers 
without depending too much on legislation. 
We know that which can be legislated can 
be taken out through the same sources, so 
we are not depending too much on that. 

It has been a pleasure to come here and I 
want to wish you every success in your 
deliberations and hope that the dreams you 
have had in the past will be a reality to- 
morrow. I thank you. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) announced that House 
Bill No. 2234, about which he had 
spoken during the morning session, had 
been passed by the Senate, after three 
hostile amendments were defeated. He 
stated that the bill was important to the 
building trades. He expressed his 
thanks to Secretary Taylor and officers 
of the State Federation for the support 
rendered to the State Building Trades 
Council in connection with the passage 
of the bill. 

Secretary Taylor read a telegram from 
the Cigarmakers International Union, as 
follows: 

Washington, D. C. 

August 7, 1939. 
Ivenneth I. Taylor 
Secretary -Treasurer 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Boston, Massachusetts 

In the name of the Cigar Makers Inter- 
national Union of America I extend fraternal 
greetings and every good wish to all in 
attendance at the Massachusetts Federation 
convention. 

R. E. VAN HORN, 

President. 

Delegate McCall, for the Committee 
on Credentials, rendered a partial re- 
port. 

Delegate McCall moved that the re- 
port of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) offered 
an amendment to adopt the report of 
the committee, except the credential of 
Michael Flaherty (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) and that his credential be referred 
back to the Committee on Credentials. 

Delegate Kearney spoke on the mo- 
tion, as follows: 

I am asking that the credential of Michael 
Flaherty be returned to the Credential Com- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



21 



niittte. 1 l>rotest liis sitting in tliis conven- 
tion. I protest the seating of him or any 
delegate who is iniblicly declared as an or- 
ganizer of the C.I.O. I protest the seating 
here in our convention of a man vi'ho as a 
member of Painters Union No. 11 
(A. F. of L.) was assigned l)y the C.I.d. 
as the state organizer for the state of Rhode 
Island, and during his service created oppo- 
sition to the progress of our American 
Federation of Labor. I protest even though 
he may not now lie on the payroll of the 
C.I.O. I protest the audacity of a man who 
for several months has been preachmg a 
doctrine contrary to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor and then has the effrontery 
to come in and sit with us. You all know 
who I mean. 1 am not thinking of his radical 
ideas as a labor man. I say that we ought 
to have some right as to who is going to 
sit with us as a delegate to this convention. 
Brother Flaherty has been publicly adver- 
tised in the state of Rhode Island and in 
other parts of New England as an organizer 
for the C.I.O. I ask you, Mr. President, 
and I ask the other delegates, too, not to 
seat him in this convention. Mr. President, 
I tell you we are treading on dangerous 
grounds. Flaherty will become a martyr to 
the cause he represents; he will become a 
hero, and sometimes they do inject them- 
selves into the councils of the American 
Federation of Labor to become heroes in 
their own circle of labor. Well, I would 
rather let him be a hero in that regard than 
to let him pull the wool over our eyes. 

There is only one fealty we owe. There 
are not two masters in the Labor Movement. 
I ask that the matter be referred back to 
the Credentials Committee so that he can 
substantiate his right to sit with us. But 
those of us who understand, who know and 
who are aware of the activities of this rnan, 
know that he has no place in our convention. 
Let this not be an issue between the C.I.O. 
and the A. F. of L., for that issue has been 
settled plenty of times. The A. F. of L. is 
sound. We want loyal men in the A. F. of L. 
to sit with us and not men of the boring-in 
type of Brother Flaherty of the Painters 
Union. I do not want to deprive the painters 
of their right to representation but I ask, 
Mr. President, that his credential be returned 
to the Credential Committee and he not 
accepted at this time. 

Delegate Bjork (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) spoke on the motion as follows: 

I feel it would be an insult to Local 11 
not to seat Michael Flaherty at this con- 
vention. Primarily, because he received 
twice as many votes as any other Local 11 
delegate to this convention. The member- 
ship of the Painters Local 11 saw fit to send 
him here and I feel we should accept him as 
a delegate. I say it should not be the con- 
cern of the delegates here as to whether a 



111,111 is i|iiaiilicd to represent iiis organization 
as a dcligatc or not. I feel it is purely a 
local matter to send him here. He has been 
active in his own union for the past years 
and has taken an interest in the A. F. of L. 

Delegate Hamlin (Meat Cutters No. 
618, Boston), speaking on the matter, 
said: 

I liave known Michael Flaherty since I 
came to this country and I resent any remark 
aljout his loyalty to the Labor Movement. 
He is a fighter. He has beliefs and disbe- 
liefs. He has never deserted the Labor 
Movement. He made a mistake, and before 
he took the C.I.O. job I told him he was 
making a mistake. He recognized his mis* 
take and came back to us and Organized 
Labor has no right to turn him away. 

Mike Flaherty has been elected by his 
local union. Neither John Kearney or Max 
Hamlin, or anyone else, has a right to tell 
any local whom they shall elect as their 
representative to this convention. Each 
local has its autonomy, has its right to select 
whomever they choose and not those who are 
liked by Kearney or someone else. You 
liave no right to tell the membership of 
Local 11 whom they should elect. Since 
when has that policy been adopted? I think 
this would be the first time that a conven- 
tion ever interfered with the internal aft"airs 
of a union and I think the delegates will 
not tolerate such interference. I want to 
tell you I know Mike Flaherty better than 
any delegate here. Occasionally he is emo- 
tional, and emotions will carry far more than 
his lirains, but Mike Flaherty has a sound 
brain. He is loyal and I say it would be a 
shame if this convention did not admit him 
here as a delegate. He is one of us, has 
been with us and we the delegates will seat 
him here as a delegate. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) moved the previous ques- 
tion. 

After the vote was doubted the motion 
was adopted by a standing vote, 89 to 40. 

The previous question, having been 
ordered, and after the vote on the 
amendment offered by Delegate Kearney 
(Hotel and Restaurant Employees, No. 
34, Boston) was doubted the amendment 
was adopted by a standing vote, 90 to 
38. 

The report of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials, as amended, was then adopted. 

The convention then adjourned until 
Tuesday morning at 9:30. 



22 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1939 



MORNING SESSION 

The convention was called to order by 
President Morrissey at 9:30 a. m. 

President Morrissey introduced I. M. 
Ornburn, Secretary-Treasurer, Union 
Label Trades Department of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, who addressed 
the convention, in part, as follows: 

Mr. President, Secretary Taylor, officers 
and delegates to the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor convention — I could 
not forego this opportunity of coming all 
the way to Boston to express my apprecia- 
tion for the generous amount of cooperation 
accorded the Union Label Trades Depart- 
ment by the officers of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor and by the officers 
and members of the labor groups throughout 
this state of Massachusetts. I want to take 
this occasion also to express my appreciation 
to the representatives of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor in this territory. 

The union label, shop card and button 
today are more publicized than at any tirne 
since their inception back in the early 80 s. 
Everyone of you know why we need the 
union label, shop card or button. Everyone 
of you understand why there is a shop card. 
Everyone of you know why the union but- 
ton is used. We want to use these shop 
cards, union labels and buttons to advertise 
the products of employers so that we can 
get jobs for our members ; so that we can 
publicize those insignias ; so that we can 
get the consumer interested in these insignias 
when they are purchasing: merchandise and 
thus patronize union establishments. And be- 
cause of that, we have a great job yet to do. 
I think in the last 18 months the Union 
Label Trades Department has developed the 
most effective kind of publicity of union labels 
yet discovered by the department. 

For a great many years, in fact since the 
inception of the American Federation of 
Labor^ we have devoted the major part of 
our time and effort to perfecting our col- 
lective bargaining agreements. That, of 
course, is very essential. We must never 
lose sight of the collective bargaining agree- 
ments. But by being so wrapped up and 
active in doing this we have overlooked the 
fact that we have not gone to the consumer. 
The consumer, the one who purchases the 
merchandise, should ask for the service we 
render. 

However, to do this job, and to educate 
the actual consumer who is the housewife, 
we have decided to advocate the organization 
of women's auxiliaries. We are therefore 
urging all national and international unions 
to approve the formation of ladies' auxiliaries 
so that they might meet with the men's 
organizations and understand something 
about the problems of those of us who are 
charged with the responsibility of taking the 
pay envelope home. 

If the lady goes into a non-union beauty 
shop, it is our responsibility. If she goes 
into a hotel or a restaurant and doesn't see 
the waitress or waiter wearing a union but- 
ton, the responsibility is ours. And if they 
do not see the driver wearing a button, 
whether he is delivering milk, bread, coal or 
any other products, that responsibility rests 
with us. 



There are two things that I want to im- 
press upon you this morning. I want to 
tell you just how things are working with 
respect to our Trade Union Movement. 

First of all, I want to say this to you 
that today in the United States and in New 
England, the best in everything can be had 
with the union label. Within the last year 
the Paper Makers International Union has 
made it possible through their splendid 
progress for us to buy all grades of paper 
bearing the water mark of the Paper Makers 
International Union at the same figure and 
sometimes better than you can buy non-union 
paper. 

Here in Massachusetts you have two of 
the most outstanding men in the Congress 
of the United States, who, at the request 
of the American Federation of Labor, spon- 
. sored the most effective piece of legislation 
ever written upon the statute books of the 
federal government. I refer to Senator 
David I. Walsh and Congressman Arthur D. 
Healey. That law is now known as the 
"Public Contractors Act," but it is more 
cornmonly known as the Walsh-Healey Act. 
This bill provides that no employer can do 
business with the federal government in 
sums of $10,000 or more unless they meet 
the provisions of the Walsh-Healey Act 
which has set 40 hours as the maximum 
work week. The act says that no manu- 
facturer can do business with the federal 
government unless they meet the state fac- 
tory inspection laws with respect to sani- 
tation and labor, and the law provides that 
the Secretary of Labor shall set the mini- 
mum wage for a given industry doing busi- 
ness with the federal government under 
this act. 

As good as this law is, we would not need 
it if members of Organized Labor in Massa- 
chusetts and the other 47 states in the union 
would insist upon the union label. I am 
not going to quarrel with you because you 
don't insist on that. But I am going to say 
to the delegates to this convention that the 
thing for you men and women who have a 
union label, shop card, or button, is to take 
a leaf from the book of the building trades. 
Don't depend upon the other fellow doing the 
job for you. Go throughout this state and 
set up your union label cards. Don't wait 
for the cigarmaker or the textile worker or 
someone else to go out and do the job for 
you. 

You have a magnificent State Federation 
of Labor here. Your officers are working 
and cooperating in the formation of label 
leagues. When you go back home, those 
of you who have shop cards, labels or but- 
tons should get the ladies interested in or- 
ganizing auxiliaries and get your own wife 
or sister interested in a label league. 

We ran the greatest exhibition that the 
Union Label Department ever attempted in 
the city of Cincinnati last May. The distil- 
leries of this country banded together and 
refused to go into that exhibition because 
they said they didn't want to give Organized 
Labor any advantage. We felt that if we 
could find a distiller who was agreeable to 
organizing his plant and if we signed a union 
labor agreement with one firm, others would 
do likewise. We found that distiller — the 
Wilson Distillery. This firm has agreed to 
bargain with the American Federation of 
Labor and all its affiliated unions. Their 
brand is "Wilson" and they are now putting 
out a new brand known as the 'Union 



Massachusktts State Federation of Labor 



23 



Leader." Here is an oppoiUinily for us litre 
in Massachusetts to show a firm that by bar- 
gaining collectively with the A. F. of L., it 
means prosperity. 

Let us all resolve to adopt the policies of 
the pioneers of the American Federation of 
Labor. Let us go out and rally the unor- 
ganized into the ranks of the organized and 
teach them what it means to ask for 
the union label, shop card or button. 

In closing let me say that I know of no 
part of the country when they resolve to do 
a thing with more determination and suc- 
cess than here in New England. I am sure 
that if you adopt the policy of demanding the 
union label, shop card or button, it will 
save Organizer Murphy and his assistants a 
great deal of effort. 

I want to thank you for this opportunity 
and again express my appreciation for what 
you have already done and express the hope 
that you will continue to cooperate with the 
LInion Label Trades Department. Thank 
you. 

President Morrissey made the follow- 
ing announcement: 

At 11 :30 we are going to have as our 
guest the Governor of the Commonwealth. 
There are a great many delegates who dis- 
approve his actions, and although this or- 
ganization opposed him in the last election 
because of his labor record, we must remem- 
ber that today he comes here as ovir invited 
guest. It is my desire that every courtesy 
be extended to him when he comes here 
this morning as our guest. 

I am further going to ask that until he 
has had an ample opportunity to express him- 
self and has departed that no delegate ask the 
privilege of the floor. If the chair obtains 
that cooperation, I am sure we will have 
helped to dignify the office that he holds. 

Pi-esident Morrissey then introduced 
John J. Murphy, New England Repre- 
sentative of the American Federation 
of Labor, who addressed the delegates 
as follows: 

Mr. Chairman and delegates to this state 
convention — I am very happy to have the 
opportunity of extending my best wishes to 
the delegates at this convention, and to renew 
many old acquaintances. 

I want to thank President Morrissey, Sec- 
retary Taylor, members of the Executive 
Council of the State Federation of Labor, 
Miss Kane and Miss Cahill, our organizers, 
officers and members of central bodies and 
local unions and others who have so will- 
ingly cooperated with me in my job of or- 
ganizing the unorganized throughout Massa- 
chusetts. 

I know I have taken a job on my hands. 
I realize the responsibility that has been 
placed on my shoulders. I know and un- 
derstand that it is going to be some time 
before I can fill the shoes of Frank Fenton, 
a man who is second to none in this Labor 
Movement ! My friends, I know with your 
cooperation and assistance I will be able to 
do a fairly good job. 

As far as organizing activities here in the 
state are concerned, we have attempted to 
assist every international union that has 
requested assistance from us. We have 
turned over several new groups to them, and 
have brought new affiliations to the state 
branch. We have organized 14 or 15 new 
federal local unions since I have been on 
the job. But this was only possible through 



the continued efforts and support of not only 
our organizers but those helping to organize 
in communities in the various cities and 
towns of our state. I know I am going to 
continue with this progress if your coopera- 
tion is continued. 

We had the C.I.O. here but they are pretty 
well on the way out. A year ago Frank 
Fenton referred to them as the "snow men." 
They can't stand the heat that has been 
put on them. I can mention some of the big 
plants, such as Hood Rubber Company, one 
of the largest plants in the district, where 
we have organized workers into the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor. Thanks to Frank 
Fenton for his cooperation in Washington 
for getting us the action he did, wc will 
have an election there shortly. They employ 
4200 people. That is one of the new federal 
organizations. There are others, such as the 
Lever Brothers; the United States Rubber 
Company, where they have 1400 workers, as 
well as many smaller organizations. 

About my experience in Detroit. I know 
some of you may get a kick out of us 3.5 
organizers who have gone in there to upset 
and combat the organization of 65,000 mem- 
bers of the C.I.O. John L. Lewis issued a 
proclamation that he was going to take over 
the building trades. I want to tell you here 
and now that in so far as the city of Detroit 
is concerned and the surrounding cities, I 
visited every local and building trades coun- 
cil meeting and each and every one of them 
reaffirmed their allegiance to the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Things must be getting pretty tough for 
our "good friend John" when he could no 
longer support his brother and had to put 
hirn in as head of the building trades. This 
strike in Detroit was not a strike against 
the employer but was against the American 
Federation of Labor. You have no doubt 
read the newspapers. I saw some of those 
reports in the press, and where they got 
their stories God only knows. It is far 
from being the truth. In so far as the 
building trades men are concerned, they co- 
operated with us 100 per cent. Out of 
plants of 4000, 5000 or 6000 people who 
were on strike, the membership was made 
up of tool and die makers. If they were sin- 
cere, why did they let those men go on 
the picket line while their production workers 
stayed at work? Why did they go back 
to work as they did without a contract, as 
your local papers informed you? Oh, no, 
there is no such thing as a contract existing 
in the automobile field today with the C.I.O. 
There is a memorandum which may go into 
eiTect. Nothing that says it shall or will. 

This onslaught and this attack against the 
American Federation of Labor has been 
met. Not only has it been met, hut has 
served and acted as a comeback on our "good 
friend John Lewis." We have enough mem- 
bers there and we are going to question 
whether he has the membership. We believe 
we have the membership in that industry 
in Detroit and we are asking for certification 
in several of those plants. When they have 
already conceded the fact that 12 of the 42 
plants are ours, I wonder how many we 
actually have. 

They have their squads there and if they 
would go out and tackle our boys like men. 
I would say go to it. But no, they don't 
do that. Here are some of the tactics they 
use. A young fellow came to the hotel to 
see me and he said: "Murphy, I was with 
you but I am afraid I will have to be against 
you." I asked him why, and he said : "I 
iiad a visiting committee at my home last 
night. They came to me and told me that 
they wouldn't bother me but if I went to 
work tomorrow morning, it would be just 



24 



Proceedings of the 54'j'h Annual Convention 



too bad for my wife and kids tomorrow 
night." I can produce many men to whom 
the same has happened. You talk about your 
wild west stories or crazy yarns, you haven't 
seen anything yet. 

If Governor Saltonstall wants to go along 
as he has, he may be confronted with the 
same situation which we saw in Detroit last 
Tuesday morning, where the police were 
running down the street and the people were 
running after them. I say he can get that 
if he wants it. 

I could go on telling you of the different 
things that have happened and what has gone 
on in Detroit, but I know you have a lot 
of business to transact. Your Governor is 
expected any moment, but I again want to 
thank you all. There is one man whom I 
have not mentioned before but who has 
helped me considerably, and that is my good 
friend, James T. Moriarty. I want to take 
this opportunity to thank him for the advice 
he has given me since I took office and I 
want to thank each and every one of you 
again for your kind cooperation and con- 
sideration. Thank you. 

President Morrissey then presented 
His Excellency, Governor Leverett Sal- 
tonstall, with the following remarks: 

At this time we shall have the pleasure of 
hearing the Governor. I assure him the dele- 
gates have awaited with interest his appear- 
ance as our Chief Executive. Your Excellency, 
we cordially welcome you to our 54th annual 
convention. I am indeed privileged to present 
His Excellency the Governor, Leverett Salton- 
stall. 

Governor Saltonstall addressed the 
delegates, as follows: 

Mr. Morrissey, Mr. Taylor, Commissioner 
Moriarty and delegates to the 54th annual 
convention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor — It is a sincere pleasure for me 
to be invited to come and bring the greetings 
of this Commonwealth to this distinguished 
body. I say that deliberately because I think 
this body has more influence in the conduct 
of affairs of Massachusetts than any other one 
established group I know of. It is a sincere 
pleasure to come here to speak to you ladies 
and gentlemen as individual citizens of this 
Commonwealth, because I know that you have 
the welfare of the Commonwealth at heart. 
It is also a real pleasure to come and to see 
some of you ladies and gentlemen vvhom I 
class as personal friends and acquaintances 
over many years. I have in mind particularly 
a gentleman with whom I was just talking 
on the platform, "Bob" Watt, and I wanted 
to know what language I would have to use 
to speak to him as my French and German 
are limited to "how do you do," but that 1 
would be glad to have some one speak for me. 
I told him that recently we had a young 
actress from Rio de Janeiro who came to see 
me. She had to talk to me through a Portu- 
guese interpreter and if Bob can talk that 
language I will be glad to have this inter- 
preter speak for me, if necessary. 

I am also glad to find with me here the 
Commissioner of Labor, James T. Moriarty. 
I know he is closely associated in many ways 
with you ladies and gentlemen wdio are present. 
I also know that he has been very closely 
associated with me in the past seven months. 
I have taken his advice and I think up to 
date, although I don't want to pledge myself 
for the future as it would be dangerous, that 
T have followed his advice on all matters in 
his department up to the present time without 



equivocation. I took over the governorship of 
this state in January. I worked hard to get 
it. I campaigned for a period of about nine 
months and 1 think I told practically the same 
story about all the entire period of nine months. 
Anywhere from one to fourteen times a day 
1 talked and those speeches concerned this : 
that we wanted jobs for the people of our 
state, and what the government could do to, 
help bring jobs into this state. Now we who 
are present here today know that the government 
cannot secure jobs for all the people of this 
state or even a fraction of the people. Our 
job should be to create jobs for the people 
of this Commonv/ealth, jobs for younger peo- 
ple who are coming out of the schools, jobs 
for your sons and my sons ar.d for your 
daughters, to find some place for them to work 
in order to maintain our ideals of civilizations 
and our ideas of government in this country. 
That is a most important single problem and 
is one that overrides all other problems of state 
and national governments today. I found out 
it was not easy and when I lay in bed nights 
I often wonder what the government could 
do to help get jobs in this state, and I made 
up my mind that the first and most important 
thing was to establish the confidence of all the 
people in the state, that their Governor was rep- 
resenting them and not any special group or 
any special number of friends who happened 
to be in power in that place or in this place. 
I made up my mind that what the people of 
this state wanted, and it is so of many other 
states, was the feeling of integrity in the op- 
eration of the government. 

I have done my best in the seven months 
that I have been there and I am going to 
continue to do my best to live up to that idea, 
to that pledge if you will, and to that under- 
lying fact that is so necessary in government 
today. We have today facing us in this state 
and in many of the cities and towns through- 
out the nation, the difficult job of maintaining 
the services of government. We have under- 
taken the job for our people and are paying 
for those services without passing the burden 
on to our children and allowing them, when 
the time comes for them to come along and 
take over positions of responsibility, to pay for 
the services that they find necessary for gov- 
ernment development for them to carry on. 
It is a very practical problem. Obviously, 
efficiency of government services and the rim- 
n'ng of those services as economically as pos- 
sible, and the elimination of those services 
that may no longer be necessary, I have found 
to be a difficult problem. 

We have in this state more cities of 100,000 
in population than any other state in the union. 
I believe we can safely say that we have eight 
cities of over 100,000 in population, and when 
two of those cities today are in financial dif- 
ficulty then the government of the state must 
look into it. The state has been looking after 
one of those cities for a period of five_ or six 
years — Fall River. And now another city, the 
city of New Bedford, is in the same financial 
distress and it is up to the state_ government 
to say how and what that city is to do or 
not to do. 

We have other cities in difficult financial 
positions and we have the difficulty of solving 
that problem from time to time, and to reason 
out how much the state shall do in carrying out 
the services of those cities and towns. That 
problem involves revenue. 

This afternoon I have the burden of passing 
to the Legislature a problem of taxation which 
will involve the future of those services. I 
mention that because I know you are interested. 
You have studied it yourself and I hope, after 
the present Legislature prorogues, to have a 
group of citizens, including representatives _ of 
your own group, to study that whole situation 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



25 



with an idea of trying to make a better and 
more permanent tax program for our Common- 
wealth. We have had different ideas in the 
past but were unable to adopt any of these 
suggestions and 1 believe a group of citizens 
who have no axe to grind can be expected to 
improve the state and make some suggestions 
which would be of value in the future. 

You are here particularly to discuss prob- 
lems pertaining to the improvement of labor 
conditions and the improvement of your living 
conditions, perhaps apart from the other people 
of the Commonwealth. 

We have passed many bills this year. t 
want to say 1 have signed every bill concerning 
labor questions that has come before me. 1 
think most important is the bill designed to 
support craft unions in connection with the 
State f-abor Relations Hoard and I can truth- 
fully tell you it was James Moriarty who 
signed it. I said to him: "You are a member 
of the American Federation of Labor"; and 
he said, "I know, but I am acting as Com- 
missioner of Labor and not as a member of 
the American Fedration of Labor." And I 
stated I would sign it, and I did. 

Recently, Kenneth Taylor came to me with 
others relative to a bill to assist our youth, 
a bill to study trades that they might follow. 
As I said, I believe this to be the most im- 
portant single problem confronting government 
today. We also had bills covering such mat- 
ters as paying the cost of transportation for 
pupils of trade schools; laws affecting women 
and children in industry; the contribution by 
employees to the Unemployment Compensation 
Commission; the 48-hour law for women and 
children in industry; a bill improving the con- 
ditions for the boys and girls who are working 
in industry. Those are a few of the most 
important. I assume those bills have had the 
active support of your body as I have not 
heard anything to the contrary. You have 
another bill in which you are vitally interested, 
I know, the state wages and hours law which 
I recommended in my inaugural and still believe 
should eventually become law. That bill has 
been submitted by your body in many other 
states, and I am informed that it has been 
killed in most states where brought up this year. 
I signed this morning a resolve for further 
study of that matter over the next two years 
and I hope and trust that committee will be 
able to produce something so that whoever is 
Ciovernor in 1941 shall be able to sign a state 
hour and wage law in Massachusetts. The 
obiection to that bill has come not only from 
what you might call large employers in indus- 
trial establishments, but in a great part from 
the small tradespeople here in this state. We 
have approximately 64,000 separate trade es- 
tablishments, storekeepers, individual owners of 
small businesses of one kind or another and 
they have been opposed to it as the act would 
affect them. As I see it, the problem that 
has to be discussed with relation to that wage 
and hour bill, is how we can give confidence 
to the small employer in this state so he will 
not be put out of business or so he will not be 
hurt by such a law. It is the small business 
men. the small tradesmen if you will, who 
make up our communities and we have to see 
to it that he stays in existence and that he 
is not put out. He serves us in our every- 
day life: he helps make the sanctity of our 
community life, and while our chain stores 
may make a living at his expense, here and 
there, it is the small individual fellow who 
is the backbone of our community and we have 
to see to it that he has confidence in our laws 
and in our state. 

You are also very much interested in the 
so-called picketing law. T put it in mv mes- 
sage, and I believe T have told Mr. Tavlor 
and others that I believe that law should be 



cleared up so that the rights of the people 
wlio are picketing would be clear and un- 
clothed by doubt. I can tell you that 1 have 
spent more time on that bill than any other 
single bill presented before our Legislature this 
year. l>ut nothing has been able to be worked 
out that won't give tremendous jitters, if you 
will, to a large numljer of interests here in this 
state. Our job is to get jobs for our people 
and I want to make sure there is work for the 
peoijle in this state. 

James T. Moriarty and I are constantly 
working to get new business into this state. 
We are encouraging business to remain here 
and I have made it a point to go to new 
plants and congratulate them and give them 
encouragement in every way. I receive many 
presents which are sent to my office, but in 
one of the new jilants in Somerville, while 
there, one manager said to the other as I was 
leaving, "see that a carton of our best tissue 
paper is put in S-1 car before he leaves for 
the State House." And all I can say is that 
I took that home that night to Mrs. Salton- 
stall, a carton of better tissue paper than they 
had ever provided in my home before. 

That picketing law is a bill I am glad to 
work further on. We want to make sure, you 
and L and I say that deliberately of you and 
I and the other peoiile of this state, that in 
passing a law of that kind we make sure of 
your rights, responsibilities and duties and the 
rights and responsibilities and the duties of the 
employers here in this state — the big industrial 
plants — so that we can rightfully go forward 
to a better cooperative understanding of our 
mutual problems and not force through legis- 
lative influence the bills that might not be for 
the interest of all. 

You are also interested in the State Labor 
Relations Board. Before I jiut that into my 
message in any way, I consulted with Mr. 
Moriarty and I think he will back me up, 
although I do not ask him to do so, that he 
believed as I did, that the commission should 
be under the Commissioner of Labor and In- 
dustries. You have confidence in Mr. Mori- 
arty, and so have I, and I believe that law 
can be better and more effectively administered 
if it were put under his supervision than 
where it now is. And if I read your report 
correctly, you are very much disappointed with 
the results of the work of the commission as it 
is today. There has been no intention in my 
mind to emasculate the purpose of the State 
Labor Relations Board. But I want to get 
it more practically and efficiently run and 
under a man in whom you- and I in this state 
have confidence. 

I am also interested in the Unemployment 
Compensation Commission. I was told last 
week that SO per cent of the payments by 
that commission were being made on the nose 
today, and the remaining 20 per cent were 
being paid slowly because of difiiculties which 
have arisen, but that SO per cent were being 
met on the nose. If that is not so I want 
to know it. and I want to know why. But 
that is what the present head of the commis- 
sion tells nie and I have no reason to doubt 
that he is telling the truth. 

You are interested temporarily in the situa- 
tion that now exists at South Barre, Mass. 
Before I had any knowledge of that suhiect 
at all, the Board of Conciliation and .-\rbitra- 
tion had conferred and held meetings with that 
group and apparently they ended so unsatis- 
factorily that I received a two-page telegram 
wickedly condemning me and the Board and 
everyone else. I sent for the gentleman who 
signed the telegram and I said to him: "Y'ou 
and I can holler as much as we want, but we 
are not going to get anywhere." I found that 
he would not sit down with any of us and that 
he would, however, sit down with James T. 



26 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



Moriarty and he did, but as yet no conclusion 
has been reached. A week ago Monday night, 
yes, 1 guess it was Monday night, 1 was in 
Maine at my mother's house and was called 
on the 'phone late at night and was told that 
there would be bloodshed in South Barre unless 
the state police were sent in there. It is my 
duty to see that law and order be preserved. 
I asked Lieutenant-Governor Cahill to see that 
those officers were not used for anything but 
to maintain law and order. As I see it, every 
person individually in this Commonwealth is 
my responsibility and I am not going to have 
any person suffer physical violence or personal 
harm while 1 am in office if I can help it. 
in large cities where they have large police 
forces, they do not need the state police to 
assist them, but in small communities, as in 
the case of South Barre, where the police chief 
was working in the plant and is a member of 
one of the unions, the only way to maintain 
law and order was to ask the state police to 
see that nobody got hurt. That is what they 
have been doing. 

I told the owners I intended to withdraw 
the state police as soon as I was assured that 
law and order would be maintained and I asked 
Mr. Moriarty to get the people in question 
together this afternoon to see if we can get 
an understanding that whatever their differences 
have been that law and order may be main- 
tained. Then in 15 minutes we will withdraw 
what police officers there are in that neigh- 
borhood. But as I told Mr. Moriarty, I am 
not going to allow bloodshed in this Common- 
wealth if I can help it. That is the situation 
and I want to say that state police will not 
be used to promote or hurt any labor dispute 
that is maintained peacefully, but they will be 
used wherever there is evidence that law and 
order must be maintained. 

One more thing I want to say to you ladies 
and gentlemen is that I have been in our 
state government or interested in it for the past 
17 years. 1 served in the House of Repre- 
sentatives for 14 years, six years as a member 
and eight years as speaker. I was out for 
two years because of the ballot system, but 
now I am back. When I came to the Legisla- 
ture in 1923 I saw the House of Representa- 
tives kill at various times various bills that 
you were interested in. Gradually I saw the 
influence of your body grow so that things 
that you were interested in as a whole went 
through in that body with one or two possible 
major exceptions, such as the State Fund for 
Workmen's Compensation. I saw bills put in 
the State Senate that fell through, which were 



put in by your honorable body here, and others 
Uiat were passed. What does that mean? It 
means that you have a very much increased 
responsibility in the state and nation. I have 
been told in years past while a member of the 
House that the State Federation of Labor 
executive committee advocated legislation, we 
will call it "x," that the executive committee 
knew wasn't a good piece of legislation for 
Massachusetts, but the law of the Federation 
was that when an organization wanted some 
law passed that would help them they had to 
go through even if they didn't believe it was 
to the best interests to become law. I don't 
believe you can do it here now. Anything 
proper in my mind and for the best interests, 
that is advocated by your body you will get, 
but that puts the responsibility on you of 
making certain that it is not only for the best 
interests of your own group but for the best 
interests of all the people of this state. Other- 
wise it won't be for the best interests in the 
long run for your own group. I believe that 
puts a greater responsibility on you. I want 
to say that I desire to administer this state 
government for the very best interests _ of 
everybody in this state to tlae best of my ability. 
Nobody is right 100 per cent and if you are 
right 60 per cent you are doing well. 

I want to say that I want Labor to get a 
square deal and I want to say if any of you 
want to come to see me in my office, if you 
will gat in touch with Mr. Taylor he will 
get in. I will be glad to discuss matters with 
you and try to tell you where I stand, and also 
tell you the truth of the situation, as I know 
it. If I don't know it I will get in touch 
with James T. Moriarty and then give you that 
as my opinion when I see you again. I want 
to see you get a square deal, but I don't want 
to see you get anything more than any other 
group or at the expense of any other group 
that will hurt the best interests of the state. 
I want to see the employers, the greatest num- 
ber of people, or any other group get a square 
deal. We have a tremendous responsibility 
which has been given us over the past 150 
years. And as a father of five children, I 
am going to do my best to see that they are 
taken care of and the ideals given us are passed 
on to them. 

It is a sincere pleasure as Chief Executive 
to bring the greetings of the Commonwealth to 
this honorable body. 

The convention then adjourned until 
9:30 a. m. Wednesday. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



27 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9. 1939 



MORNING SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Wednesday morning at 9:30 by Presi- 
dent Nicholas P. Morrissey. 

Secretary Taylor announced that a 
representative of the Railroad Retire- 
ment Board had requested him to state 
that the Board's office was located at 
150 Causeway Street, Boston, where 
they have speakers available and neces- 
sary information for the railroad locals 
particularly; that because of the changes 
in the law they will be glad to explain 
the sections of the Railroad Retirement 
Act which went into effect July 1st, and 
that those who come under the Act are 
no longer subject to the Massachusetts 
Unemployment Compensation Act and 
that they should take advantage of the 
new agency. 

President Morrissey introduced James 
T. Moriarty, Commissioner of Labor and 
Industries, with the following remarks: 

Our next speaker is known to every trade 
unionist in this state. He has been privileged 
for the greater part of his life, and he is still 
a young man in his early 60's, to be a repre- 
sentative of the Sheet Metal Workers Union for 
a great many years. He still serves in an 
active capacity in his own local union. He has 
had the honor and privilege of being our 
President. He now serves the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts very ably as Commissioner of 
Labor and Industries. Any further remarks 
of mine would not bring Jim Moriarty any 
closer to you than he is at the present time. 
It gives me a great deal of pleasure to present 
to you Commissioner of Labor and Industries 
James T. Moriarty. 

Commissioner Moriarty addressed the 
convention, as follows: 

Mr. President and fellow delegates — I come 
here today as an accredited delegate represent- 
ing my own local organization. I also come 
here representing the Department of Labor 
and Industries of Massachusetts, and I bring 
you the felicitations of that department. 

After what I heard yesterday I come here 
this morning with some reservation. Many 
of the delegates know me as "Jim" Moriarty, 
one who was active as an officer and a delegate 
of your organization. Nothing pleases me 
more than to see the large delegation here rep- 
resenting hundreds of unions and thousands of 
workers of Massachusetts. I can remember 
when we didn't have such representation. I 
feel keenly my part in the progress of this 
wonderful organization, as I served four terms 
as your President. Everything I ever re- 
ceived politically or by appointment I owe to 
no political party, but to the Labor Movement. 
If my memory serves me right this is the 
fourth convention I have attended as Commis- 
sioner of Labor and Industries. I have heard 
three governors, two Democrats and one Re- 



publican, come to you and say that within 
your ranks you have men who arc capable of 
handling departments within the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. No better tribute could be 
given to you. 

1 like to get credit for things I do. I am 
not one of those who wants credit for things 
that I haven't done. I went to the State 
House as a Democrat and if anybody feels 
that I have changed my politics, I am still a 
Democrat. 

My job has not been a bed of roses. It 
seems that everything that had to happen 
waited until I became Commissioner of Labor. 
Anybody who can serve for three years and 
seven months during these times and receive 
the small amount of criticism that my depart- 
ment has is at least trying to do a good job. 

I wonder sometimes as we year after year 
advocate legislation how we expect it to be 
enforced. In four years my department has 
been given many new laws to administer and 
enforce, but we have increased our force by 
only six employees. I realize that we are 
living under trying times; I realize that money 
is scarce as far as government is concerned, 
but it seems that they can get money for 
everything else and every other department, 
except the Department of Labor. In 193.5 a 
bill was passed known as Chapter 461 and we 
have eight inspectors to enforce it throughout 
the entire state, along with their usual task 
of inspecting every construction job for the 
safety of employees. Under Chapter 461 I 
have approved and made wage scales involving 
more than $300,000,000 and have had only five 
protests, two from labor organizations, two 
from department heads, and one from ten citi- 
zens. This year you have placed in my de- 
partment an act of the Legislature, a further 
extension of the 48-hour law for women and 
children. My God, if I had the entire police 
force of Boston, let alone my force, I wouldn't 
be able to scratch the surface. 

Regarding the Labor Relations Commission 
that has been spoken of, I am probably just 
"nutty" for seeking jurisdiction over it. Two 
years ago I advocated that the commission be 
placed within the Department of Labor, and 
in my opinion if it were placed there two 
years ago there wouldn't have been much talk 
about it in the year 1939. If it does come 
to my department you will get the same service 
that I have tried to give in my three years 
and seven months. 

I want to make this promise to you. I am 
a trade unionist first and I am going to be 
with the State Federation of Labor no matter 
what happens. I have lived for 60 years 
without a state job and I know I have been 
here a great deal longer than I am going to 
stay, and for the remaining time allotted me 
I feel that I can go back and give further 
service to the Labor Movement. I still have 
the honor of being president of the Sheet Metal 
Workers Local No. 17 of Boston. I am chair- 
man of their executive board, not in name 
only. I attend their meetings. I served on 
the last waste scale committee which iust con- 
summated the best agreement that our organ- 
ization has ever had 

I have worked with the officers of this or- 
ganization and I think I'ou are very fortunate 
to have the type of officers you have repre- 
senting you. Your legislative Agent has done 
a good job. Maybe not _ always successful. 
Maybe he hasn't been entirely successful for 
the individual organization all the time, but I 



28 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



will assure you that he has put in just as 
much work on the small organizations' legisla- 
tion as he has on the large organizations' leg- 
islation, and he has been quite successful. 
Alter what we received in 1935, 193t) and 
1937, 1 suppose you feel we should have the 
same batting average on labor legislation as 
we did those years. But times change. Up 
to that time we had no such batting average. 
Batting averages are now being judged to 
some extent by the ability of an organization 
to prevent the enactment of pernicious legis- 
lation. In this respect you are leading the 
league. I suppose the most frank statement 
from a legislative point of view was made by 
the Governor yesterday when he said he watched 
this organization for 17 years as a member of 
the Legislature. He said that he remembered 
when you didn't have much strength within the 
Legislature. He said he watched this organiza- 
tion grow to a position "where you could get 
something." I am going to change it to "where 
you can now demand something." 

I want you to realize that the success of the 
. Department of Labor and Industries is not en- 
tirely because of me. I have three associates 
and an assistant commissioner and I have 169 
employees, and without their cooperation neither 
the department nor I could be successful. 

Of course I can't always be right, but at least 
I think most everyone gives me credit for being 
honest. After yesterday I will never be able to 
say "no" to any request of Labor, because if 
I understood the Governor correctly, he said all 
you had to do was get in touch with Ken 
Taylor or Jim Moriarty. But remember, if I 
say "yes" to you he may say "no"; and if I 
say "no" he may say "yes". 

I would like to briefly go into the Barre sit- 
uation. I want to say that in all my experi- 
ence, not only as Commissioner of Labor, but 
as a representative of Labor, this is the only 
strike I ever knew of that shouldn't have hap- 
pened. It involves the reinstatement of four 
girls. That would have avoided the strike, and 
by reinstating them now can end the strike. 1 
may come back before this convention is over 
and if time will be permitted may go into the 
Barre strike further. If I do I will expose 
things that you don't believe exist within 
Massachusetts. 

In my opinion we had a very dangerous bill 
before the Legislature this year concerning 
transportation employees. It provided that 
every transportation organization affiliated with 
ithis organization would have to go to a media- 
tion board and stay there for a certain length 
of time before they could strike, and if they 
did strike each individual would be fined $2.5 
for each day he was on strike. Your Legisla- 
tive Agent and other officers, as well as the offi- 
cers of involved unions, were very effective in 
killing the measure. I was criticized severely by 
the truck owners of Massachusetts for appear- 
ing before the committee in opposition to it. I 
want to say that with your officers we were 
able to get it out of committee with only one 
vote against us. If that piece of legislation 
were passed, God only knows what would have 
happened to your organizations. 

I would like to go into the reciprocal trade 
agreements. I went to Washington in 1936 
and 1937 representing the Governor of this 
Commonwealth in opposition to those agreements 
and I want to say that from my observation 
there is no part of this country that is going 
to be hit harder than New England, your own 
state, on reciprocal agreements. When you talk 
al)Out Gloucester, you talk fish. They will be 
alile to bring fish into the United States from 
Canada that will cause the wages of Gloucester 
employees to be reduced anywhere from 50 to 
75 per cent. 

I went to Washington about six weeks ago 



to attend the textile hearing for an equal wage 
in the textile industry. Just imagine fighting 
for an equal wage of a minimum of 32 1/^ cents 
an hour. And what did we see? We saw 
every southern representative opposed to having 
a minimum wage of 32^/4 cents an hour. Those 
who are against that minimum are of the same 
element that opposes every social measure intro- 
duced in Congress. 

I want to thank you for the opportunity of 
coming here and I want you to know that I 
am the same Jim Moriarty today that I was 
when I was President of the finest organization 
in the LTnited States — the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor. I thank you. 



President Morrissey then introduced 
David Clydesdale, representative of the 
International Association of Machinists, 
who briefly addressed the delegates, in 
part, as follows: 

Mr. President and ladies and gentlemen — I 
am not going to bother you much, but on be- 
half of the Grand Lodge of the International 
Association of Machinists, it is my privilege 
and pleasure to extend to you our felicitations 
and our pleasure at the growth of this organi- 
zation. I want to express our appreciation for 
the cooperation that has been given our or- 
ganization in Massachusetts, not only by_ the 
Federation of Labor, but also by other affiliated 
organizations, especially the Brotherhood of 
Teamsters and Chauffeurs who have cooperated 
with us 100 per cent. I want to say that our 
organization since February has been increas- 
ing at a rate of from 200 to 700 members per 
week. We have reduced the unemployment in 
our ranks from almost 40,000 members to ap- 
proximately 20,000. 

We find today a condition arising through- 
out the nation which demands courage in or- 
der to face the future. If the pendulum keeps 
swinging back and the forces of reaction get 
control of this nation again we are going to ge 
back to the good old days of the gentleman 
from Palo Alto. You know we have had a very 
economical Congress in session these last seven 
months. They were so economical that they 
chopped three-quarters of a million dollars off 
the necessary appropriation to enforce the 
Wages and Hours Law, and the same day ap- 
propriated $2500 to paint a picture of the gen- 
tleman from Palo Alto. If that is economy, 
then I am one of the seven dwarfs. 

You have no doubt heard the story of the 
two brothers who were raised together, side by 
side, and fought each other every day of their 
lives. Before the first one passed away he had 
inscribed on his tombstone an epitaph, "Here I 
lie as snug as a bug in a rug." And when the 
other brother saw that epitaph, he also had one 
made, and he said, "Here I lie snugger than 
the other bugger." 

Sometimes that has been the policy of some 
of our organizations of the American Federation 
of Labor. Today conditions demand that we 
have courage and realize the fact that we have 
only sixteen months in which we are sure 
that the National Labor Relations Act will re- 
main on the statute books. Don't forget that 
gentlemen ! You and I have no guarantee that 
the next Congress will be favorable to Labor 
and what has been written with the pen and ink 
can, by one sweep of the pen, be wiped out 
again. Then the employers will be in the sad- 
dle. In fact it looks to me that during these 
last seven months as if the leaders of Con- 
gress had become an auxiliary to the National 
Association of Manufacturers or the National 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



20 



When I came here 1 lold you I was goinpr 
tu l)C very l)ricf. J don't like to s|)eiHl, and 
being a Scotchman, not even time itself. And 
so I will say to you in closing, and bring your 
atlention to the immortal words of that great 
poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: 

"In the world's broad field of battle, 
In the bivouac of life; 
Be not like dumb, driven cattle. 
Be a hero in the strife. 

Lives of great men all remitid us, 
We can make our lives sublime; 
And departing, leave behind us, 
Footprints on the sands of time." 

Ladies and gentlemen, let us all go forward 
in this great movement determined that as long 
as life shall last we are willing to spend and 
work in order to make this world of ours a 
better place in which to live. 

President Morrissey introduced 

Thomas Eliot, New England Regional 
Director, Wage and Hours Division of 
the United States Department of Labor, 
who addressed the delegates with the 
following remarks: 

Mr. President and delegates — First of all I 
want to say how much I appreciate being asked 
to come here as I wanted to take part in your 
proceedings. I was here yesterday and heard 
the Governor address you. 

I want to make just two points of interest 
to you. In 1937, as you will remember, Roose- 
velt in his inaugural speech called for the en- 
actment of a wage and hour law. He was 
sincere, and that law, after a hard fight and 
with the backing of Organized Labor and pro- 
gressive men everywhere, became a law of the 
nation. It wasn't referred to a recess commis- 
sion for study for two or three or six or eight 
or 10 years. Now our job is to enforce the 
law. The last speaker mentioned how Con- 
gress cut the Wage and Hour appropriation. 
Nevertheless we will be able, in the coming 
months, to add considerably to our stafif of in- 
spectors. At the present time we have a few 
temporary inspectors who are being taken off 
and as I understand inspectors are to be selected 
from those with the highest experience ratings 
by the Civil Service Commission. Their ap- 
pointments will be brief, very brief, because 
of the permanent civil service register, which is 
likely to be established by October. And then, 
of course, we will have to take them from the 
top of the list. 

I hope and believe that in that permanent 
staff there will be a splendid representation of 
men who have come from the ranks of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Now we are working on enforcement of the 
law. You know we have convicted up until 
now 11 employers in New England of various 
industries under the Wage and Hour Law. 

We are anxious to enforce this law and to 
protect anywhere from a million to two million 
working men and women whom it was most 
particularly designed to help. In Congress 
they tried hard to hurt this law and the fight 
was led by such men as Cox of Georgia and 
other southerners. They were anxious to de- 
stroy the floor of wages that was set up. It 
will be a hard fight, one to save the whole 
principle and structure of this law for the 
working men and women in America and I am 
sure if it conies to such a fi.irht, the !Massachu- 
setts State Federation of Labor will be in the 
forefront of the battle defending that law. 
Thank you very much. 



Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
C'ommittec on Resolutions, made a par- 
tial report for the committee, as fol- 
lows: 

RESOLUTION NO. r,2 

CONDEMNATION OF GOVERNOR SAL- 
TONSTALL'S ADMINISTRATION 

Whereas, Governor Leverett Saltonstall in 
his campaign last fall, promised Organized 
Labor that his administration would pass an 
adequate State Wages and Hours Law, a 
State Fund for Workmen's Compensation and 
repeal the Teachers' Oath Law, and 

Whereas, He made in his campaign and 
in his inaugural address, many other pledges 
which, if carried out, would have been bene- 
ficial to Organized Labor, and 

WTiereas, Despite a Republican majority, 
he and his administration have killed in com- 
mittee or Legislature these bills and others 
proposed by the American Federation of 
Labor; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this 54th annual conven- 
tion of the Massachusetts Federation of Labor 
condemn Governor Saltonstall and his ad- 
ministration as anti-labor and pledge itself 
to secure the election in 1340 of an admin- 
istration which will be friendly to Organized 
Labor. 

JOHN H. REYNOLDS, Teachers No. 

431, Cambridge 
EDWARD J. MILLER, Electrical Work- 
ers No. 104, Boston 
T. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
CARL WALZ, Central Labor Union, 

Greenfield 
ADAM KURTZ, Carpenters No. 1372, 
Easthampton 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Secretary Taylor spoke on Resolution 
No. 52, as follows: 

Mr. President, all of us listened very atten- 
tively yesterday to the address of His Excel- 
lency, the Governor. You will recall that de- 
spite the fact that President Morrissey gave 
public assurance that he would be treated and 
accepted cordially, four plain clothes men es- 
corted him into the House of Labor. I may not 
have been in the trade union movement as long 
as some of the delegates sitting here but I 
should like to exchange notes with those who 
have been here a number of years to find out 
when a Governor of the Commonwealth ever 
had to have detectives come into the House of 
Labor with him. 

We heard his message — qualified as it was — 
relative to his position on labor legislation, on 
state police, and other matters in which each 
and every one of us are interested, and so 1 
think the best way to bring this matter before 
the convention is to do what Al Smith often- 
times said, "let's turn to the record." And 
here is the record. 

He said among other things yesterday that 
he had been in public life a number of years: 
had lieen a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and Speaker of that branch from 
1929 to 1936. but at that point because of the 
ballot system he was returned to private life for 



30 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



two years, and because of the same ballot sys- 
tem he was returned to the governorship last 
fall. 

You will recall that last year the officials of 
the State Federation of Labor compiled and 
distributed the labor record of Leverett Salton- 
stall which indicated that he had voted against 
us on 37 occasions and had voted with us on 
three. Never during the course of last fall's 
campaign did he ever challenge your spokesmen 
or ever attempt to dispute the record that we 
presented. He said yesterday, too, that he 
favors the things we favor if they are in the 
public interest. And so while he was a humble 
member of the House of Representatives from 
Newton, he voted against the regulation of 
private detectives, who go into picket lines for 
the purpose of inciting riots, who go into 
factories undercover for purposes of spying 
on Labor, and who do everything else to 
wreck unions, for a fee. He voted against a 
bill to provide for pensions for our aged citi- 
zens. I think old age pensions are in the public 
interest, but from 1923 until the time he 
stopped voting as a member of that House he 
was consistently against old age pensions. 
During that same year — ^1923 — he took another 
opposite viewpoint. Labor for years has op- 
posed any proposal to establish biennial sessions 
of the Legislature. He joined with those who 
voted favorably, although the bill was rejected 
by the Great and General Court. And also 
through those years he voted against bills to 
improve our Workmen's Compensation Act, in- 
cluding a bill to give benefits to maimed and 
permanently incapacitated victims of industry — 
a bill which I must say was in the public in- 
terest. It was enacted during 1935 and signed 
by his opponent of last fall. 

And so we come to last fall with a very, 
very poor batting average for Mr. Saltonstall' 
and what occurred? He went to the fish piers 
and shook hands and had lunch with some of 
the employees. He went to mill gates, shak- 
ing hands and speaking from his luxurious 
automobile, telling those good people that he 
was their friend. Their friend, if you please, 
with a record behind him of being against old 
age pensions, _ against workmen's compensation 
amendments, in favor of allowing private de- 
tectives to continue wrecking unions, and 
against all other laws of every type and descrip- 
tion that we needed, and which, incidentally, 
were in the public interest. During the course 
of that campaign he had printed over his signa- 
ture what we referred to as the scandal sheet — 
the Citizens Journal — in which he took credit 
for having passed, while Speaker of the House, 
every single bill that Labor either sponsored 
or supported and went to the trouble of saying 
that the Governor, James Michael Curley, in 
193.5 and 1936, simply signed the bills. In that 
same scandal sheet, he said that he wasn't sat- 
isfied with a two-bit wages and hours law for 
Massachusetts; that Massachusetts was too 
progressive and that Massachusetts citizens were 
entitled to something better than that, says 
Mr. Saltonstall. After the first of the year he 
joined with the sponsors of that legislation — 
the State Federation of Labor — and advocated 
the enactment of a state wages and hours law. 
Yesterday he seemed proud to discuss that 
legislation. He seemed proud to imply that he 
was representing the vested interests when he 
said that the Wage and Hour matter was going 
to a recess commission because it required 
study on account of the many small business 
men who would be affected. We know the 
small business men who will be affected. They 
are the same small business men who fought 
Labor when we tried to reduce the workweek 
from 70 hours to 65, and the same men who 
fought Labor when we tried to bring it down 



to 60 hours and to 55 hours and down to what- 
ever it is now. Again he succumbed to the 
pressure that was put on him by the captains 
of industry, the hotel and restaurant owners, 
the laundry operators and others with whom 
we have very little in common. 

He also said last fall, and in his message, 
and again yesterday, something about a peace- 
ful persuasion act — a peaceful persuasion act 
which is needed very much to preserve our 
Constitutional rights and to keep the heart of 
Labor beating. His language was strong last 
fall in favor of such an act. He continued 
with strong language until employers objected — 
then we couldn't find Mr. Saltonstall. I know 
that what I say is true because I have been in 
conferences — I have been in conferences trying 
to effect a compromise that would give you 
what you need with regard to picketing, to the 
carrying of placards and the distribution of 
literature. I was plainly told by some of his 
lieutenants that it looked bad because a com- 
promise bill could not be designed to which the 
Associated Industries would not object. Our 
reply to them must be: How can employers and 
employees agree on the question of a peaceful 
persuasion act? I feel that Governor Sal- 
tonstall, in that instance as well as all others, 
has preferred the vested interests — ^those with 
whom we have very little in common — and I 
think he should fly his true colors instead of 
deceiving you and me. 

Now we come to the Unemployment Compen- 
sation Act, an Act that is near and dear to all 
of you. A proposal was made during this ses- 
sion of the Legislature to reorganize that divi- 
sion, and during the course of reorganization 
Labor saw the possibility of two of its members 
and representatives on that commission being 
discharged without cause. I refer to Jim 
Meehan and Fred Graham of Lawrence. The 
Federation was not satisfied with the reorgani- 
zation bill, as drawn, and therefore proposed 
amendments, one of which would provide for a 
labor relations man in the setup so that people 
like yourselves could go to a representative who 
understood Labor and present your problems to 
him. The amendment was adopted, but Meehan 
was fired. Everybody in the State House un- 
derstood that the amendment was to provide a 
place for Jim Meehan as our representative 
within the new Division of Unemployment Com- 
pensation. 

The Executive Council then submitted 
names, as our procedure provides, to fill posi- 
tions required by law to be held by repre- 
sentatives of employees — names of men sitting 
in this hall who have the Federation's point 
of view and who would carry out the wishes 
of the State Federation of Labor. We proposed 
names for positions on the Advisory Council, 
which formulates and establishes the policies of 
the Unemployment Compensation Division. 
Those recommendations went into the guber- 
natorial waste basket. We also .suggested 
names of Labor men for a position on the Board 
nf Review — Labor men who would truly be 
representative of this organization, but those 
cTiceestions, too, were referred to the waste 
basket. 

We made a further recommendation to fill the 
nnsition of Director of the Division of Indus- 
trial Safety within the Deoartment of Labor 
nnd Industries, a nosition left vacant because of 
the untimely death of our late friend and a 
"rand trade unionist — John P. Meade. This 
suggestion was also assigned to the waste basket. 

You will, therefore, find that from the time 
^<^ went into nublic .service as a member of the 
House of Representatives until he became 
Governor, and from that time to the "resent, 
his batting average as far as the State Federa- 
tion of Labor is concerned is .000. So let's 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



31 



call a spade a spade. Yes, he [lut labor recom- 
mendations in his message, but that was all. 
Those of us who spend time on Beacon Hill 
have a good idea of whether he intended his 
legislative recommendations to be enacted into 
law. 

The American Federation of Labor, as you 
know, has opposed the so-called merit system in 
connection with our unemployment compensation 
system. The American Federation of Labor 
has constantly fought that vicious system sug- 
gested by employers — a system that will freeze 
employment and reduce the wages of those re- 
tained in employment. But to add insult to 
injury Governor Saltonstall, after consulting 
with Associated Industries, sent a special mes- 
sage to the Legislature recommending the merit 
system. 

Let's go further. We have a State Labor 
Relations Act. That act was designed, it was 
sponsored and it was enacted into law by the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor. No 
other group is responsible. No other organiza- 
tion is entitled to the credit. When the 
Massachusetts Federation of Taxpayers had 
one of its weekly meetings in the Governor's 
office they recommended that it be wrecked, 
and accordingly he recommended, contrary to 
what he said yesterday, that the commission be 
abolished, and that the Act be referred to the 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries, and the 
courts. Such a proposal would absolutely 
emasculate the Labor Relations Act. So much 
resentment was expressed by Labor that he has 
since dropped the words "and the courts." To- 
day there is in the House of Representatives 
his recommendation which, if enacted, will 
render the Labor Relations Act ineffective. His 
proposal is not to simply send it to the Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industries as he would lead 
you to believe, because we offered that as a 
compromise. His proposal is to set up a one- 
man director who would possibly be a bank 
clerk from Newton. 

Boiled down he proposes to change the Act 
and fire the three commissioners, for whom I 
have little sympathy by the way, and hire in 
their place a director to enforce the Labor Re- 
lations Act. The original proposal was in the 
name of economy, but nothing will be saved. 
Actually he would be able to give out about 18 
non-civil service jobs. The proposal is not to 
make the Labor Relations Act more effective, 
or efficient or more helpful to us. The pro- 
posal, as it stands now, is a job grab, if you 
know what I mean. 

I listened yesterday with great interest to the 
gentleman. I listened with great interest when 
he made reference to the use of the state 
■ police. He said he would withdraw the state 
police when he was assured there would be no 
trouble; that they were in there to keep law 
and order and to prevent bloodshed. I say to 
him that if he is a friend of Labor and if he is 
interested in preventing bloodshed and injury, 
he might well send the state police, not to 
protect or be nursemaids to strikebreakers, 
but to close the plant until the dispute is set- 
tled. 

I think, too, that the job of governor is too 
big for him. My definition of the gentleman 
is: He is wealthy, a very poor strategist, a 
very _ poor politician, a promise-maker and a 
promise-breaker. 

And so you have a resume of the Governor's 
activities up to now. If he has a good labor 
record, then I am a very much surprised and 
poorly informed Legislative Agent. I recall 
listenitig to my predecessor, Bob Watt, in 
1934, in this same hall when he outlined the 
labor record of Gaspar Griswold Bacon and I 
remember Bob saying that if the Lord Himself 
said that Bacon had a good labor record he 



would say, "Heavenly Father, I think you arc 
lying." That still goes! 

Delegate Reynolds (Teachers No. 441, 
Cambridge) spoke on the resolution, as 
follows: 

As Legislative Agent for the Teachers Unions 
of Massachusetts 1 also have been up on Beacon 
Hill this year and I want to add a few words 
to what Kenneth has said in his analysis of the 
Governor. As you know the teachers union 
has been interested in the repeal of the teachers' 
oath law. Mr. Saltonstall, when he was cam- 
paigning, said he was friendly to repeal, but 
when the measure came up in the House of 
Representatives, after being reported favorably 
by the Committee on Education, it was defeated 
despite a Republican majority. When reconsider- 
ation was sought members of the Teachers 
Union went to Mr. Saltonstall's office and tried 
to secure a word from the Governor. I spoke 
to Mr. Lynch, his secretary, not more than 
half an hour before the reconsideration came 
up in the House and he said the Governor 
would not say a word regarding the teachers' 
oath law repeal, and as a result the Republi- 
cans defeated it in the House. 

I want to speak about other phases of Mr. 
Saltonstall's administration. You remember he 
campaigned on the slogan, "Opportunity for the 
youth and security for the aged." Secretary 
Taylor told you he opposed old age pensions 
while a member of the House and I'll be dog- 
goned if he has done anything for the aged 
since he has become Governor. And as for the 
youth, where in Massachusetts can the children 
of trade unionists get an education unless they 
have money, or if they get a scholarship and 
can go to my alma mater. Harvard. The only 
place is one of the teachers colleges. Mr. 
Saltonstall was so solicitous for the youth of 
our state that he proposed the recommendation 
of the Taxpayers Association to shut four of the 
teachers colleges, a direct curtailment for the 
youth of this state. 

I want to mention another circumstance with 
regard to one of his promises. In his inaugural 
speech he said, "We are going to have adequate 
WPA in this state, we will get the federal gov- 
ernment to give us our share." We sent a 
committee in defense of the WPA to Mr. Sal- 
tonstall's office before the additional appropria- 
tion was acted upon in Congress, and asked him 
for a statement; and we were told, "Oh, no. 
he has nothing to do with it, it had to do with 
the federal government and not with the state." 
Another promise he didn't fulfill. He promised 
there wouldn't be any quibbling in regard to 
flood control, yet he ganged up with Aiken of 
Vermont and others, and opposed the federal 
flood control. That means that the trade 
unionists of western Massachusetts will again 
be in danger of having their homes flooded be- 
cause of the action of these reactionary gover- 
nors of the New England States. And not 
only that, but it means our pocketbooks will be 
milked every night because the Governor of 
this Commonwealth is opposed, as it would 
mean cheaper electric lights in Massachusetts. 
I introduced this resolution because of the stand 
Labor will have to take in the next election to 
see that a New Deal Democrat is elected in 
1940. We will have to unite with all other 
progressive forces in Massachusetts in selecting 
a candidate for Governor in 1940. 

Delegate Thornton (Holders No. 5, 
Worcester) spoke on the resolution, as 
follows: 

Mr. Chairman and delegates to the state 
branch convention of the American Federation 



32 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



of Labor — During the period of the campaign 
for the election of state officials last fall, we 
as trade unionists, we as people of Massachu- 
setts, witnessed one of the most vicious cam- 
paigns that was ever conducted by a man in the 
state of Massachusetts. I don't recall even 
when Caspar Griswold Bacon was seeking office 
that it was as bad as the one conducted against 
Leverett Salstonstall. And who was that cam- 
paign conducted against? It was conducted 
against a man of honesty, it was conducted 
-against a man of integrity, against a man who 
at all times would keep his word, and I believe 
in the seven months he has been in office he has 
kept his word. 

He told you in his address yesterday that 
he had taken up matters with reference to 
labor with a man who every delegate in this 
body loves. He had told you he took every 
problem to him and that as far as he knew 
he was going to take the problems of labor up 
with James Moriarty during the remainder of 
his term. 

Mr. Taylor, our Legislative Agent, spoke of 
positions. He mentioned the Board of Review 
of the Unemployment Comnensation Com- 
mission where they asked for a representative of 
Labor. I want to say right now that is a non- 
partisan board, absolutely non-partisan and so 
long as I am connected with that iDoard, it is 
going to remain non-partisan. I believe there 
are delegates representing organizations in this 
hall who will tell you that for the five months 
I have been working on that board that I have 
leaned over backwards to do anything I could 
for those representatives. 

I am a trade unionist and probably I have 
made more sacrifices, myself and my family, 
for the Trade Union Movement than probably 
any individual in this hall. I carried the ban- 
ner for the greatest organization that is or 
was in the United States, and that is the Iron 
Molders Union. I carried the brunt when there 
was the yellow dog contract and now the 
Wagner Act, and the anti-injunction act. 

Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) rose to a point of or- 
der, stating that the delegate was talk- 
ing about himself and not on the ques- 
tion before the convention. 

President Morrissey ruled that the 
point of order was well taken, and re- 
quested Delegate Thornton to confine 
himself to the question. 

Delegate Thornton continued: 

I want to ask the delegates to this convention 
not to be swayed by emotion. I ask the dele- 
gates to this convention to believe Leverett 
Saltonstall when he said yesterday that Labor 
was going to get a square deal. I again repeat 
that I am asking the delegates here not to be 
swayed by emotion; not to be swayed by vin- 
dictiveness, not to be swayed by this because 
of these things that are happening. I want to 
say this in conclusion, that if you carry on this 
line of attack on a man who I lielieve is trying 
to do a real job and you make several more 
attacks similar to the one made the day before 
yesterday and this morning, I prophecy that 
instead of Leverett Saltonstall getting 12.5.000 
or 1.30.000 niajority in 1940, he will go back 
into office with a half-million niajority. 

Yes, I did get a job. I am only asking, as 
a square deal, let's not throw ourselves open 
to the public with the thought that Labor's dele- 
gates are not going to give a man a fair chance. 
He promised you yesterday a square deal, now 
let's try it and see if he won't give it. 



Delegate Buckley (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) also spoke on the matter, as 
follows: 

Brother delegates, to me it sounds like there 
are a lot of reactionaries in this hall right here. 
When Mr. Saltonstall came here he mentioned 
the South Barre situation. He said that the 
chief of police of that town worked for the 
Barre Wool Combing Company and that is why 
he had to give protection to the town against 
bloodshed and there wasn't any up there. He 
is only going along with the owners of the mill, 
the same as the Republican Party has always 
done. 

There are a lot of labor men looking for jobs 
in the State House, forgetting their own or- 
ganizations but benefitting themselves. It is 
about time the delegates here realized that when 
a fight conies on a political situation that they 
should go out and fight for the men of Labor 
and not for themselves. How many delegates 
do you find fighting to put through labor bills 
and otherwise assisting our Legislative Agent? 
When the Governor came in here yesterday 
delegates swarmed around him like flies — men 
whom I heard knocking his head off. Why? 
The previous speaker, as I understand it, 
represents the molders union. Today he holds 
a state job. It is the same as some of the men 
who hold jobs on the Labor Relations Board. 
When Labor goes up there they give you the 
doublecross. I know the cases. It is a shame 
the way they handle them. So I say when 1940 
rolls around go out and support a man who 
will go out and support us. 

Secretary Taylor, again speaking on 
Resolution No. 52, said: 

You will recall that during the Governor's 
address yesterday he not only said that if you 
wanted to see him all that was necessary was 
to see me and I'd get you in, but he said that 
if you saw Jim Moriarty, he would "fix it." 
He further said he had been and would con- 
tinue taking Commissioner Moriarty's advice 
on labor matters. I hope some of the things 
he has done or will do in the future will not 
be charged to Commissioner Moriarty, because 
we know the statement the Governor made yes- 
terday IS an exaggeration. I know Jim Mori- 
arty has not given his advice and consent to 
such things as the attempted emasculation of 
the Baby Wagner Act and remember, when he 
said he would consult Commissioner Moriarty 
in the future, he said, "But I won't promise." 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) spoke as follows on the matter: 

I want to congratulate the men and women 
in this convention for the splendid manner in 
which they accepted the appearance of the 
Governor of this Commonwealth yesterday, 
whom everyone knows in their heart is not in 
sympathy with this movement. I believe it is 
a glorious thing for us to be able to go out 
to the country after the action of that gentle- 
man and remember that whatever legislation 
we stand for is for the people of Massachusetts 
and not alone for the men and women con- 
nected with the Trade Union Movement. Some 
of my friends told me they voted for Salton- 
stall for Governor based on the policies of the 
Republican Party, particularly in regard to the 
establishment of a state fund specifically for 
certain hazardous occupations, especially for 
those susceptible to that terrible disease — sili- 
cosis. That promise has not been kept and 1 
believe now we can see the real man and his 
sympathies and connections. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



33 



Delegate O'Donnell (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) spoke as follows on Resolution 
No. 52: 

The question is whether we are going to 
stand by the officials of our organization or 
take a message of a person who did not ful- 
fill his promises to the Labor Movement. I am 
not going to take up any time Mr. Chairman, 
but as a member of the Committee on Resolu- 
tions it gave me great pleasure to stand with 
President Morrissey and Secretary Taylor in 
support of their report of their stewardship and 
I hope the recommendation of the committee 
will prevail. 

The previous question having been 
ordered, the vote was on the Committee 
on Resolutions' recommendation to con- 
cur in Resolution No. 52, which was 
unanimously adopted. 

Secretary Taylor announced that 
nomination of officers would be the first 
order of business when the afternoon 
session convened, in accordance with the 
Constitution. 

Secretary Taylor also announced that 
the Cooperative Council of Boston was 
to have a moving picture display in the 
ladies' lounge in the rear of the hall, 
throughout the recess. He stated that 
the cooperative movement was sponsored 
by a group of volunteers and supported 
wholeheartedly by the American Federa- 
tion of Labor and that literature on the 
subject had been distributed among the 
delegates. He said that interested dele- 
gates could take advantage of the mov- 
ing pictures, which were being shown 
through the courtesy of James F. Burke 
(Moving Picture Operators No. 182, 
Boston). 

Secretary Taylor made the following 
announcement: 

I am in possession of a resolution which was 
filed after the deadline. The sponsors ask that 
it be admitted bv consent of the convention. 
Tt deals with the legislative proposal, now pend- 
ing in the House of Representatives, which af- 
fects the State Labor Relations _Act. about 
which you have heard so much in the last 
dav or two. 

In view of the fact that the matter is be- 
fore the House of Representatives it seems to 
me that it should be admitted. 

Secretary Taylor moved that the reso- 
lution be admitted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor read the resolution, 
as follows: 

RESOLUTION NO. 81 
EMASCULATION OF LABOR RELA- 
TIONS ACT 

Whereas, The address delivered by the 
Governor of this State to this convention 
would seem to imply that the organized 
labor movement of this State is agreeable to 
the attempt now being made to emasculate 



the Labor Relations ,'\ct, anrl 

Whereas, The Executive Council and of- 
ficers have been consistently and tirelessly 
fighting every attempt being made by the 
(iovernor and his advisers to emasculate the 
Act ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this, the 51th annual con- 
vention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor in convention assembled go on 
record as indorsing the action of the Execu- 
tive Council and officers oi the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor in their action in 
opposition to any emasculation of the present 
Labor Relations Act. 

URBAN FLEMING, Holyoke Central 

Labor Union 
JOSEPH L. MARION, Holyoke Central 

Labor Union 
LEONARD A. RYAN, Teamsters No. 

170, Worcester 
ALBERT FUCHS, Teamsters No. 646, 

Boston 
DAVID SANDLER, Teamsters No. 831, 

MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL, Teamsters 

No. 25, Boston 
JOHN J. DEL MONTE, Teamsters No. 

379, Boston 
JOHN F. DONOVAN, Teamsters No. 

68, Boston 
MATTHEW A. DUNN, Milk Wagon 

Drivers No. 380, Boston 
MATTHEW J. MALONEY, Milk 

Wagon Drivers No. 380, Boston 
NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Drivers 

No. 168, Boston 
P. HARRY JENNINGS, Laundry Driv- 
ers No. 168, Boston 
Secretary Taylor then moved that the 
resolution be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 
Secretary Taylor read the following 
telegram: 

Rumford, Maine. 
August 7, 1939 

Kenneth I. Taylor, Secretary 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Hotel Bradford 
Boston, Massachusetts 

May your efforts be rewarded by successes 
and may your successes never be satisfactory. 
Satisfaction does not energize the worker. Still 
hope that our organization will be represented at 
your assembly by President Dorsky, although 
he is very busy. Fraternally yours, 

CHARLES O. DUNTON, Secretary, 

Maine State Federation of Labor. 

The convention then adjourned until 
2:00 p. m. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 by Vice- 
President Doyle. 

Secretary Taylor read the provisions 
of the constitution pertaining to nomina- 
tion of officers. 

Vice-President Doyle then announced 
that nominations were in order for the 
office of President. 



34 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) nomi- 
nated Nicholas P. Morrissey (Teamsters 
No. 25, Boston) for President, with the 
followifig remarks: 

Mr. President, delegates to the 54th conven- 
tion — One year ago I had the privilege and 
pleasure and honor of placing in nomination 
for President of the State Federation of Labor, 
Delegate Nicholas P. Morrissey. If you re- 
member I spoke about the need and necessity 
of encouraging our young men to become vitally 
interested in our State Federation and in the 
problems of our Labor Movement, and you did 
elect Brother Morrissey as your President. The 
same philosophy was again described later in 
the nomination of your Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent. It wasn't because we were 
absolutely in dire need of young blood in our 
Labor Movement, but more to encourage these 
younger men to become actively interested be- 
cause these burdens must necessarily be trans- 
ferred to younger shoulders. The progress we 
have made during the year is indeed inspiring 
and gratifying. And I must comment here upon 
the improvement of President Morrissey. A 
young man, apparently, in our Labor Move- 
ment he rapidly advanced as a leader of our 
State Federation of Labor and he has been 
granted considerable assistance, too, by all of 
us. He has succeeded in office. His own inter- 
national union has made rapid progress through- 
out the Commonwealth and is today the largest 
unit in our Federation of Labor. I believe 
we can all say that we endorse the work he 
has accomplished through the year. And in 
order to give additional encouragement for him 
to continue his part as the leader of our move- 
ment in Massachusetts, I take pleasure and I 
trust you will join with me and acclaim Brother 
Nicholas P. Morrissey of Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston our President for another year. 

Delegate O'Donnell (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) seconded the nomination of 
Nicholas P. Morrissey, with the follow- 
ing remarks: 

Mr. Chairman and fellow delegates — I con- 
sider it a great privilege and an honor to second 
the nomination of a young man who I pre- 
sented to the last convention in the city of 
Worcester. There is quite a lot of water gone 
over the dam since the last convention of this 
organization. We have recognized the ability 
and the leadership of this young man, who 
went through a crisis in this city and survived, 
and in my opinion he has done more to 
strengthen the ranks of smaller organizations 
than any labor leader in our movement. I 
want to refer you back to the last strike in 
the truck industry. With his colleagues, John 
Sullivan, John Buckley. Frank Halloran and 
members of the executive board of Local 25, 
there wasn't a truck leaving a garage in the 
state of Massachusetts, serving notice on the 
employers; that when they started to do a job 
on the :;mall organizations, they would have 
to contend with Truck Drivers LTnion No. 25 
of Boston. I don't know if he knew whether 
he had a home or not for 11 days. I do know 
he got very little sleep. He was on the firing 
line and was in every nook and corner of the 
state. I am thinking not only of his own union, 
but of the success of the entire Trade LTnion 
Movement, in which he has been deeply inter- 
ested ever since he joined the organization. So 
is it any wonder that the loyal brothers in 
the Trade Union Movement rally to his sup- 
port when they find that he is a young pro- 



gressive fellow? Another thing 1 want to say 
is for the benefit of the new delegates to this 
convention. Perhaps they wouldn't be here 
today if it were not for the untiring efforts of 
your President. And as I said in Worcester, 
and I repeat now, the transportation organiza- 
tions of this state give you the "Little General," 
Nick Morrissey. 

Delegate Jennings (Laundry Drivers No. 186, 
Boston) seconded the nomination of Nicholas P. 
Morrissey, on behalf of the entire teamsters 
delegation. 

Delegate Allen (Steamfitters No. 537, Bos- 
ton) ; Delegate McLaughlin (Street Carmen 
No. 589, Boston) , and Delegate Stef ani (Cooks 
and Pastry Cooks No. 186, Boston) seconded 
the nomination of Nicholas P. Morrissey. 

Delegate DeAndrade (Plate Boys and 
Paper Handlers No. 21, Boston) moved 
that nominations for the office of Presi- 
dent be closed. 

The motion was adopted. 

President Morrissey resumed the 
chair and announced that nominations 
were in order for Vice-President for the 
First District, three to be elected. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers No. 6, 
Boston) nominated William J. Doyle (Electri- 
cal Workers No. 103, Boston). 

Delegate Stefani (Cooks and Pastry Cooks 
No. 186, Boston) seconded the nomination of 
William J. Doyle. 

Delegate Goggin (Boot and Shoe No. 138, 
Boston) nominated Harry P. Grages (Central 
Labor Union, Boston). 

Delegate McDonald (Iron Workers No. 7 
Boston) seconded the nomination of Harry P, 
Grages. 

Delegate Carey (Street Carmen No. 589_ 
Boston) nominated Michael J. O'Hare (Street 
Carmen No. 589, Boston). 

Delegate McLaughlin (Street Carmen No 
589, Boston) and Delegate Conroy (Central 
Labor Union, Worcester) seconded the nomi 
nation of Michael J. O'Hare. 

Delegate Lansing (Newspaper Pressmen No 
3, Boston) nominated Anthony J. DeAndrade 
(Plate Boys and Paper Handlers No. 21, Bos 
ton). 

Delegate Lynch (Paper Rulers No. 13, Bos 
ton) seconded the nomination of Anthony J 
DeAndrade. 

Delegate Higglns (Teamsters No. 25, Bos 
ton) nominated John Buckley (Teamsters No 
25, Boston). 

Delegate Tighe (Teamsters No. 25, Boston) 
seconded the nomination of John Buckley. 

Delegate Del Monte (Teamsters No. 379, 
Boston) nominated John F. Donovan (Coal and 
Fuel Drivers No. 68, Boston). 

Delegate Dunn (Milk Wagon Drivers No. 
380, Boston) ; Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry 
Drivers No. 168 Boston) and Delegate Moran 
(Coal and Fuel Drivers No. 68, Boston) sec- 
onded the nomination of John F. Donovan. 

There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the office of Vice-President for 
the First District closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for Vice- 
President for the Second District, two 
to be elected. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



35 



Delegate Dooley (Hatters No. 29, Fall Rivci) 
nominated Horace Caron (Carpenters No. K-iO.'j, 
Fall River). 

Delegate McCarthy (Plumbers No. tsr,, 
Fall River) seconded the nomination of Horace 
Caron. 

Delegate Pratt (Carpenters No. 624, Hrork- 
ton) nominated Herbert S. Ferris (Electrical 
Workers No. 223, Brockton). 

Delegate Dorgan (Hotel and Restaurant Em- 
ployees No. 161, Brockton) _ seconded the nomi- 
nation of Herbert S. Ferris. 



.Springfield) seconded the nomination of 
Charles E. C'affrey. 

Delegate Fleming (Central F.abor Union, 
Holyoke) nominated Benjamin (J. Hull 
(Central Eabor Union, Wcstfield). 

Delegate Tilley (Federal Labor Union No. 
18.5] 8, Chicopee) ; Delegate Payette (Mov- 
ing Picture (3i)erators No. 186, Springfield) 
and Delegate Naylor (Teamsters No. 404, 
Springfield) seconded the nomination of 
Benjamin G. Hull. 



There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared the nomi- 
nations for the office of Vice-President 
for the Second District closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for Vice- 
President for the Third District, two to 
be elected. 

Delegate Maney (Carpenters No. 111. Law- 
rence) nominated Timothy H. O'Neil, Central 
Labor Union, Lawrence). 

Delegate Nealey, Teamsters No. 42, Lynn) 
and Delegate Blaha (Machinists No. 319, 
Lynn) seconded the nomination of Timothy 
H. O'Neil. 

Delegate LeBow (Central Labor LJnion, 
Lowell) nominated Edward C. Eno (Elec- 
trical Workers No. B-101.5, Lowell). 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Workers 
No. 1572-1, Gloucester) and Delegate Wade 
(Central Labor Union, Lawrence) seconded 
the nomination of Edward C. Eno. 

There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the office of Vice-President for 
the Third District closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for Vice- 
President for the Fourth District, two 
to be elected. 

Delegate Shea (Street Carmen No. 22, 
Worcester) nominated Chester G. Fitzpatrick 
(Teamsters No. 170, Worcester). 

Delegate Begney (Painters No. 48, 
Worcester) and Delegate Conroy (Central 
Labor Union, Worcester) seconded the 
nomination of Chester G. Fitzpatrick. 

Delegate Chapman (Barbers No. 284, 
Fitchburg) nominated Charles F. Grififin 
(Paper Makers No. 12, Fitchburg). 

Delegate Condon (Paper Makers No. 32.'i. 
Leominster) seconded the nomination of 
Charles F. Grififin. 

There being no further nominations. 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the office of Vice-President for 
the Fourth District closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for Vice- 
President for the Fifth District, two to 
be elected. 

Delegate Kenefick (Electrical Workers No. 
7, Springfield) nominated Charles E. Caf- 
frey (Central Labor Union, Springfield). 

Delegate Hogan (Carpenters No. 771, 



There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the office of Vice-President 
for the Fifth District closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for the 
office of Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative 
Agent. 

Delegate Pearlstein (Newspaper Chauf- 
feurs No. 259, Boston) nominated Ken- 
neth I. Taylor (Typographical No. 216, 
Springiield) with the following remarks: 

My nomination, Mr. President, is in some- 
what of a reminiscent vein. A few short 
years ago when the then Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent, Bob Watt, was drafted 
for services in the international labor field, 
because of his proven ability, the question 
naturally arose as to who would succeed him 
in office. 

We all realized and appreciated the im- 
portance of filling this most responsible po- 
sition in the Federation of Labor. That the 
man who was to take up where Bob Watt 
left off had to fulfill a standard of excep- 
tional ability. That the man who was to fill 
the job was by the very nature of the work 
the spearhead of all activities of the organized 
workers in the field of legislation, and upon 
his shoulders rested the serious responsibility 
of translating into visible results the funded 
desires of the workers. _ And that courage, 
tact, personal honesty, initiative, abilit}', and 
executive capacity, together with unlimited 
endurance to assimilate the distortion and 
malicious misrepresentation of his every act 
and word, would have to be some of his 
qualifications. That the minions of special 
privilege and vested interests would do all in 
their power to discredit him in the eyes of 
his fellow workers and the general public. 

This job demands unswerving loyalty to the 
workers and that no consideration, mone- 
tary or otherwise, would or could influence 
liis word or act. In short, that the man 
for the job must be of unimpeachable char- 
acter. There was a polite lifting of eyebrows 
when the man I am about to nominate was 
placed in nomination for the job. Where 
did he come from? What does he know 
about the job? What does he know about 
Labor, its mechanics or philosophy? These 
and many other thoughts ran through our 
minds. He was elected to the job. And 
was again elected the following year. Not 
alone did he emulate the work of Iiis prede- 
cessor in office, but will, in a very short 
time, in my humble opinion, run him a close 
second in achievements for the workers for 
our state. L^nquestionably he has made good, 
and it is with sincere pleasure I place in 
nomination for the job of Secretary-Treas- 
urer-Legislative Agent, the delegate from the 
Springfield Typographical Union, the present 
incumbent, Kenneth I. Taylor. 



36 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) seconded the nomination of 
Kenneth I. Taylor, with the following 
remarks: 

Mr. President, members of the Executive 
Council, fellow delegates, ladies and gentle- 
men — What I am about to express I be- 
lieve is in the hearts and minds of every 
member of this convention. After that 
demonstration just given it doesn't seem 
necessary to say anything further. But I 
feel proud of this opportunity at this 54th 
convention ; I feel proud of this opportunity 
— not alone because he is a fellow member 
of the Typographical Union — but because of 
his personality, his ability to fill the shoes 
of that splendid type, a product of Organized 
Labor, Robert J. Watt ; and I feel particu- 
larly so because of his background and his 
surroundings. 

Four years ago in the city of Springfield, 
a young man was selected by Local 216, 
Typographical Union, as president of that 
body. He was doing splendid service and 
his employer thought, or heard probably, 
about the splendid service he was doing and 
offered him the foremanship of the composing 
room. Mr. Taylor's answer was: "My first 
duty is to the Typographical Union, and 
while I appreciate the honor you have given 
me, I must respectfully decline." Mr. Tay- 
lor was fired. The union, in its loyalty, stood 
by him. They took action on the matter 
and left the office in a way that makes us 
proud — a local union expressing sympathy 
by giving up their situations for a brother 
because of action taken against him. 

Mr. Taylor came to Boston and here in 
Boston he filled the shoes of that splendid 
intellectual type I have just mentioned. 

As Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent 
he has helped to build this organization to 
its splendid proportions which caused the 
Governor of this Commonwealth to state from 
this platform yesterday that we were the 
most important group in the Commonwealth. 
I could go on all afternoon talking about my 
young friend. It is a particular pleasure, 
however, as perhaps many of you know, for 
the oldest delegate in attendance at this con- 
vention — but I am not the oldest in years, 
as I have discovered Jim Menzie is two years 
older than I am and I have to give credit 
to him for being dean of the convention and 
I will be assistant dean — I would like to 
make a motion, though it is not permissible 
under parliamentary law after a speech, and 
I am going to suggest, therefore, that some 
delegate follow me, with the understanding 
there is no other candidate, and make a mo- 
tion that Mr. Taylor be nominated by 
acclamation. I want to extend to my good 
friend, as the oldest man to the youngest 
man in the movement, my best wishes. Good 
luck to you, Ken, and God bless you. 

Delegate Nealey (Teamsters No. 42, 
Lynn) also seconded the nomination of 
Kenneth I. Taylor, with the following 
remarks: 

I listened very attentively to Brother 
Nolan's remarks. He told us how many 
years my good friend Jom Menzie has been 
coming to our conventions. I want to say 
that he told me that I was an old man 
when he started coming here. So to add 
to the confusion I am beginning to wonder 
what my age really is. I refuse to say how 
old I am, however, but I am still going 
strong in the Labor Movement just the same. 

Mr- Chairman, I presume that we might 



stand here all afternoon and talk of the 
qualifications and the great work that Ken- 
neth Taylor has done. Any of us that has 
been in the Labor Movement for any length 
of time knows the great work he has done. 
I knew the Secretary-Treasurer of the State 
Federation of Labor when Denny Driscoll 
held that office and Martin Joyce and then 
Bob Watt. Now we have Ken Taylor, and 
I say that in my opinion he is one of the 
best we ever had. I am not going to stand 
here and eulogize the man, because his 
record speaks for itself, nor do we have to 
enumerate all the wonderful things he has 
done. They, too, speak for themselves. It 
is sufficient to say, in my opinion, that he 
has done a wonderful job and we all know 
he is going to continue, and so, personally 
and on behalf of the entire teamsters dele- 
gation, I desire to second the nomination of 
Kenneth I. Taylor for the office of Secretary- 
Treasurer-Legislative Agent. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) moved that 
nominations be closed by acclamation. 

Delegate Gethins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) rose to a point of order, 
stating that he desired to offer the name 
of a delegate in nomination for the of- 
fice of Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative 
Agent. 

President Morissey ruled that the 
point of order was well taken, stating 
that accredited delegates were entitled 
to seek or nominate another for any 
office within the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Gethins then nominated Charles 
E. Caffrey (Central Labor Union, Spring- 
field). 

Delegate Conroy (Central Labor _ Union, 
Worcester") seconded the nomination of 
Charles E. Cafifrey. 

Delegate Caffrey declined the nomina- 
tion, with the following remarks: 

Mr. Chairman, having been out of the con- 
vention hall as a member of the committee 
to meet with the Governor regarding the 
South Barre situation, I have just returned. 
I understand that I have been nominated as 
Secretary-Treasurer of this organization. Is 
that so Mr. President? 

President Morrissey answered in the 
affirmative. 

Delegate Caffrey continued: 

Then I respectfully decline. I am sorry 
this unfortunate incident occurred in my 

absence. 

There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the office of Secretary-Treas- 
urer-Legislative Agent closed. 

Vice-President Doyle was called to the 
chair and announced that nominations 
were in order for delegate to the con- 
vention of the American Federation of 
Labor, 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



37 



Delegate Morrissey (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) nominated Kenneth I. Taylor 
(Typographical No. 216, Springfield), 
with the following remarks: 

It was the opinion of my predecessor that 
tlie fellow who carries the ball 365 days of 
the year for the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor be the selection of the dele- 
gates to represent us at the American Federa- 
tion of Labor convention. I agree with that 
policy and therefore place in nomination the 
name of Kenneth I. Taylor to be the dele- 
gate of the State Federation of Labor at 
the forthcoming convention of the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Conroy (Central Labor Union, 
Worcester) seconded the nomination of Ken- 
neth I. Taylor. 

Delegate Meehan (Painters No. 44, 
Lawrence) also seconded the nomination 
of Kenneth L Taylor, with the following 
remarks: 

Along with every other delegate to this 
convention, I have had an opportunity to 
observe our Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative 
Agent during the performance of his duties. 
When he first assumed the position, he had 
an occasion to come to me and I assured 
him at that time, as a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Senate, that I would do everything 
possible to be of assistance, the same as I 
was to his predecessor when he went on the 
job. In the short time that Kenneth Taylor 
has been Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative 

Agent of this State Federation of Labor, a 
position of great responsibility, he has 
demonstrated to the trade unions of this 
Commonwealth and this country that our 
Federation of Labor selected a man of ability, 
a man of sincerity and purpose, who is will- 
ing to work unstintingly for the interests of 
the wage earners of this Commonwealth. 
Perhaps I do not habitate the office as much 
as some delegates, but I remember a visit 
I made last week to the office of the State 
Federation of Labor, and in a conversation 
with his secretary, Miss Kane, she told me 
she came to work at 9 o'clock and Ken 
Taylor was sleeping at his desk — he had 
been working all night. He hadn't left the 
office. Mr. President, I consider it a priv- 
ilege and a pleasure to second the nomina- 
tion of our Secretary-Treasurer, Kenneth Tay- 
lor, to have him represent this State Federa- 
tion as we desire to be represented at the 
convention of the American Federation of 
Labor in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

There being no further nominations, 
Vice-President Doyle declared nomina- 
tions for delegate to the convention of 
the American Federation of Labor 
closed. 

President Morrissey resumed the chair 
and announced that nominations were in 
order for alternate to the convention 
of the American Federation of Labor. 

Delegate O'Donnell (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) nominated John M. Sullivan 
(Teamsters No. 25, Boston). 

Delegate Jenkins (Teamsters No. 25, Bos- 
ton) seconded the nomination of John M. 
Sullivan. 

Delegate Hull (Central Labor Union, West- 
field) nominated Nicholas P. Morrissey 
(Teamsters No. 25, Boston). 

Delegate Morrissey declined the nomination. 



There being no further nominations. 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for alternate to the convention of 
the American Federation of Labor 
closed. 

President Morrissey announced that 
nominations were in order for the con- 
vention city for 1940. 

Delegate Caffrey (Central Labor 
Union, Springfield) stated that the 
Springfield Central Labor Union had 
voted to invite the State Federation of 
Labor to hold its 55th annual convention 
in Springfield in 1940, and therefore 
nominated the city of Springfield. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) seconded the nomination of the 
city of Springfield. 

There being no further nominations, 
President Morrissey declared nomina- 
tions for the convention city for 1940 
closed. 

President Morrissey then declared all 
nominations closed. 

President Morrissey presented Warren 
Jay Vinton, Chief Economist and Plan- 
ning Officer of the United States Hous- 
ing Authority, who addressed the dele- 
gates as follows: 

In the development of public housing in 
America, Labor has played a significant role. 
Without the vision and the realistic approach, 
which characterized Labor's participation in 
the early stages of the public housing pro- 
gram, we would today still be talking and 
writing about housing instead of building 
homes for workers' families. This I say as 
one who has closely observed the growth of 
the public housing movement, as one who 
has had a hand in both the formulation and 
administration of the present program. 

It therefore gives me great pleasure to 
address this meeting of the Federation of 
Labor in the great Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts — one of the leading states taking 
part in the public housing program. And I 
am doubly pleased to speak before this par- 
ticular Labor body because it has given to 
the housing movement so able a leader as 
John Carroll and as valiant a fighter as 
Kenneth Taylor. I have had many occasions 
to work closely with John Carroll and have 
the highest regard for his ability and effec- 
tiveness in your Commonwealth. As Chair- 
man of the State Board of Housing_ and as 
an active member of the Boston Housing 
Authority, he is an outstanding example of 
the ability of Labor to provide leadership in 
community affairs. In Kenneth Taylor, 
Massachusetts has furnished the public hous- 
ing movement one of the leaders in the recent 
fight for an extension of the program. His 
tireless aid will not be forgotten by those 
who have been privileged to work with him. 

When I said that Labor played a signifi- 
cant role in the development of public hous- 
ing in America, I meant that Labor not only 
contributed to the housing movement, but 
was a decisive factor. Let us go back a few 
years and trace the development of a na- 
tional movement which onlv six or seven 



38 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



short years ago was no more than a discus- 
sion topic for a handful of housing "experts." 

Among the various efforts during the early 
days of the New Deal, we find several at- 
tempts at developing a public housing pro- 
gram. There was the Housing Division of 
the PWA, and the rural and suburban divi- 
sions of the Resettlement Administration. The 
Housing Division built 51 low-rent projects 
for some 20,000 families in 37 cities through- 
out the country. Suburban Resettlement 
built the three well-known Greenbelt towns, 
and Rural Resettlement provided homes for 
farmers and stranded workers. 

But these early public housing activities 
were conducted as emergency measures. They 
were only the beginning of a comprehensive 
program to meet America's housing needs, 
to establish public responsibility for housing. 

It was Labor's proposals for a public 
housing program that helped crystallize the 
experiences of those early efforts. In the 
resolution passed at the annual convention of 
the American Federation of Labor, held at 
Atlantic City in October, 1935, we saw the 
first outlines of the present program. It 
was my privilege to work in close collabora- 
tion with your national committee at that 
time and also to help further at the Tampa 
convention the following year. 

Here, for the first time, we had general 
acceptance of public responsibility for the 
housing of families for whom private enter- 
prise cannot provide decent homes. The 1935 
resolution served to formulate a program 
out of the confusion which was natural in 
early thinking on so complex a social, eco- 
nomic and technical problem as housing. Al- 
though the public housing program in 
America was 20 years behind that of Euro- 
pean countries, once we discovered the basis 
for common agreement, it was possible to 
make real headway. And the present pro- 
gram of the United States Housing Au- 
thority, a program which is completely de- 
centralized, which places the initiative and 
responsibility directly in the hands of local 
communities, is the program which grew out 
of this early formulation by j'our conven- 
tion, representing organized labor in 
America. 

What are Labor's main concerns? If we 
state the main objectives of Organized Labor, 
we will immediately have a gauge against 
which to measure the value and importance 
jf the public housing program to Labor. 

Labor's first concern is employment at 
wages and working conditions that will pro- 
tect and extend the gains made through years 
of struggle and sacrifice. In the public 
housing program, you have written the pro- 
visions which are today protecting those 
standards. 

Under the LTSHA program payment of pre- 
vailing wage rates is mandatory. In deter- 
mining prevailing wage rates, the USHA and 
the local housing authorities are giving every 
consideration to the wage rates your building 
trades unions have won through collective 
bargaining. We have made it a condition 
of every loan contract with a local authority 
that all employees of a contractor shall have 
the rights of organization and collective bar- 
gaining: that standards of safety shall be 
observed on all work; that hours of work 
shall not be lengthened ; that overtime pay- 
merit shall be made; that complaints shall 
be investigated and handled promptly, so that 
in every way possible Labor may be pro- 
tected. 

In Massachusetts, under the loan contracts 
now in effect with local housing authorities, 
more than 8,000 man years of work will be 
created at the building site. Because of the 
nature of building operations, this means 
that many more, probably three or four times 



as many, will be employed during the next 
few years at some stage of the various con- 
struction jobs. 

In addition to the jobs provided at the 
building site, public housing puts people to 
work in the heavy industries producing ma- 
terials and equipment, in shipping, in offices, 
and in drafting rooms. For every two men 
employed at the site, three get jobs in these 
other fields of work. 

Labor has a second major concern in rais- 
ing living conditions. Nothing is more vital 
to Labor than to obtain better homes where 
you can raise your families in healthful sur- 
roundings, and above all at rents that you 
can afford. 

Low-income workers today cannot afford to 
live in a decent home, and yet this is a 
fundamental necessity for a happy family life. 
Yearly earnings are not high enough to pay 
for a safe and sanitary dwelling in addition 
to adequate food, clothing, medical care and 
other necessities of life. In the Housing 
Act, Congress recognized this and provided 
a subsidy to make it possible for low-income 
families to live in decent homes. This sub- 
sidy bridges the gap between what the 
family can afford to pay and what it costs 
to operate dwellings built under the program. 
Contributed by both the federal government 
and the locality, this subsidy results in low 
rents that low-income families can afford. 

In addition to providing homes for low- 
income families, the Housing Act requires 
the elimination of slums. For every dwelling 
built under the public housing program, a 
slum shack must be torn down, boarded up 
or repaired to come within the housing 
standards set by the Act. Instead of grow- 
ing ever larger, this means that our slums 
are beginning to disappear. With the slum 
will go the high disease and death rates, the 
crime and juvenile delinquency and the 
fatalities that result from fires in these areas 
all over the country. 

The third major concern of Labor is the 
general well-being of the nation as a whole. 
Without a healthy and prosperous economy, 
redistribution of wealth is meaningless, nor, 
as we have learned during the last decade, 
can wage standards be maintained. 

Public housing serves to increase the na- 
tional income and adds constantly to the 
improvement of physical standards and the 
total wealth of the nat'on. It helps us be- 
come the $80,000,000,000 a year country that 
our President and all of us want to see. 

The money spent in housing percolates 
through practically every phase of our 
economy. From the production of raw ma- 
terials in forests, quarries and mines, through 
the various processes in plants, mills and 
shops throughout the country, and finally in 
shipping to the building site, private enter- 
prise is stimulated. Through building opera- 
tions the dollar turns over mo^c often than in 
any other industry. And, as this process goes 
on, idle capital and idle machines are put 
to work and jobs are created all along the 
line. 

If we stopped to analyze what happens to 
the wages paid through housing we would 
see local merchants busily ringing up sales 
for food, for clothing, for household furnish- 
ings, etc. And the work created by these 
sales means jobs for boot and shoe workers, 
for textile, for furniture and other workers. 

And all this is accomplished through the 
established agencies of private enterprise, and 
at a relatively small actual public expendi- 
ture. Public housing is a productive under- 
taking. It greases the wheels of our entire 
economy. 

Public housing is thus one of the most 
potent weapons in solving the basic eco- 
nomic problem of our time — that of increas- 



Mas?ichusetts State Federation of Labor 



39 



ing the national income and sccnring its just 
and et|uital)lc distiiljution. On the one han<i 
it provides more cmiiloymenl at fair wages, 
and on the other augments the purchasing 
power of families of low income by the sub- 
sidies which it pays for their benefit. 

These then are the three main concerns of 
Labor, and the public housing program pro- 
vides direct benefits in every case. It pro- 
vides jobs, it provides better homes, and it 
helps build an economy under which Labor 
may protect and extend its gains. I know 
of no other national program which offers 
such widespread benefits. 

In carrying out those portions of the reso- 
lution dealing with organization of labor 
housing committees and representation in 
community housing activities, Labor worked 
hard throughout the country, and you here 
in Massachusetts did your full part. Labor 
took those provisions seriously and the re- 
sults speak for themselves. Here in Massa- 
chusetts you have done better than the rest 
of the country in this respect, with Labor 
well represented on eight of your 10 housing 
authorities. 

But I did not come here merely to con- 
gratulate you on the good work thus far 
accomplished. I did come here today to 
tell you that there is more to be done. In 
the LTnited States as a whole there are 
some 250 local housing authorities, compared 
with 15,000 such bodies in the much smaller 
country, England. In Massachusetts today 
there are only 10 local housing authorities, 
only five of them really active, while there 
should be 50. Certainly there are slums 
that need clearing in all of your cities. Cer- 
tainly there are tens of thousands of families 
that need decent homes. And most cer- 
tainly there is need for more jobs for your 
building trades and other workers. 

I know you have not had an easy time of 
it. Of course there has been opposition from 
many sources. When it comes to providing 
better homes for workers, reactionaries are 
not asleep any more than they were when 
you fought for your right to organize. And 
that fight is not yet over ! 

I say, and I say it with the deepest con- 
viction, that the future of public housing in 
America depends primarily on Labor. If 
public housing moves forward, it will be 
because Labor demands it and fights for it. 
The issues involved are large and very grave. 

Public housing, like all progressive meas- 
ures for which you have fought, is possible 
only under a democratic form of government 
such as ours. The first act of a dictator, 
wherever he arises, is to crush the Organized 
Labor Movement. Dictators are moved to 
take such action because the principles of 
Organized Labor are a direct contradiction 
of that organized despotism which is called 
"dictatorship." Organized Labor must there- 
fore maintain itself by maintaining that 
democratic form of government under which 
alone it can continue to exist. 

The steps taken to develop a housing pro- 
gram in your community serve to strengthen 
the democratic processes. There is no more 
important problem of democracy today than 
to find liberal issues which have a dramatic 
appeal, which are easily understood, and 
which by their nature are difficult for reac- 
tionaries and special interests to successfully 
combat. It is essential that there be put 
forward in America concrete issues that unite 
rather than divide, — issues that rally the vast 
progressive majority of people of all groups. 
Housing is that kind of an issue. It com- 
bines economic desirability with political 
feasibility, and these two must be combined 
if we are to save democracy from forces 
which threaten it throughout the world. 



The l)attlc for housing, like that for 
deninrracy, will be a continuing one. Since 
I outlined this speech a week ago housing 
has suffered a setback — a temporary one 1 
hope, but one which must not be repeated. 

The first phase of the housing program 
already authorized provided funds for about 
100,01)0 houses, a mere drop in the bucket. 
All funds are committed and houses are go- 
ing into construction at the rate of 10,000 
per month. From this session of Congress 
an extension of the housing program was 
asked by that great friend of Labor — Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt. He asked for additional 
authority permitting us to undertake an addi- 
tional 200,000 bouses. These funds were 
imperatively needed, and needed now if we 
are to keep up a steady stream of construc- 
tion. 

After a desperate fight (and Kenneth Tay- 
lor can tell you how desperate it was), we 
lost last Thursday in a House of Represen- 
tatives, tired, anxious to adjourn, and con- 
fused in its mind between housing and lend- 
ing and spending. We lost by a mere 20 
votes — a change of 10 would have given us 
victory. 

This is the first setback for public hous- 
ing since the inauguration of the program. 
This defeat must be reversed in 1940. The 
housing program is a permanent and continu- 
ing one. It must go steadily on year after 
year if we are to abolish our slums and 
provide decent homes for low-income workers. 

Labor will, I am confident, know how to 
deal with those who have marked themselves 
as enemies of Labor by voting against pub- 
lic housing. Labor will see that housing, 
in which it has so vital a concern, marches 
triumphantly on. 

President Morrissey presented Francis 
P. Fenton, Director of Organization, 
American Federation of Labor, with the 
following remarks: 

. The speaker I am about to introduce is 
known to all of us. During the past year 
he received a much-deserved promotion and 
is now in charge of organization activities 
for the American Federation of Labor 
throughout the nation. We are all grateful 
to President Green for the honor bestowed 
upon Frank. He comes here today as Presi- 
dent Green's personal representative to ex- 
tend the greetings of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. It is with genuine pleasure 
that I present your friend and mine, Francis 
P. Fenton, Director of Organization of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Mr. Fenton addressed the convention, 
as follows: 

President Morrissey, officers of the State 
Federation of Labor and fellow and sister 
delegates — It is a pleasure indeed for me 
to return to the State Federation of Labor 
that I owe so much to. I have attended 
the State Federation of Labor conventions 
since a boy, dating back to 1916. I had the 
opportunity of serving such men as Henry 
Sterling, Denny Driscoll, Mike Murphy and 
a host of other splendid leaders who served 
this organization faithfully. One of whom, 
and not the least, was my own father who 
was a Vice-President of this State Federation 
of Labor from 1911 to 1913. As I look 
around this convention, I can see men who 
will be just as great as many of the leaders 
who have gone before. 

My virimary purpose for coming here to- 
day is to ofler my thanks, and the felicita- 
tions and greetings of the American Federa- 



40 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



tion of Labor to the State Federation of 
Labor. You have always served the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor with devotion and 
loyalty. This past year I have been called 
upon from time to time to get some of our 
representatives who were off color and when 
I called upon Nicholas P. Morrissey and 
Kenneth I. Taylor, they met the request of 
the American Federation of Labor promptly 
and with dispatch. 

The American Federation of Labor will, 
before 1940, reach the highest peak in the 
entire history of the American Federation of 
Labor. For a while, with the division in the 
Trade LTnion Movement, we had many who 
didn't know where they stood. We had 
some of them coming in here introducing 
unity resolutions. The reply has and still 
is that the door of the American Federation 
of Labor has been wide open, because we 
know the consequences of a division in our 
Labor Movement. But John L. Lewis has, 
by his own vote, denied the right of the 
rest of the group from bringing about unity. 
His answer was, "I am going out to organize 
the building trades of this nation." Well, 
he couldn't make a better speech for the 
American Federation of Labor, because the 
building trades will meet that challenge, and 
before long. 

The trouble with us has been that we were 
inclined to listen to peeple talk about unity 
and take a soft-hearted position. We will 
have peace, even though we have to fight 
for it. The American Federation of Labor 
is going to put on a fight that will absorb 
the entire C.I.O. 

I have traveled in many states. I have 
seen State Federations of Labor defeated in 
their labor legislation. In progressive states 
like Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, they ap- 
pointed a Labor man, by the way, to show 
they are fair to Labor, and then tied his 
hands with legislation. I can hear the 
whispering in these different states and I can 
catch some of the words that the politicians 
are in the habit of using. Some are "law 
and order," others are "back to normalcy." 

Law and order. What does it mean? Here' 
in Barre we have a textile union that every- 
body tried to organize without success, be- 
cause the company split them into different 
racial groups and keeps them separate. The 
Governor stated that it was his duty to send 
police in to maintain order. It is a question 
to me what is law and order. Has that 
employer got the right to defy the law of 
the land and deny the workers the right 
to organize? Has that employer the right 
to deny the workers the right to their jobs? 
I say that we want a little of this law and 
order for the strikers. We want the official- 
dom of the State of Massachusetts to see 
that the rights of these workers are protected. 

We are growing to an extent that is almost 
beyond imagination. We will continue to 
grow if members of the American Federation 
of Labor will stop listening to people who 
are talking about unity, and bring about 
unity by organizing every unorganized worker 
in their community. We will then have 
peace in the Labor Movement in a very 
short time. 

For two long years the American Federa- 
tion of Labor refused to take over one 
organization oi' local union that belonged to 
the C.I.O. Massachusetts was the first to 
bring back a C.I.O. organization when you 
brought back that splendid group of textile 
worlre'.s in Fisherville. Since then members 
of the C.I.O. are finding that all they get is 
conversation and they are coming back in 
droves from steel, from rubber, and from 
textiles and from other C.I.O. groups. 

I would like to talk to you about a sub- 
ject that I know you must be interested in. 



It is another subject that has been much 
discussed by trade unionists and that is, 
what is the American Federation of Labor's 
attitude on the National Labor Relations 
Board? The American Federation of Labor 
believes in the fundamentals contained in the 
Wagner Act. The American Federation of 
Labor will fight anyone who tries to emascu- 
late the Act. The Federation's only opposi- 
tion is the mal-administration of the law. 

I want to just for a moment point out 
some of the cases. There is the case of the 
teamsters on the West Coast. As in the old 
days, they would not give them a written 
agreement, but there was a definite closed 
shop understanding with their employer. Six 
members of the union refused to meet their 
obligations as members and the union in- 
sisted upon their discharge. And if you 
please the National Labor Relations Board 
took jurisdiction. There was no question of 
interstate commerce involved. The discharge 
of the men was a private matter and the 
only right they had was to go into court if 
there was any wrong done. But lo and be- 
hold, this National Labor Relations Board 
took jurisdiction. They go into every phase 
of the case and tell how it ought to be de- 
termined, but they miss the most important 
factor in the determination of any case and 
that is craft demarkation. These craft unions 
have lived for 60 years. Many of them 
longer. The cigarmakers union just cele- 
brated its 75th anniversary. In the considera- 
tion of a unit, they certainly ought to con- 
sider the craft demarkation, but if they 
continue as they did with the longshoremen's 
case on the West Coast, there will be no 
craft organizations. There are a number of 
other cases. One I remember well. The 
International Association of Machinists had 
two organizations, a local of toolmakers and 
a local of machinists, which is common, and 
the National Labor Relations Board said that 
it was an innovation in the Labor Movement 
to have two of the satne craft in the same 
industry. The trouble is they haven't any- 
body employed there that understands the 
Trade Union Movement. They have a lot 
of theorists who are trying to tell you how 
you ought to run this Trade Union Move- 
ment of yours that you have run so suc- 
cessfully for so many years. 

The Board is now beginning to give con- 
sideration to some of these cases. In other 
words, now that they know we have put the 
pressure on them, they are trying to act 
differently. All the American Federation of 
Labor wants that Act to do is to provide 
a remedy for those who want to organize. 
We don't want any favors, but we don't 
want any other organization favored. That, 
in substance, is what our fight has been 
with the National Labor Relations Board. 

In Congress this year, it was only the 
American Federation of Labor that prevented 
the emasculation of the Wages and Hours 
Law. Our opponents proposed a substitute 
for the bill of the Administration that would 
practically take every right away and would 
have excluded teamsters. There is some- 
thing going on in this country and I hope 
the Administration is not responsible or not 
serious about the differential under the Wage 
and Hour Law between the South and the 
North. I served on the committee. I lis- 
tened to the southern manufacturers. I 
argued and debated with them. All they 
are trying to do is to drive down the wages 
of the workers in the textile industry and 
I assume that is general in all other indus- 
tries. 

That is why I say this convention is im- 
portant. Important for you to carry back to 
your localities what is going on because some- 
times we feel all of this legislation. I some- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



41 



times think the words of Samuel i Gompers 
ought to be remembered more by trade 
unionists, "What the federal Eovcrnment 
gives you they can take away from you." 
I'.clicve me, they are trying to do that in 
the halls of Congress and in many other 
legislatures throughout the country. There is 
only one way to offset it and that is not 
to be satisfied with the progress of your own 
organization only, but go out and build up 
this Trade Union Movement of ours until 
we don't have to beg for anything but de- 
mand it. 

In conclusion I want to say that these 
few days have been happy ones for me to 
come here and meet my many friends. As 
1 go through the states I often think of this 
Trade Union Movement and I can say to 
you without fear of contradiction that we 
have as good a State Federation of Labor 
as there is in this country. And if you will 
give these two splendid officers you have in 
the person of Nicholas P. Morrissey and 
Kenneth I. Taylor the support they deserve, 
I am sure that the next convention will have 
to be in Mechanics Building. Thank you. 

Vice-President Griffin was called to 
the chair. 

Vice-President Griffin introduced Den- 
nis W. Delaney, Massachusetts Adminis- 
trator for the Works Progress Adminis- 
tration, who spoke to the delegates, as 
follows: 

Mr. Chairman, members of the Executive 
Council, ladies and gentlemen — I was born 
and still live in a city which has given to 
the Labor Movement such men as Jim Men- 
zie, Bob Watt, Jimmy Meehan, Matthew 
Maney, Tim O'Neil and a host of others. In 
that area the vigorous and able leadership of 
those men made that area conscious of the 
splendid work done by the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. My family for years have 
been holders of union cards. 1 hold one 
myself in the American Federation of Gov- 
ernment Employees. I came to my new post 
succeeding that able and energetic Colonel 
McDonough who has done such a splendid 
job as State Administrator. I was appointed 
Friday last under the new title of Adminis- 
trator of the Works Projects Administration. 

I came into this office very humble and 
quite conscious of the tremendous task be- 
fore me. The 18 months rule and layoff for 
thirty days was again renewed starting last 
Monday which will result in the dismissal of 
over 14,000 W.P.A. employees in the next few 
days. On top of that I will have to make 
an administrative reduction of 670 employees, 
almost 45 per cent of our present load, and 
to make doubly sure that I will be em- 
ployed nights, we have a quota reduction of 
approximately 13,000 to make by Septem- 
ber 1st. 

I am conscious of the tremendous task I 
have. Be assured that this program adopted 
and passed by Congress under the Act will 
be administered fairly and well. 

I wish to thank the officers of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor for their kind invi- 
tation extended to me. Thank you. 

President Morrissey resumed the 
chair. 

Delegate McCall for the Committee on 
Credentials, rendered the following re- 
port: 



The Credentials Committee has had a meet- 
ing on the case of Delegate Michael F. 
Flaherty of Painters No. 11 of Boston. It 
was brought out at the hearing that Delegate 
Flaherty has been a member of the Painters 
Union for 30 years and recently had been 
acting in the capacity of regional director 
of the C. I. O. for several months, evidently 
with the sanction of his local union. He also 
stated that recently he had resigned from any 
affiliations whatever and has subjected himself 
to the American Federation of Labor, and as 
I stated before, he has no further affiliation 
with and is , not paid in any way by the 
C.I.O. On those grounds and in view of the 
fact that his local union had approved his 
action and they found no fault with his activi- 
ties the committee feels that the delegate 
should be seated and have a voice and vote 
in this convention. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) moved that the report of the 
Committee on Credentials be accepted. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston), speak- 
ing on the matter, said: 

Mr. President and delegates — You have 
heard the report of your committee which 
I interpret as the resignation of Delegate 
Flaherty from the C.I.O. It is well for us 
to understand that these delegates who have 
been employed by the C.I.O., who rendered 
dissension in our Labor Movement, come in 
here through the front door and not through 
the back door, and it is well to think, also, 
that Mr. Flaherty, in his desire to sit with 
us and uphold the principles of our Labor 
Movement, has seceded from the C.I.O. I 
hope and trust that statement comes with 
sincerity of purpose and reaffirmation of his 
fealty and loyalty to the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

The door is open for Delegate Flaherty and 
all others who have wandered from this 
movement and none of us will close that 
door because we have no authority to close 
the door. The door is open. Waiting in 
Washington is a committee from our Federa- 
tion of Labor who will welcome back to the 
fold these men and women who have drifted 
away. Mr. President, I cannot oppose the 
report of your committee, for your committee 
perhaps in its discussion and decision repre- 
sents truly the spirit of our movement as it 
applies to Brother Flaherty and all the others. 
I do hope and trust, however, that the news- 
paper men here in this convention will write 
in headlines the truth, that Brother Michael 
Flahertj' has seen the error of his way* and 
now asks us to accept him back into our 
fold. And let the message be sent out that 
one of the leaders of our iVew England states 
has repudiated the C.I.O. and has knocked 
upon the door of our Federation to return. 

I welcome him back and through him all 
the others who have asked to come back into 
our movement to unite our movement in one 
solid phalanx and fight our common enemies. 
I am only repeating the hope of President 
Green, and you, too, that the great responsi- 
bilities and faith and prestige of our united 
movement will be one of the greatest things 
that ever could be written, the greatest con- 
solidation that will send out a challenge to 
all manufacturers and to all employers asso- 
ciations, that we are one united family ! And 
that splendid face of Mike Flaherty, that fine 
demonstration of the pleasing personality that 
so unclothes when he sneaks will be once 
more heard in his own family, the American 
Federation of Labor. 



42 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Michael Flaherty (Painters No. 11, 
Boston) made the following request: 

May I say one word in order that the dele- 
gates may be under no illusions? I want to 
say I never left the American Federation of 
Labor. I would like the privilege of the floor 
before you act on the committee's report so 
you will know where I stand, and you will 
not be under any illusion as to where I stood 
in my connections with the C.I.O. Then 
you can either accept me or reject me, be- 
cause I am not apologizing for my connection 
with the C.I.O. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenographers No. 
14965, Boston) moved that, in view of the 
statement made by Delegate Flaherty, 
he be granted the privilege of the floor. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) moved that the motion be 
amended by adding "before action is 
taken on the Committee on Credential's 
report". 

The amendment was adopted. 

The motion offered by Delegate Velle- 
man, as amended, was then adopted. 

Michael Flaherty (Painters No. 11, 
Boston) then addressed the convention, 
as follows; 

Mr. Chairman and delegates to this con- 
vention — As the chairman of your Creden- 
tials Committee said, I have been 30 years 
a member of the American Federation of 
Labor. I have been 30 years a loyal mem- 
ber of the American Federation of Labor. 
I haye been 30 years a loyal member of the 
working class movement of America. I have 
been for these 30 years active in every 
phase of Labor's activity where I thought 
my activity would be of any help, and it did 
not enter my mind that my activity would 
affect my future in the American Labor 
Movement. I have been connected with 
movements which were looked upon at times 
as disreputable. I was active on the Sacco- 
Vanzetti Committee. I was active on the 
Scottsboro Committee. I was active on the 
Tom Mooney Defense Committee. And I 
arn not one bit ashamed of my connections 
with these movements. In fact I give all 
my time to these movements and others 
where the problem of workers, whether they 
were associated with the American Fed- 
eration of Labor or whether they were 
struggling to improve their conditions. 
I rendered my assistance to any group of 
workers and I assure you I never will refuse 
to give such help. 

When I associated myself with the C.I.O. 
I did so with the thought and understanding 
it was an organization that was not going to 
invade any field that was already organized, 
and I lived up to that to the very letter 
while I was director in Rhode Island. They 
came into my office, placed their initiation 
fees on the table and asked me to send for 
charters for them. There were musicians, 
there were machinists, painters and many 
others, but I told them that there were 
organizations already established, which had 
been, in fact, established for a good many 
years and that they belonged where the or- 
ganizations did exist. 

I have not been disloyal to the American 
Federation of Labor. My own local union 
sent me here with the largest vote and that 



is no reflection upon the delegates who came 
with me, because after all we are just as 
sympathetic to the aspirations of the C.I.O. 
and any other labor group that tries to 
organize themselves. 

Yes, I recall the Boston Central Labor 
LTnion had a symposium on industrial 
unionism and craft unionism, and you have 
men here today who spoke in favor of in- 
dustrial unionism and yet they sit here today 
and denounce such men as Lewis, Murray, 
and Hillman, and the rest of them. Indus- 
trial unionism is here because this is the age 
of mass production and it is here to stay and 
grow, and will have a place in every human 
activity, and in the Labor Movement. 

Craft unions came into existence because 
they were more in accord with the system of 
production that existed when they were born. 
They were more in accord at that age than 
today. In those days a man was a tool 
worker, a hand worker ; but today they are 
nothing but machine workers with the result 
that you had to have a different form of 
union in the mass production industries. 

I have read the history of the American 
Labor Movement. I have read the history 
of the British Labor Movement, and even 
though you may remove me I want to tell 
you that I am wholeheartedly in sympathy 
with the workers when they organize to 
improve their hours of labor or their con- 
ditions and where they are desirous of having 
a little more secure form of life. I thought 
the C.I.O. and still think the C.I.O. has 
brought new life into the American Labor 
Movement. In fact you cannot deny that 
it has built up your own organizations, it 
stimulated your international officers to go 
out and build up your organizations. It was 
in a sense a very good thing that the C.I.O. 
did come into existence, because just as sure 
as you and I are here today the C.I.O. and 
the A. F. of L. will get together. The 
working class of this nation will have to get 
together and will do so, and here is a reflec- 
tion of how craft unionists feel about the 
C.I.O., proof that they sent me to this con- 
vention as a delegate from Local 11. I be- 
lieve that if the members of the C.I.O. and 
the American Federation of Labor were 
allowed to vote on this question and were 
allowed to settle their differences themselves, 
they would be settled and bring unity in the 
Labor Movement. 



The motion to accept the report of the 
Committee on Credentials was then 
adopted. 

Secretary Taylor read the following 
telegram received from the Portland, 
Maine, Central Labor Union: 



Kenneth I. Taylor 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 

Hotel Bradford, Boston 

Congratulations and best wishes for a most 
successful convention. 

HORACE E. HOWE, President, Port- 
land Central Labor Union 



The convention then adjourned until 
Thursday morning at 9:30. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



43 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1939 



MORNING SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Thursday morning at 9:30 by President 
Morrissey. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of Com- 
mittee on Resolutions, rendered the fol- 
lowing partial report for the committee: 

RESOLUTION NO. 1 

SENIORITY IN BRIDGETENDING 

SERVICE 

Whereas, Promotions and transfers of draw- 
tenders and assistant drawtenders employed 
by the city of Boston have, for the past 
twenty years, with but few exceptions, been 
made according to seniority in service, and 

Whereas, Honorable Maurice J. Tobin, 
mayor of the city of Boston, has approved 
of promotions and transfers by seniority in 
the drawtending service ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor endorse the seniority 
rule as applied to men in the drawtending 
service of the city of Boston and pledge 
wholehearted support for a continuance of 
this system of promotions and transfers and 
the Executive Council and the Secretary- 
Treasurer-Legislative Agent be instructed to 
render all assistance necessary to the Bridge 
Tenders Union, which has been affiliated with 
the State Federation continuously for thirty- 
three years, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions 
be forwarded to His Excellency, Leverett 
Saltonstall, Governor of Massachusetts; Hon. 
Maurice J. Tobin, Mayor of Boston; William 
H. Bixby, Chairman of the Civil Service Com- 
mission; George G. Hyland, Commissioner of 
Public Works, City of Boston, and the Boston 
City Council. 

FRANCIS F. MORSE, 

Bridge Tenders No. 12333, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted, 

RESOLUTION NO. 12 

PURCHASE OF MILK DELIVERED BY 

MEMBERS OF ORGANIZED LABOR 

Whereas, For many years Local No. 380, 
Milk Wagon Drivers and Creamery Workers 
of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chaufifeurs, Stablemen and Helpers has at- 
tempted to unionize the firms of H. P. Hood 
& Sons Company, Noble Milk Company, White 
Brothers Milk Company and Fairfield Farms 
Milk Company, and 

Whereas, They have always met with much 
opposition from these firms, and 

Whereas, These above mentioned firms still 
remain non-union; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention go on record 
urging all affiliated locals to make this fact 
known to their families, friends and sympa- 
thizers, and be it further 

Resolved, That all delegates pledge their sup- 



port to those companies only which employ 
union drivers, members of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stable- 
men and Helpers. 

MILK WAGON DRIVERS No. 380, Bos- 
ton 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 4 

OPPOSITION TO RECIPROCAL 

TRADE PACTS 

Whereas, The secretary of state, Cordell 
Hull, has negotiated reciprocal trade pacts 
with various foreign countries which have 
acted detrimental to the best interests of 
American workers, and 

Whereas, Many American firms have lost 
many orders from their customers to foreign 
firms due to the low cost of production in these 
foreign countries, and the low standard of 
living in comparison to American standards, 
and 

Whereas, These reciprocal trade pacts af- 
fect the textile, woolen, shoe, lumber, metal 
trades and fishing industries, and as time 
goes on, more and more American workmen 
are losing work because of these reciprocal 
trade pacts; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor go on record as opposed 
to the continuance of the reciprocal trade 
pacts, as signed by Secretary of State Cor- 
dell Hull, with foreign countries, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor hold a series of Protest 
Day meetings throughout the state in every 
city where a Central Labor Union is estab- 
lished, for the purpose of informing the citi- 
zens of Massachusetts of the danger of low 
tarift" in these various industries, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That the Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor notify the President of 
the United States, the secretary of state and 
the United States senators and congressmen 
from Massachusetts of the action of this con- 
vention. 

WALTER CENERAZZO, Sea Food 

Workers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 
CLAUDE F. BOCKEN, Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 
JOHN CURLEY, Sea Food Workers 

No. 1572-1, Gloucester 
J. RUSSELL MARTIN, Sea Food 
Workers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) spoke on the 
matter, as follows: 

The purpose of this resolution is to pro- 



44 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



tect an ancient industry which is to be vitally 
affected. We have an organization in the 
city of Gloucester vi^hich was organized about 
14 months ago. We have gone to Washing- 
ton to fight these reciprocal trade pacts and 
our Representatives were cooperative in assist- 
ing us also, but a reciprocal trade pact went 
into effect, however, which will mean that 
about 600 people of our organization will loaf 
five or six months during the year. 

We had about 165 plants about 10 years 
ago. Today we have less than 85. If sorne- 
thing isn't done to protect the American in- 
dustry from foreign products coming in here, 
it will be a sad situation. The Gorton Pew 
fisheries announced recently they had received 
a subsidy to open a plant in New Brunswick. 
Those products are brought into this country 
in competition with American goods and even 
though today there is more fish consumed in 
the United States than ever before, we find 
less and less employment among organized 
fishery employees. We are facing a problem 
where a foreign government comes in here 
and takes these industries away. They gave 
us a quarter of a million dollars to build a 
new fish pier in Gloucester and then turned 
around and did this. I hope this convention 
will go out and spread the gospel of a high 
tariff and also that these protests will be as 
successful in other parts as they were in 
Gloucester two weeks ago when we had 2500 
people on the fish pier in Gloucester in pro- 
test. 

Our industry is not the only one that will 
be affected. The shoe industry, the paper in- 
dustry, and many others, and I sincerely hope 
that the delegates will realize the seriousness 
of this situation and protect Massachusetts 
industries, because if we don't, they will move 
out of this state and mi ^y of our members 
will lose their jobs. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenograpners No. 
14965, Boston) spoke on Resolution No. 
4, as follows: 

In the absence of Delegate McHugh of the 
Fishermen's Union of Boston, I would like 
to register my protest in their behalf and 
support the resolution of the Sea Food Work- 
ers of Gloucester. It may be interesting, 
while not to the point, to answer some of 
the comments made in the morning Globe, 
that we also have in Boston a local union 
of 2700 dues-paying members on the Atlantic 
with membership in Gloucester, New Bedford 
and Boston. These men are working under 
strict closed shop agreements. There are 
conditions in the agreements unheard of in 
the fishing industry and it took these work- 
ers, with the assistance of the American 
Federation of Labor and the State Federation 
of Labor, 11 months to attain that end, 
which is not the end but just a beginning of 
what they desire. I want to say that these 
men were organized and supposed to be in 
the C.I.O., sometime near the end of 1937 
or the beginning of 1938. There was refer- 
ence made here yesterday, and it was very 
much emphasized that if the workers of the 
American Federation of Labor were given 
the right to vote, they would settle the prob- 
lem between the C.I.O. and the A. F. of L. 
I want to say that these workers voted on the 
question of remaining in the C.I.O. or going 
into the A. F. of L. and they voted 1500 for 
the A. F. of L. and about 340 for the C.I.O. 

They are in good standing in the American 
Federation of Labor and are a fine group of 
workers. They are depending, too, upon the 
action of this and every other convention 
for protection. Every move we make to 
better the conditions of the fishermen at sea, 
a most hazardous occupation as they don't 



know when they go out whether they will 
come back, we are confronted with the argu- 
ment from employers that if we curb 
Canadian competition we can get better con- 
ditions for ourselves. I do trust the resolu- 
tion will be carried unanimously. It is up 
to us to protect these industries. 

The motion was then adopted. 

President Morrissey then presented 
John L. Barry, President of the New 
Hampshire State Federation of Labor, 
who addressed the delegates, as follows: 

President Morrissey and delegates to this 
54th annual convention of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor — May I bring 
the wishes of my State Federation of Labor 
for a most successful convention here in 
Boston? You know as we go to the north 
in the New England states, we sometimes 
and many times receive inspiration from the 
conventions that are held by the Massa- 
chusetts State Branch. We appreciate very 
keenly the invitation extended not only to 
our state but to other New England states 
to participate as guests at this convention. 
However, I speak for my own state, more 
particularly because I have had that pleasure 
almost continuously for the past 12 or 15 
years. I say it has given me inspiration in 
the past and I am sure that we are going to 
receive the same inspiration in the future. 

Those of us who have been chosen to carry 
on for Labor must realize that one of our 
great tasks is to plan, not so much for the 
present, but for the future. It was very 
aptly asked by a speaker on this platform 
yesterday, "Where are we going and how 
are we going after 1940?" After seeing the 
record of the American Federation of Labor 
and knowing something of its past achieve- 
ments and if we plan now in our various 
state branch conventions, and if those plans 
are completed or brought to our national 
convention, we won't have to worry about 
where we are going. It has been called to 
our attention, and we know it to be true, 
that we cannot depend upon legislation en- 
tirely, but rather depend upon the forces of 
our economic strength through organization. 
We have seen it happen — what the govern- 
ment gives you, the government can take 
from you. 

I know I have received a very distinct 
courtesy from the chairman of your Resolu- 
tions Committee. Having that in mind and 
knowing that I probably will be with you 
at some other date, and also hoping that 
the fine program we started here in Boston 
of having delegates from the various state 
federations of labor in New England meet 
annually, I am going to bring my little talk 
to a close. Once again I wish you the 
greatest success in your deliberations and 
hope that you achieve the greatest amount 
of value from those deliberations. I want to 
thank you for the invitation extended to me 
on behalf of my organization to be present 
and participate in this convention. 

President Morrissey announced that 
because Delegate Mara (Boot and Shoe 
Workers "O", Boston) was obliged to 
leave the convention on business, Dele- 
gate Goggin (Boot and Shoe Workers 
No. 138, Boston) would serve in his place 
as a member of the Committee on Reso- 
lutions. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, continued: 



Massachusetts State ^'ederation of Labor 



45 



RESOLUTION NO. 31 
LEOPOLD MORSE COMPANY'S ATTI- 
TUDE TOWARD ORGANIZED LABOR 

Whereas, The representatives of the Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Council of the 
Metropolitan District have endeavored lo se 
cure an opportunity of discussing labor policy 
with officials of Leopold Morse Company, as 
it relates to alteration, maintenance and con- 
struction work on properties of the company, 
and have met with refusal, and 

Whereas, Leopold Morse Company on 
several occasions have employed non-union 
labor at wages greatly btlow the prevailing 
rates of wages and under conditions that 
were not in conformity with the established 
working conditions in effect in agreements 
between employers and union labor engaged 
in general construction work; therefore, be it 
Resolved, That because of the attitude of 
Leopold Morse Company, wc notify members 
and friends of Organized Labor, "do not 
patronize Leopold Morse Company, who do 
not employ union building and construction 
trades workers and are not interested in em- 
ploying labor under union conditions." 

E. A. JOHNSON, Asbestos Workers No. 

6, Boston 
FRANK O'TOOLE, Plasterers No. 10, 

Boston 
ANDREW BURT, Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Burt (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) spoke, as follows: 

I would like to hear the opinion of Delegate 
Johnson of the Building Trades Council on 
this matter. The painters of Boston are 
vitally interested in the Leopold Morse Com- 
pany, in fact in my opinion it has always 
been the fairest clothing company to Or- 
ganized Labor in the city of Boston, both so 
far as buying union made clothing is con- 
cerned and as far as using our members. 
I would like to hear Delegate Johnson's 
opinion so that I can act properly on the 
matter. 

President Morrissey stated that he had 
recognized Delegate Sidd (United Gar- 
ment Workers No. 1, Boston), but would 
allow Delegate Johnson to speak on the 
matter immediately after Delegate Sidd, 
if he desired. 

Delegate Sidd (United Garment Work- 
ers No. 1, Boston) spoke, as follows: 

I will venture to say that there isn't a 
man on the floor of this convention who has 
been in closer touch with the Leopold Morse 
Company for the past 35 years than I. I 
have been representing my local organization 
and have done business with that firm for 
that length of time and have gotten along 
fairly well with them. I will say that Or- 
ganized Labor has been staunch and loyal 
in the support of our label as far as that 
concern of Leopold Morse was concerned. 
They received the patronage, and although 
they usually grumbled about not getting suf- 
ficient Union Labor support, I know they 
always got the support of Organized Labor. 

In 1915 the Leopold Morse Company left 



our organization and signed up with the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. 
Three months elapsed and this same firm 
practically got on their knees to renew rela- 
tionship with our organization. One of their 
salesmen, who covers the California district, 
made his whole trip without selling a bill 
of goods and finally they came back to our 
organization. Wc got along with them since 
then until the first of this year, at which 
time, through no fault of our national or- 
ganization, our local union turned to the 
C.I.O. We ought to give this firm a lesson. 
Put them on the "unfair list" and I will 
tell you they will feel it. I know that since 
the first of the year they have suffered a tre- 
mendous loss of business. I hope this reso- 
lution will be adopted. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) spoke on the resolution, 
as follows: 

This isn't a fight between the C.I.O. and 
the A. F. of L. It has been a constant 
source of irritation for our building trades 
unions. Unfortunately in many instances 
we find a product advertised as being union, 
then we find that the same company uses 
non-union labor in the maintenance or con- 
struction and repair of their property. Re- 
cently the painters union called to our at- 
tention a grievance they had against the 
Leopold Morse Company at the Summer 
Street store, where they worked men Satur- 
day and Sunday at wages 50 per cent lower 
than the prevailing rate. We took it up 
with the manager of this company and they 
refused to do anything. Then we went to 
Mr. Morse, the treasurer of the company, 
without success, and then we called him on 
the 'phone and failed to get any response. 
There is nothing left for us to do. 

For 27 years I have purchased my cloth- 
ing and that of my children at the Leopold 
Morse Company. In that period I have 
only traded with two salesmen in that store. 
They realize this will also reflect on them. 
Mrs. Van Vaerenewyck will tell you about 
the trouble she has had in attempting to 
organize the clerks. We can't afTord to take 
our union money and purchase clothing in 
that store when they absolutely will not be 
consistent with the policies of Organized 
Labor. I hope the resolution will be adopted. 

Delegate Van Vaerenewyck (Retail 
Store Clerks No. 796, Boston) spoke on 
Resolution No. 31, as follows: 

I want to say that this firm is absolutely 
unfair to Organized Labor. We have a case 
in the State Department of Labor where 
they won't even pay $14.50 per week to 
young boys. A young man in there came 
to us and asked us to organize them. When 
we called a meeting the Leopold Morse Com- 
pany posted notices on the clock and called 
a company union meeting for the same time. 
I want to tell the people here who patronize 
this firm that they want our money but they 
do not want to pay dues or belong to the 
American Federation of Labor. Two 

stenographers took the records of the com- 
pany union meeting and when the vote was 
taken they first put up their hands to vote 
for the union and the man in charge called 
for another vote. 

We took the case to the National Labor 
Relations Board and were defeated. These 
fine gentlemen voted for the company union. 
I for one will be very happy, and the interna- 
tional union that I represent also, if we 
can put the Leopold Morse Company on the 



46 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



"we don't patronize list," and I bet before 
the next convention, we will have every one 
of their stores organized, because they do 
depend on Organized Labor for their 
patronage. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Russell continued his report 
for the Committee on Resolutions: 



RESOLUTION NO. 27 

DECISION OF MAINE PUBLIC 
UTILITIES COMMISSION 

Whereas, the Maine Public Utility Com- 
mission has recently revealed itself as a 
strike-breaking agency, using the most un- 
scrupulous tactics in order to defend the 
long-standing but now tottering alliance be- 
tween chiseling employers, conniving cham- 
bers of commerce and reactionary public 
officials in that state, and 

Whereas, The Maine Public Utility Com- 
mission has abused its authority to protect 
an exploiting anti-union truck operator 
against whom a strike is in process by order- 
ing three legitimate trucking companies to 
handle his scab business during the duration 
of the strike under threat of losing their right 
to operate in that state, and 

Whereas, The labor movement of Massa- 
chusetts cannot tolerate the destruction of the 
right of workers to organize by such under- 
handed and illegal abuse of power by an official 
agency of a neighboring state, and 

Whereas, Persistence in such union baiting 
tactics must force our members to place the 
vacationland of Maine on our "Don't pat- 
ronize" list and would cause our affiliated 
organization to take direct action against the 
handling of this scab business ; therefore, be it 
Resolved, By the 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor that the Secretary be instructed to 
request Governor Barrows of Maine to inter- 
cede at once with the Public Utilities Com- 
mission to withdraw its improper and sinister 
strike-breaking order, and be it further 

Resolved, That the International Represen- 
tative of the Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Stablemen and Helpers be in- 
structed to deliver this message to Governor 
Barrows. 

P. HARRY JENNINGS, Laundry Driv- 
ers No. 168, Boston 
NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Drivers 

No. 168, Boston 
ALBERT W. FUCHS, Teamsters No. 

646, Boston 
JAMES J. MAHONEY, Teamsters No. 

203, Boston 
DAVID SANDLER, Teamsters No. 831, 

Boston 
JOHN J. KEARNEY, Hotel and Res- 
taurant Employees No. 34, Boston 
THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Un- 
ion, Boston 
JOHN C. HURLEY, Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston 
ABRAHAM PEARLSTEIN, Newspaper 

Chauffeurs No. 259, Boston 
M. J. O'DONNELL, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 
JOHN F. DONOVAN, Teamsters No. 

68, Boston 
JOHN J. DUFFY, Teamsters No. 68, 

Boston 
FRANK CAHALANE, Teamsters No. 

68, Boston 
MARTIN MORAN, Teamsters No. 68, 

Boston 
JOHN J. MURPHY, Bricklayers No. 6, 
Worcester 



AARON VELLEMAN, Stenographers 
No. 14965, J?oston 

JOHN J. DEL MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 

THOMAS J. POWERS, Teamsters No. 
829, Boston 

NATHAN A. HIGGINS, Teamsters No. 
25, Boston 

EDWARD F. JENKINS, Teamsters No. 
25, Boston 

RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 
477, Lawrence 

JAMES P. MEEHAN, Painters No. 44, 
Lawrence 

WALTER CENERAZZO, Seafood Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 

ROBERT BURNS, Engineers No. 75, 
Worcester 

NICHOLAS P. MORRISSEY, Team- 
sters No. 25, Boston 

ANDREW D'AMBROSIO, Teamsters 
No. 25, Boston 

ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Plate 
Boys, Paper Handlers ^nd Press 
Clerks No. 21, Boston 

JOHN M. SULLIVAN, Teamsters No. 
25, Boston 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK, Team- 
sters No. 170, Worcester 

JOHN M. SHEA, Street Carmen No. 22, 
Worcester 

PHILIP F. COYLE, Central Labor 
Union, Worcester 

LEONARD A. RYAN, Teamsters No. 
170, Worcester 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

President Morrissey announced that a 
brief had been filed by Delegate Jennings 
(Laundry Drivers No. 168, Boston) in 
connection with Resolution No, 27, 
which was in the hands of the Secre- 
tary, and requested that it be read. 

Secretary Taylor read the brief, as fol- 
lows: 

I have just returned from Maine where T 
went to investigate conditions, which I found 
to be appalling. Our union organizers have 
been in that state enrolling members of 
our locals. Maine labor as never before is 
union conscious. The latest campaign was 
and is being carried on in and around 
Bangor. We organized and had as mernbers 
of one intrastate trucking concern a majority 
of its employees. Our business agent exer- 
cised great patience in an endeavor to arrange 
for a definite day to talk with owners of 
this concern regarding wages and hours, but 
without success. The employees of this 
concern, less than a majority, went and now 
are on strike, and their places are filled by 
strikebreakers. The offending concern offered 
its merchandise to three union concerns for 
transportation, but it was refused, because 
their union employees declined to handle mer- 
chandise in concert with strikebreakers. 

The offending concern then complained to 
the Public Utilities Commission praying that 
because of the failure to transport their 
goods the license of the three concerns be 
suspended or revoked. A hearing was had, a 
managing representative of each of the three 
allegedly oft'ending companies appeared, not 
represented by counsel and testified that, he, 
in each instance had refused to handle the 
merchandise of the offending concern, because 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



47 



a strike of their employees was threatened. 
This was not an accurate statement, thougli 
it may be, that their interpretation of the 
union lruci< drivers' refusal to act as strike- 
breakers may have been so interpreted. The 
public utilities at the conclusion of the hear- 
ing announced that a "show cause order" 
would issue at once to decide whether the 
licenses of the alleged offenders would be 
suspended or revoked. 

This ruling, unheard of heretofore in labor 
circles, has caused union men much uneasi- 
ness. It is equivalent to an order or the 
ultimatum of the utilities commission that 
union employees must work with strike- 
breakers, a function never before undertaken 
by courts of law or equity. The doctrine of 
these courts being that men have a right 
to work or not to work with strikebreakers 
or hostile associates if that be the desire 
of the men themselves, and such a doctrine is 
firmly established in Maine. 

Another aspect of the hostile attitude of 
business toward Organized I^abor is the fact 
that some members of the Bangor Chamber 
of Commerce have been soliciting business 
for the non-union strikebreaking concern. 

We apprehend that some members of the 
Truckmen Employer's Association are back 
of the present movement to annihilate 
unionism ; members of the association are 
known to have taken part in long conferences 
with at least one of the trucking concerns 
proceeded against before the utilities com- 
mission ; the secretary of the association has 
been to the State House successfully solicit- 
ing for the strikebreaking concerns, the 
transportation of relief supplies. 

The employees' union offered to furnish one 
of the concerns proceeded against, at its ex- 
pense, competent counsel to act for the 
alleged offender at the hearing before the 
utilities commission but this offer was refused 
without a reason. In Bangor it is openly 
charged and alleged that the newspapers 
there were threatened with a loss of adver- 
tising space if they gave the union side of 
the dispute any favorable publicity, and 
whether true or not the union side of the 
controversy has not been made public. 

We now serve notice, that union em- 
ployees will not serve as strikebreakers ; that 
merchandise conveyed by this offending con- 
cern may be accepted by any and all 
unionized trucking concerns at their own 
risk, but it will not be moved into or out 
of the receiving terminals by union men, 
regardless of the Public Utilities Commis- 
sion's order or decree. If any unionized 
concern seeks to compel union men to handle 
strikebreaking merchandise, their men will 
be asked to choose between the union and 
the employer. 

Preparations for a state-wide strike vote 
are now getting under way. The situation 
in Maine will be presented to our conven- 
tion which meets in Boston on August 7th, 
1939. It may mean a state-wide tieup of all 
truck transportation, and if this comes, we 
expect to have the aid and cooperation of all 
union truckmen in Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire. 

We deplore strikes, but we recognize that 
there are times when it is the only weapon 
at hand with which to meet oppression. If 
a general strike order should issue, the state 
of Maine will be isolated ; its summer tourist 
business ruined to the great loss of its citi- 
zens. This we wish to avoid if humanly pos- 
sible but we will not purchase peace at the 
cost of the hard earned advance in wages 
and shortened hours. 

We do not understand the attitude of the 
members of the Bangor Chamber of Com- 
merce. Our effort is to obtain decent living 
wages; to reduce the hours of labor for men 



driving trucks to a reasonable maximum that 
they may not be a menace to our highways; 
to provide employment for men now out of 
work; to place men in charge of merchan- 
dise, in transit, who are and must, if they 
are to remain in the union, be honest and 
sober. Surely these objectives are com- 
mendable. Our union employers are suffer- 
ing because of the cut-throat competition of 
certain companies paying low wages and 
work their men many hours over the maxi- 
i7ium per week allowed by law. Non-union 
truck owners work their men 60 hours a 
week and pay but $25 a week. Union em- 
ployers pay a wage of $35 for a 48-hour 
week. We owe these union employers a duty 
which we will fully discharge. 

I further declare that a public utilities 
commission which permits itself to be used as 
a cat's paw for a strikebreaking trucking 
concern ; an employer's association ; a Cham- 
ber of Commerce and controlled newspapers 
cannot stop the onward march of unionism. 
We have a weapon in our arsenal which, if 
used, will cause these cancerous forces to 
crumple and beg for mercy as their busi- 
nesses topple around their heads. The unions 
are in earnest and rebellious because of the 
unfair tactics employed in Maine. 

When assembled the men will be asked to 
vote on and authorize a strike of all union 
employees who are required or requested to 
move merchandise forwarded or handled by 
any and all strikebreakers. 

The last bit of proof at hand of an attempt 
to put the union to the acid test, lies in the 
fact that the three concerns proceeded against 
before the utilities commission, have capitu- 
lated and notified the utilities commission that 
they would accept freight from the strike- 
breakers, and the threatened "show cause 
order" having accomplished its purpose has 
been abrogated. Union employees of these 
three concerns must now choose, between the 
union which procured for them decent living 
wages and reasonable working hours, and 
the forces which would reduce their wages 
to the lowest possible point and increase their 
hours of work to the limit permissible under 
the law. 

I am to return to Maine shortly and pro- 
pose then to solicit the support and sympa- 
thy of all unions in what promises to be a 
fight to end oppression of labor unions. Ours 
is a righteous cause, and I am sure that 
the fair-minded men and women of Maine, 
will help us, by shipping and ordering their 
merchandise shipped by union carriers. 

Maine is not a backward state, however, 
its politicians have not progressed beyond the 
stone age ; they in their newly-acquired 
wealth and power consider themselves of the 
anointed caste and look upon laboritig men 
as of caste little higher than beasts of 
burden. 

Delegate Jennings (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) then spoke on the mat- 
ter, as follows: 

This situation in INIaine is a very serious 
one. We have an excellent organization in 
Portland and the majority of the carriers 
run from Portland to Bangor. I was called 
in about two weeks ago and I found these 
conditions as were read by Secretary Taylor. 
The organization is withholding action until 
such time as this resolution is presented to 
this body. We couldn't get any publicity. 
The papers were afraid to print any news 
I'ecause they might lose their advertisers. I 
never heard of any commission exceeding the 
authority vested in them as has been done in 
Augusta, Maine. The commission's action 
has been circulated throughout the state of 



48 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Maine and all the employers who had been 
doing business with labor organizations took 
advantage of it. They said, "What are we 
going to do? We have to do this or we will 
lose our permit to operate." 

I am sure that if we get proper publicity, 
we will get some results. My question is, 
has the public utilities cornmission the au- 
thority to issue a decision like that and try 
to drive our organization out of business? 
We have organizations in Vermont, New 
Hampshire and Massachusetts, and if they 
are going to try and put the Maine organiza- 
tions out of business, then the organizations 
will all go down the line together. 

Delegate O'Donnell (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) spoke on Resolution No. 27, as 
follows: 

I wonder if the delegates realize what they 
are trying to do in the state of Maine? If 
they are allowed to get away with this propo- 
sition, the truck driver is the first on the 
list and then they will take one union after 
another. But in my humble opinion they 
started with the wrong organization, because 
the transportation organizations are not 
going to stand idly by and allow anybody to 
try to weaken any of our small organiza- 
tions. But the point is this, Mr. Chairman, 
the Chambers of Commerce groups and the 
employer groups are picking out the state 
of Maine. They threatened to take the utili- 
ties plates away from operators if they didn't 
service the non-union operator. They have 
tried every other way of wrecking the Or- 
ganized Labor Movement. 

I know what would happen if they wanted 
to do that in Massachusetts. But they went 
to the state of Maine and if they are suc- 
cessful, the powerful employer group and the 
Chambers of Commerce of New England will 
try the same thing elsewhere. It is most 
dangerous, in my opinion, and it is up to the 
Labor Movement ; not only the transporta- 
tion organizations, but every organization 
within the confines of New England. It was 
through the efforts of the transportation 
unions in the state of Maine that made it 
possible, in my opinion, for organization to 
grow in that state. We want the resolution 
and your cooperation. When they try to 
enjoin the transportation trades they are go- 
ing to be up against a fight. In the mean- 
time every delegate should take this home to 
his organization and make a careful study of 
it, because you may have some branch of 
your organization in the state of Maine that 
may sometime be up against the same 
proposition. I hope the resolution passes 
unanimously. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 76 

MERIT RATING AMENDMENT TO 

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

ACT 

Whereas, The Governor last week submit- 
ted to the Legislature a bill to amend the 
unemployment compensation law which con- 
tains many changes injurious to the welfare 
of the workers insured under that law, and 

Whereas, The Advisory Council which is 
said to have sponsored these recommenda- 
tions contains no representative of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, The major recommendation con- 
tained in that bill is one openly described 
as originating in the Associated Industries 
of Massachusetts which would establish a so- 
called employer's merit rating plan, and 



Whereas, The American Federation has 
long and vigorously opposed plans to reduce 
the revenues out of which the still inade- 
quate benefit payments are being made to 
unemployed workers, and 

Whereas, The unemployment insurance 
system represents one of the greatest ac- 
complishrnents of the New Deal on behalf 
of Organized Labor, and must be defended 
by our members against the well-financed 
lobby of reactionary employers ; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor reiterate our vigorous opposition to 
the proposed sabotage of the unemployment 
compensation fund, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Secretary-'Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent be instructed to take any 
necessary steps to prevent the reduction of 
revenues or the impairment of workers' rights 
under our state unemployment compensation 
law, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution 
be forwarded to Governor Saltonstall, and 
members of the ways and means committee 
of the House of Representatives. 

KENNETH I. TAYLOR, Typographical 
No. 216, Springfield 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved that the 
recommendation of the committee be 
adopted. 



Secretary Taylor spoke on Resolution 
No. 76, as follows: 

I simply want to say a few words relative 
to the merit system, about which I briefly 
spoke during my remarks the other day. 
Governor Saltonstall has sent to the Legis- 
lature a message designed and sponsored by 
Associated Industries, the organization which 
is interested in having what we know to be 
a merit rating system under the Unemploy- 
ment Compensation Law. It e.xists in several 
other states. But notwithstanding that fact, 
the American Federation of Labor is unaltera- 
bly opposed to a merit rating system. The 
Advisory Council of the Division of Unem- 
ployment Compensation, on which the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor has no 
representative, has recommended this merit 
rating plan. In fact they have devoted most 
of their time to employers' requests and 
wishes, leaving those in need of prompt pay- 
ment of benefits high and dry. 

What will the situation be under this 
merit rating plan? There will be a definite 
tendency on the part of employers to 
freeze employment, so to speak, in order to 
obtain a good employment record — no layoffs 
— thus they will be able to apply for and 
very likely get a reduction in their contri- 
bution to the Unemployment Compensation 
Fund. Had they frozen employment in 1929 
or at a time when very few were unemployed, 
that would be one thing. But to freeze em- 
ployment when 10,000,000 people need em- 
ployment is very dangerous, in my opinion. 
Under this system you would see the textile, 
the boot and shoe, and all other businesses 
which can be considered as seasonal trades 
and which operate on the basis of the orders 
they receive, paying 2.7 per cent from now 
on. On the other hand you would see the 
power interests and insurance interests and 
some of the bigger manufacturers enjoying a 
reduction at the expense of those who 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



49 



operate seasonal businesses — seasonal because 
of reasons over which they have no control. 

A short time ago our attention vifas called 
to an employer who began freezing employ- 
ment, so to speak. Apparently this particu- 
lar employer wanted to establish a good 
employment record so that he would benefit 
under a merit rating plan, when it was 
adopted. He had about enough work to take 
care of 50 per cent of his normal force. He 
used his employees three and one-half days 
every other week, just enough to render 
each individual ineligible for benefits under 
the Unemployment Compensation Act, be- 
cause under our Act, until this year, it was 
necessary to wait two consecutive weeks be- 
fore being eligible for benefits. Of course 
they came to our office and wanted to know 
what could be done. Technically, the em- 
ployer was within his rights, but as far as 
the spirit of the law was concerned, it was 
wrong. Finally, after several conferences 
with the employer, to whom was suggested 
the possibility of a picket line, as unique as 
such might be, proper arrangements were 
made to permit his employees to serve their 
waiting period, uninterrupted, and thus be 
eligil3le for benefits when idle. 

That is an illustration of what can happen 
under the merit rating system. Employers 
will not take on extra employees who may 
have to be discharged later — not if they can 
avoid it. They will give overtime in some 
instances to their permanent help, which 
means the door will be closed to many who 
are without employment. This is a vicious 
proposition. Employers, with their business 
agents in the Governor's office who evidently 
encouraged him to recommend this to the 
Legislature, are hard at work. I sincerely 
hope this resolution will be adopted and 
thus have the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor support the American Federation of 
Labor against the so-called merit rating plan 
for employers. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 75 

FAILURE TO RETAIN JAMES P. 
MEEHAN in division OF UNEM- 
PLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

Whereas, Under the Unemployment Compen- 
sation Law as reorganized. Labor had a pro- 
vision inserted by agreement into the bill, that 
one deputy director shall be a labor relations 
man with the understanding that Commissioner 
James P. Meehan, the Labor representative on 
the commission, would continue to serve as 
Labor's representative under the new title, and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts Federation of 
Labor submitted the name of James P. Meehan 
to Governor Saltonstall and urged his appoint- 
ment as Labor Relations Representative under 
the new set-up. This position was never filled 
according to Labor's understanding and ex- 
pectations and the duties were assigned to the 
deputy director in charge of employment of- 
ficers, an arrangement unsatisfactory to the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, Jim Meehan as Senate Chairman 
of the Joint Committee on Labor and Indus- 
tries that reported this Bill favorably in the 
1935 session of the Legislature, at that time 
had the foresight and courage to strongly oppose 
the compulsory employees' contribution and 
continued his fight against this provision from 
one session to another until it was finally 
eliminated from the law, saving the workers 
in this state millions of dollars in their wages, 
and 

Whereas, He strongly advocated a reduction 
in the waiting period that was enacted into 



law, again benefiting the many thousands of 
unemployed, and 

Whereas, Jim Meehan as Commissioner 
fought for the claimants to be allowed to earn 
up to five dollars in their regular places of 
employment and be entitled to benefits until 
this regulation was adopted, and 

Whereas, As a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature, both in the Senate and House of 
Representatives, he was the best champion 
Labor ever had, and while he was Senate 
Chairman of the Joint Committee on Labor and 
Industries more bills favorable to Labor were 
reported by the Committee and enacted into 
law than at any other similar period in the 
history of our Commonwealth, and 

Whereas, Jim Meehan is recognized as 
Labor's friend and an authority on Labor 
legislation, having been appointed by previous 
governors to represent Massachusetts at na- 
tional and interstate conferences on labor legis- 
lation, and 

Whereas, While a member of the Senate, his 
appointment to the Unemployment Compensa- 
tion Commission was unsolicited by him and 
recommended by the Massachusetts Federation 
of Labor to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Robert J. Watt, and 

Whereas, At the time of his appointment the 
Commission was supposed to have been pre- 
pared to pay benefits; an emergency existed; 
armories were crowded with unemployed regis- 
tering and entering claims for benefits. The 
volume and pressure of claims was far greater 
than had been anticipated, whether in Massa- 
chusetts or Washington, and notwithstanding 
this fact Jim Meehan withheld public criticism 
and applied himself to the duties of the office 
with sincerity and honesty. His efforts were 
greatly responsible in improving the service to 
the unemployed, and his door was open for 
advice, counsel, and assistance, and 

Whereas, It is with regret that politics 
should have played such a prominent part in 
the present set-up that the labor movement 
were to be denied the courteous treatment and 
valuable assistance of Jim Meehan in the ad- 
ministration of the Unemployment Compensa- 
tion Law, notwithstanding the appeals from the 
thousands of workers in the Commonwealth for 
his retention; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor in convention assembled go 
on record expressing our bitter disappointment 
to Governor Saltonstall for his failure to retain 
Commissioner James P. Meehan in the position 
of deputy director in charge of labor relations 
as requested by Labor in the LTnemployment 
Compensation Administration, a man who has 
the utmost confidence and respect of the work- 
ing people in Massachusetts, regardless as to 
political parties, and well informed on Social 
Security; and be it further 

Resolved, That copies of, this resolution he 
sent to Governor Saltonstall and to the Social 
Security Board and the Director of LTnera- 
ployment Compensation in Washington, D. C. 

FRANK C. BURKE. Lathers Union No. 

142, Waltham 
JOHN P. McCarthy, Retail Clerks No. 

1445, Boston 
OTIS SMITH. Retail Clerks No. 1435. 

Lynn 
ARMAND LONARDO, Retail Clerks No. 

232, Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JAMES H. SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 

90, Lawrence 



50 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 

Boston 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 441. 

Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 

Handlers, Plate Boys and Press 

Clerks No. 21, Boston 
ANGUS MacLEAN, Carpenters No. 275, 

Newton 
ADAM KURTZ, Carpenters No. 1372, 

Easthampton 
MICHAEL J. O'DONNELL, Teamsters 

No. 25, Boston 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers No. 

66, Boston 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Workers 

No. 66. Boston 
HERBERT S. FERRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. 223, Brockton 
JAMES MAHER, Teamsters No. 829, 

Somerville 
GEORGE STACK, Teamsters No. 829, 

Somerville 
THOMAS J. POWERS, Teamsters No. 

829, Somerville 
DANIEL J. COLLINS, Central Labor 

Union, Norwood 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 

Cooks No. 186, Boston 
HOWARD H. LITCHFIELD, Central 

Labor Union, Cambridge 
HARRY W. JOEL, Central Labor 

Union, Cambridge 
JOHN J. DelMONTE, Teamsters No. 

379, Boston 
NATHAN A. HIGGINS, Teamsters No. 

25, Boston 
FRANK J. HALLORAN, Teamsters No. 

25, Boston 
TIMOTHY J. HARRINGTON, Team- 
sters No. 25, Boston 
JOHN MAHONEY, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Vice-President Doyle was called to the 
chair. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) spoke on Resolution No. 
75, as follows: 

This resolution covers the situation very 
well. In order to supplement the resolution, 
I call to the attention of the delegates that 
the reorganization of the LInemployment Com- 
pensation Commission, perfected after agree- 
ment with our Legislative Agent and officers 
of our State Federation of Labor, provided 
for the retention of James P. Meehan. At 
that time the newspapers were filled with 
castigations against the Board because of 
slow payments and the delay, et cetera, but 
no fault was ever found with Jim Meehan. 

If he had not been given that appointment 
and the promise to be kept there, Jim Mee- 
han would still be representing Labor in the 
Massachusetts Senate from the Essex District. 
He would be serving us in the capacity of 
labor representative at the State House. Jim 
Meehan was ousted from his position even 
though there was no fault with him, nothing 
against him. 

I talked to the Governor about him myself 
and he said, "I have the greatest respect for 
him, and I prornise to give him something 
later on." We in the state building trades 
have had him as our secretary-treasurer and 
if we were able to do so, we would place 



him on the payroll permanently. He receives 
some small compensation for the work he 
performs. I say to you that if Jim Meehan 
was in there in any capacity, the merit 
rating clause which was endorsed by the Ad- 
visory Council would never have received his 
approval, and he wouldn't have to face the 
fact that they had endorsed that report which 
has gone to the Governor. 

We can't urge too strongly the reappoint- 
ment of James Meehan. Time and again I 
have heard delegates stand on this floor and 
commend him for his activities on behalf 
of Labor legislation. We must stand by him. 
He is our friend, and will continue to be. 
We should tell the . Governor that James 
Meehan should never have been removed and 
that he should be reappointed to the Divi- 
sion of Unemployment Compensation. 

Delegate Sheldon (Teachers No. 441, 
Boston), speaking on the resolution, 
said: 

I want to say one word. I was at a hear- 
ing on the change of the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Commission. Not being bound at 
that particular moment, I went a little further 
in the argument and said we should have re- 
tained the three-man commission so that Labor 
would be represented on the commission. The 
bargain that was made with the Governor, the 
Governor has disregarded, and has accepted 
a director who cannot be said to represent 
Labor. The bill is one which allows the 
appointment of a man to represent Labor. 
Such appointment is certainly required under 
the spirit of the original law and would seem 
to be required under the terms of our agree- 
ment with the Governor. I feel this resolu- 
tion should be endorsed by everyone here. 
In the present setup Jim Meehan's position 
has been left vacant, but apparently an effort 
is being made to bamboozle us by giving 
the labor relations position to a man, a friend 
of ours, who has a position which needs his 
full time. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Vice-President Doyle presented Leon 
Arkin, representative of the Jewish La- 
bor Committee, and New England man- 
ager of the Jewish Daily Forward, who 
addressed the delegates, as follows: 

Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen — First 
permit me to thank the officers and you dele- 
gates for the kind invitation extended to the 
Jewish Labor Committee to send a represen- 
tative to address this convention, and I am 
grateful to the committee for choosing me as 
its spokesman. 

The Jewish Labor Committee, the organiza- 
tion which I represent here this morning was 
organized upon the advice of William Green, 
President of the A. F. of L. at the San 
Francisco convention. A resolution was 
passed to create a committee which should 
be known as the "Committee for the Libera- 
tion of European Workers" whose purpose 
and aim is to fight fascism and dictatorship 
in any country in which they exist, and under 
any flag. The A. F. of L. recognizes the 
fact that fascism, naziism end dictatorship 
are the worst enemies of Labor. And the 
Jewish Labor Committee was organized as a 
part of the liberation committee to work 
amongst the Jewish laboring masses towards 
that end. 

This is the third time at which I have had 
the pleasure of addressing state federation 
conventions. Since the last time I appeared 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



before you the Labor Movement in a few 
additional countries have suffered a setback. 
The Labor Movement of Austria lias been 
destroyed by the same elements which have 
destroyed the great German Labor Movement 
and its trade unions. The free country of 
Czechoslovakia was robbed of its democracy, 
and with it the Labor Movement went into 
destruction. 

Since the coming of the industrial age 
the Jews have been the barometer for the 
Labor Movement. When a government be- 
gins to persecute the Jews, it eventually 
follows with persecuting the workers. The 
equality and the liberty, or the lack of it, 
as enjoyed by Jews, is likewise true of Labor. 
This is why Organized Labor throughout the 
world, outside of sentimental reasons, is 
against anti-semitism, because it knows that 
the first blast against the Jewish people is 
only the forerunner of a dark storm against 
Labor. 

This is why Organized Labor in every 
country fights against the persecution of the 
Jews. This is why in all countries today 
conscientious and intelligent Jews march with 
Labor, and this is why Labor is a staunch 
defender of Jewish rights. 

With the" native American liberty and 
democracy is such an ordinary and natural 
condition that he no longer feels it, but for 
many millions of other Americans by choice, 
like myself, who were born and brought up 
under tyranny and who tasted its bitter fruit, 
where education was denied to everybody but 
a few, freedom of movement was restricted, 
many of us went to jail at the age when your 
children are going to high school, not be- 
cause of preaching violence or championing 
anarchy, but because we wanted to think and 
educate ourselves. We appreciate what liberty 
and democracy means, due to the fact that 
we went through the tyranny and oppression. 

Today, nearly one-half of the world has 
lost its liberty, its voice, its rights for free 
assemblage, of free press, and the right to 
organize into trade unions. 

In the fascist countries the workers are 
suffering, but the Jewish workers are suffering 
still more. The Jews in those countries 
occupy a conspicuous and painful place. As 
workers they are persecuted for being mili- 
tant; as traders, as being greedy; if they 
produce geniuses, they are charged with dis- 
rupting the world ; if they produce criminals, 
they are charged with corrupting it. When 
we give our lives for liberty, we are charged 
with being internationalists; when we comply 
and obey, we are charged with being cowards. 

One of the most important reasons why 
all tyrants hate us is because of our long 
experience in resisting injustice and cruelty. 
Over 4000 years ago a Jew by the name of 
Moses, himself an intellectual, led a strike 
of bricklayers at the Pyramids, and since 
then all Pharaohs are our enemies, and we 
have been made the scapegoat for every- 
body's failures. Oh, how easy it is to blame 
crimes and failures on a small minority that 
has been marked for centuries for persecu- 
tion. 

A few weeks ago the Planet Mars, was, 
according to astronomers, very close to our 
planet, only 36,000,000 miles away, and a 
great deal of time, effort, energy and money 
has been spent by the civilized world to dis- 
cover if there was any life on that planet. 
But less than 3,600 miles away a shipload 
of 907 Jewish souls have been driven out 
from their native land, sailed from one harbor 
to another, for no other reason than for being 
born a Jew. 

But the Jew is not the only one who 
suffers on account of their religious beliefs 
in the fascist countries. I do not have to 
tell you what happened to a Catholic cardinal 



under the nazi regime, and what the 
Protestant missionaries have to go through. 

To our regret efforts of religious intoler- 
ance have been made in the United States. 
Some are trying to sow the seeds of fascism 
in our country. As I have already told you 
that fascism begins first with the persecution 
of the Jews, and follows by destroying the 
Labor Movement. Some demagogues try 
to create religious intolerance, hatred, and 
undermine the principles of American 
democracy. 

I know that you, ladies and gentlemen, will 
oppose with every fibre in your body and 
soul, and prevent such intolerance from mak- 
ing inroads which would endanger yours 
and my liberty and democracy. 

Therefore, I stand here before you and 
speak to you in tlie name of Jewish Labor, 
that we will not make peace with the tyran- 
nists of the world until democracy will 
prevail, until the labor unions, its powerful 
cooperative movements, its press, its free- 
dom will be reestablished. 

Mr. President and delegates, I want again 
to express my sincere thanks for giving me 
the privilege of being spokesman for the 
Jewish Labor Committee. I am convinced 
that you will continue the policies adopted by 
the A. F. of L. in regard to fascism and 
nazism, and in this spirit I greet you and 
thank you. 

Vice-President Doyle made the follow- 
ing announcement: 

I am going to take this opportunity to 
make an announcement. No doubt many of 
you are acquainted with Charles Reed, who 
was business agent of the Lynn and Salem 
local unions -of the electrical workers, and 
more recently assistant to the International 
President Dan Tracy. Last night a tele- 
gram was received by International Vice- 
President John Regan that Charlie Reed died 
last night in Pittsburgh. This means a loss 
within a few weeks of two of our interna- 
tional representatives from New England. 

Vice-President Doyle then presented 
John Carroll, Chairman of the State 
Housing Board, and delegate from the 
Cement Finishers Union No. 534, Bos- 
ton, who addressed the delegates, as 
follows: 

Mr, Chairman, officers and delegates — The 
development of social consciousness in a 
nation is a slow and difficult process. Each 
step in its progress, while providing a better 
way of life for the underprivileged, is won 
only through unremitting effort on the part 
of those pioneers who have the vision to fore- 
see the ultimate value to society. 

The corollary of progress is an inevitably 
real injury to a few and an imaginary injury 
to a great many. The opposition to social 
progress comes largely from those groups 
who imagine they are to suffer because others 
benefit — those too selfish to share the bless- 
ings which rightfully belong to all and those 
who seek to profit by making of themselves 
a nuisance value. Every new trend in the 
social scale has met with the same obstacles. 

Now that we are engaged in the promo- 
tion of perhaps the most fundamental of all 
human needs — that of decent, safe and sani- 
tary homes for the people — we find the same 
opposition which was present at the intro- 
duction of public education, decent labor 
laws, the protection of the public against 
impure foods, social security and many other 
things which today are accepted without 



52 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



question. Within my own memory, there 
was a petition before the General Court in 
Massachusetts to give the right to our mu- 
nicipalities to adopt ordinances creating one- 
way streets for traffic in the congested areas 
of our city. Even this now generally accepted 
public policy met with violent opposition and 
it took a crusader, the late Police Commis- 
sioner O'Mara, to blaze the way and force 
its adoption. 

What I am trying to say is that it is tough 
to be a crusader. I would like to outline for 
you the major obstacles which stand in the 
way of the housing program today but which 
I believe will be overcome, and then I would 
like to tell you something of what we hope 
to do in the future. 

It is natural that our greatest opposition 
has come from the banking and real estate 
interests and that their main concern has 
been the fear that new housing projects would 
compete with their properties. Under the 
terms of the Massachusetts housing law, for 
every new living unit built a substandard 
unit must be demolished ; thus there can be 
no increase in the number of dwelling units 
in any community. There is a further pro- 
vision that a family in order to be eligible 
as a tenant in a public housing project, must 
be living in a svibstandard home and its total 
income must not exceed five times the rental 
to be paid, except in the case of a family 
with three or more minor dependents when 
the ratio is six to one. Yes, this makes 
competition but only with unfit housing, and 
we welcome this. 

Another source of opposition — and it has 
been effective since it can directly sabotage 
the program — is political. This has been 
evidenced by the action of several local gov- 
ernmental bodies in refusing to appropriate 
sufficient funds for the initial expenses of a 
local Authority. In some cases, even after 
having established an Authority, they have 
made it ineffective by refusing to cooperate, 
for selfish reasons. 

This political opposition is in no sense 
local, only ; it extends to both the state and 
nation. During the past session of the Legis- 
lature the State Board of Housing recom- 
mended to His Excellency, the Governor, 
that its powers be widened to permit it to 
reach out and assist the small communities 
now unable to participate in the federal pro- 
gram. Bear in mind that these small com- 
munities contain very nearly 60 per cent 
of our population. The Governor thought so 
well of the idea that he transmitted it to the 
Legislature in a special message, recom- 
mending its consideration. This proposed 
bill reached the hearing stage but it was 
scuttled in advance since the decision of the 
committee to kill it was announced simul- 
taneously with the close of the hearing and 
laefore the committee had time to properly 
consider the evidence presented. 

In the cities of Boston, Holyoke aiid 
Lowell, the opponents of housing, failing in 
their efforts to stop the progress of the pro- 
posed projects have resorted to the courts 
for a remedy ; a total of five suits have been 
entered. However, I do not fear the results. 
Massachusetts has always led the way in 
progressive social legislation. Twenty-four 
years ago the people of this state approved 
an amendment to the Constitution empower- 
ing the Commonwealth to provide homes for 
its workers and I believe that the people of 
this state are still interested in the welfare 
of their neighbors. 

Now as to the future. While we regret 
the loss of the additional $800,000,000 appro- 
priation, we still have earmarked for this 
state the sum of $50,800,000 which, with the 
10 per cent that the local Housing Authori- 
ties are expected to provide, leaves i:s with 



a gross amount of $56,400,000. This will 
provide work, and plenty of it, for all con- 
cerned with housing for the next two years. 

A year ago, if you had asked me if we 
could rehouse those people now living in 
substandard areas and at the same rentals 
which they are now paying, I would have 
answered, "We hope to." Today I can 
answer, "Yes — definitely." To do this very 
thing has been one of our main objectives 
and it has come about only through good, 
hard work and thinking on the part of those 
people engaged in the promotion of public 
housing. 

Unfortunately, what we can do today 
reaches so few of those families in need of 
better housing that our efforts in the future 
must be devoted to expanding the program 
so that the time will come when all families 
will be able to live in such a way that our 
much boasted "American standard of living" 
will have a real significance. To accomplish 
this, the continued assistance of the federal 
government will be required, at least to the 
extent of providing annual subsidies for the 
purpose of achieving the low-rent character 
of projects to be undertaken. It has been 
my privilege, since I became associated with 
public housing, to advocate the following 
new ideas in the carrying out of a public 
housing program. 

1. The decentralization of the housing pro- 
gram, permitting local participation and 
limiting the federal government's part to the 
furnishing of monies and necessary super- 
vision to protect its loan. 

2. The objective of public housing is to 
eliminate slums and rehouse slum dwellers. 
We have found in our investigations that a 
large percentage of slum dwellers are recipi- 
ents of relief in one form or another. I have 
advocated during the last few years, the 
liberalization of the restrictions which hereto- 
fore existed in tenant selection, to the end 
that relief recipients may be accepted as 
tenants in public housing projects. This 
policy has been adopted. 

8. I am now taking the liberty of advo- 
cating one other reform in the financing of 
public housing. The present policy of the 
federal government in financing public hous- 
ing is to sell bonds to the public the pro- 
ceeds of which are loaned to the local hous- 
ing authorities. Money acquired in this way 
means, in substance, that we have indirect 
private financing for the development of 
public housing, thereby making it appear that 
bond issues by the federal government for 
this purpose become a public debt and 
responsibility, which the facts do not bear 
out. Now my proposal is that local housing 
authorities should be permitted to borrow 
all of the necessary money, instead of just 
10 per cent, directly from private sources for 
the development of their projects. _ This 
would obviate existing indirect borrowing. 

As soon as our banking executives awaken 
from their slumbers and analyze the possi- 
bilities and appreciate the soundness of this 
suggestion, there will be very little difficulty 
in having this idea become a reality. I in- 
tend to dedicate at least part of my time 
and efforts to this end. 

I want to take this opportunity in closing 
to thank the State Federation of Labor for 
the assistance they have given me at all 
times. I never had the occasion to say 
that the State Federation of Labor was ever 
found wanting when I called upon them for 
assistance. I thank you. 

Vice-President Doyle then introduced 
Edna L. Spencer, Chairman of the Massa- 
setts Committee for the Repeal of Plan 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



53 



E and Proportional Representation, who 
spoke, as follows: 

Mr. Chairman and members of the conven- 
tion — I thank you for this opportunity to 
speak to you briefly on the important matter 
of the repeal of Plan E and Proportional 
Representation. As long as these two acts 
remain on our statute books they will con- 
tinually be dangerous, because while Plan E 
appears to be merely another harmless act, it 
is in reality a cleverly-devised plan to permit 
local radical and minority groups to gain a 
foothold in our city and town governments. 
Plan E and Proportional Representation are 
a step toward totalitarianism and away from 
democracy. It substitutes minority control 
for majority control. In speaking here I 
know I am talking to a group of staunch 
Americans who stand for justice and for a 
high standard of morals, for loyalty to our 
American and democratic form of govern- 
ment. And so I trust and believe that you 
will cooperate individually and collectively 
with those who are working for the repeal of 
Plan E and Proportional Representation. It 
was largely because of the cooperation of the 
Cambridge Central Labor Union that we were 
able to defeat that. It means lower wages. It 
is not carried to only cities and towns but 
there is also a strong effort on foot to extend 
this to our state and national governments. 
So knowing that you have worked for the 
betterment of humanity, I feel certain you 
will attempt to protect our city, state and 
nation from such acts as Plan E and Pro- 
portional Representation. I thank you. 

Delegate Pearlstein, Chairman of the 
Committee on Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent's Report, rendered the 
following report for the committee: 

Your committee desires to sound this note 
of warning: It is true that we as workers 
have made measurable progress in the secur- 
ing of legislation favorable to us, but — we can- 
not and must not be lulled into a false sense 
of security and rest on our hard-won vic- 
tories. The immutable law of reaction can- 
not be evaded. Recent events at our state 
and national capitals compel the conclu- 
sion that the forces of reaction in no uncer- 
tain way are doing all in their power to de- 
stroy, emasculate or nullify every piece of 
social legislation that has been secured by 
the workers, and through an aroused public 
conscience. 

Bills favored by Labor and enacted into 
law : Elimination of employee contribution to 
Unemployment Compensation Fund, House 
2441 ; amendment to Labor Relations Act, 
House 820; burial allowance for fatally in- 
jured workmen. Senate 319; broadening the 
scope of the forty-eight hour law for women 
and minors. House 2450; changing the hours 
of beginning employment from five to six 
o'clock in the morning. House 1079; extend- 
ing the lunch hour provision to additional 
women and minors. House 1078; extending the 
regulation of employment of minors, House 
2353 ; prohibition of split trick employment 
for minors under sixteen. Senate 532 ; reducing 
hours of employment for certain minors. 
House 1080; commission on apprenticeship 
framing, House 738. 

Your committee notes that even these few 
favorable bills were grudgingly obtained from 
the present reactionary House and Senate. 

Bills opposed by Labor and defeated: Com- 
pulsory mediation of labor disputes, House 
1926, a particularly vicious bill ; and a bill 



to prohibit the sale of litiuor on Sunday, 
Senate 233. 

Bills still pending in Legislature: "With 
the General Court still in session at the time 
of our printer's deadline, much of the Fed- 
eration's important legislative fietitions are 
awaiting final consideration. Some matters 
are before either the Senate or the House 
of Representatives, but most of the impor- 
tant bills are in the possession of the House 
Committee on Ways and Means." Certainly a 
most unusual situation. 

Bills favored by Labor and defeated: State 
fund for workmen's compensation, House 
1863; Child Labor Amendment, House 315; 
regulation of private employment offices, 
House 2224; election of judges. House 1035; 
bill to repeal teachers' oath law. House 258 ; 
burial allowance for fatally injured workmen. 
House 1644 ; Labor representation on public 
utilities commission, House 767 ; supervision 
of linemen, cable splicers, metermen, et cetera. 
House 681 ; wage adjustment for employees of 
state institutions. House 991 ; benefits of 
"Baby Wagner Act" for state employees. 
House 1129; abolition of split shifts in state 
institutions. House 1272; additional man on 
semi-trailer truck units. House 1327; sick 
leave for employees of state institutions. 
House 2443 ; appointment of persons with 
occupational experience to Motor Truck Divi- 
sion, Department of Public Utilities, House 
1411 ; weekly pension for state and munici- 
pal employees. Senate 166 ; licensing of auto- 
mobile mechanics. House 1710; elimination of 
liability of mortgagors of real estate, House 
1017; licensing of operators of refrigerating 
apparatus and internal combustion engines, 
Senate 186 ; regulating the hours of barber 
shops. House 1268; appointment of qualified 
members to Board of Registration of Barbers, 
House 1266 ; bill to regulate the installation 
of fuel oil burners. House 2082 ; licensing of 
cooks and regulation of commercial cook- 
ery. House 2320 ; water-tight bulkheads and 
lifeboats on fishing boats. House 1682; fabri- 
cation of freestone or limestone used by the 
Commonwealth by residents of the Common- 
wealth, Senate 271 ; Saturday half holiday 
for drawbridge employees. House 482. 

Your committee recommends that these or 
like bills be introduced at the next session 
of the Legislature. 

"With the House of Representatives and 
the Senate more predominantly Republican 
than it has been in several years, and with a 
Republican Governor," whose lip services and 
promises, together with his past and reac- 
tionary record on Labor legislation, small 
hope can be entertained that the workers of 
our state will receive the "square deal" that 
we were told about recently. 

All the laws protecting Labor are meaning- 
less, and of no avail if in the hands of a 
reactionary judiciary. No greater menace to 
liberty confronts the working men and women 
of our Commonwealth than "judge-made 
law," as applied through the injunctive writ 
in industrial disputes, where seemingly prop- 
erty rights are put above human rights. 

The recent action of our state judiciary 
(one of the most reactionary in the United 
States) in making invalid the anti-injunction 
law passed by the Legislature in 1935. is 
but an example of what we can expect. We 
urge the delegates to carefully read the re- 
port on pages 73-75, and 75 in particular, and 
to familiarize themselves with the seriousness 
of the situation that confronts us. 

Our finances are on a sound basis as the 
financial report shows. Our numerical 
strength is at its highest peak since the 
founding of the State Branch over 50 years 
ago. Eighty-four new affiliations last year 



54 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



are a welcome addition to our growing 
family. 

To Miss Agnes T. Kane, our office secre- 
tary, goes the thanks of this convention and of 
every member whose business has brought 
him to the office, for the courteous, efficient and 
intelligent way in which she has conducted 
the duties of her office, and thanks of this 
convention also goes to Miss Esther F. 
Cahill for her assistance and helpfulness dur- 
ing the course of the year. 

Only those who understand the enormous 
difficulties of obtaining favorable legislation 
for the workers from the present reactionary 
Legislature, can truly appreciate the full worth 
of the labor-driving energy and patience of 
Kenneth Taylor, our able Legislative Agent, 
and we wish to express to him our thanks 
and appreciation for his untiring efforts in 
our behalf. 



Secretary Taylor spoke on the com- 
mittee's report, as follows: 

For four years I have served in the State 
House, two of which I served as Assistant- 
Secretary and two as Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent. Reports have been sub- 
mitted to the delegates relative to one of the 
most important functions of the Massachu- 
setts State Federation of Labor. In the re- 
port a very careful outline is given of the 
legislative matters adopted, those that are 
defeated and others in which Labor is inter- 
ested. 

I felt determined to say a word this year, 
rather than to just permit my report to be, 
shall I assume, unanimously adopted by the 
convention. Upon taking over the office of 
Secretary-Treasurer, I departed from the cus- 
tomary procedure and I set up in the office 
a legislative mailing list and sent question- 
naires to every affiliated union in this state, 
asking them for the name of a member of 
each particular union who would interest 
himself sufficiently in legislation to cooper- 
ate with the Executive Council and the Legis- 
lative Agent of the State Branch. 

I sincerely hope that the delegates in at- 
tendance at this convention will go back to 
their respective organizations and stress to 
their officers and members the important fact 
of how necessary it is to comply with the 
reasonable requests that are made from time 
to time at our headquarters with respect to 
contacting Senators and Representatives in 
favor of or against certain legislation that we 
are interested in. I know from my experience 
on Beacon Hill that lawmakers are impressed 
by the amount of mail they receive. Can you 
imagine what would occur and what the 
ultimate outcome of the many bills we pre- 
sent would be if every member of the Massa- 
chusetts Trade Union Movement sent a one- 
cent postcard? I realize that every union 
cannot send a representative to a legislative 
hearing. That entails expense and lost time. 
But when a letter goes out it would seem to 
me that the many members who receive them 
should consider it as important, and encour- 
age as many members as possible to contact 
their Senators and Representatives. 

Those of us who lobby on Beacon Hill are 
registered as such, and while most lawmakers 
are on a personal basis friendly, there are 
some who, when they have to choose between 
the "interests" and us, are inclined to duck, 
feeling that Taylor may be too busy to mark 
it down — but if he gets mail fiom his par- 
ticular district you have served notice that 
there is a great deal of interest in Labor mat- 
ters on Beacon Hill. 



I wish the delegates would go back home 
pledging themselves to cooperate to the full- 
est extent in the future, and I assure you if 
that is forthcoming we will have more legis- 
lation enacted than ever before. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, continued his 
report: 

RESOLUTION NO. 36 
BOSTON PARKING REGULATIONS 

Whereas, The parking regulations in the city 
of Boston are strict, and are being enforced to 
the letter, and 

Whereas, It is next to impossible for the 
drivers of trucks to find parkmg space at the 
curb line, and 

Whereas, In many places there is ample room 
for the drivers of trucks to double park with- 
out hindering the flow of traffic; therefore, be it 
Resolved, That the Executive Council of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor be 
instructed to conXer with Police Commissioner 
Timilty, and arrange for more lenient parking 
regulations for trucks. 

NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Drivers 

No. 168, Boston 
CHARLES A. BURNS, Teamsters No. 

379, Boston 
OSWALD F. CROCKFORD, Teamsters 

No. 526, Fall River 
WILLIAM A. NEALEY, Teamsters No. 

42, Lynn 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 

379, Boston 

JOHN J. DUFFY, Teamsters No. 68, 

Boston 
MARTIN MORAN, Teamsters No. 68, 

Boston 
CHARLES La PLACA, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 
ANDREW D'AMBROSIA, Teamsters No. 

25, Boston 
EVA VARNET, Teamsters No. 829, 

Somerville 
GEORGE STACK, Teamsters No. 829, 

Somerville 
THEODORE La PLACA, Teamsters No. 

496, Boston 
RAYMOND McCALL, Teamsters No. 494, 

Boston 
ALBERT W. FUCHS, Teamsters No. 

646, Boston 
ABRAHAM PEARLSTEIN, Teamsters 

No. 259, Boston 
MATTHEW A. DUNN, Teamsters No. 

380, Boston 

MATTHEW J. MALONEY, Teamsters 

No. 380, Boston 
E. A. RALEIGH, Street Carmen No. 448, 

Springfield 
MICHAEL L. WEBB, Teamsters No. 

494, Boston 
P. H. JENNINGS, Teamsters No. 168, 

Boston 
DAVID F. LOONEY, Firemen and Oilers 

No. 3, Boston 
LEONARD A. RYAN, Teamsters No. 

170, Worcester 
WARREN F. DELESKEY, Teamsters 

No. 995, Boston 
RUSSELL E. McMAKIN, Chemical 

Workers No. 21989, Cambridge 
VINCENT S. BAGDONAS, Retail Clerks 

No. 372, Lowell 
FRANK J. HALLORAN, Teamsters No. 

25, Boston 
MICHAEL T. O'DONNELL, Teamsters 

No. 25, Boston 
WALTER CENERAZZO, Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



55 



NATHAN SIDD, United Garment Work- 
ers No. 1, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DE ANDRADE, Paper 

Handlers, Plate Boys and Press 

Clerks No. 21, Boston 
JOHN J. CONROY, Meat Cutters No. 

692, Boston 
JOHN J. McNAMARA, Firemen No. 3, 

Boston 
ROBERT W. TAYLOR, Teamsters No. 

25. Boston 
FRANK TIGHE, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 



13, Boston) spoke on the matter, as fol- 
lows: 

I want to say a few words, Mr. President. 
This resolution is in cooperation with the 
one already passed. H is with regret that I 
stand here to support the resolution. For 35 
years I have been a patron of the Lpopold 
Morse Company. One of my life-long friends, 
one of the clerks. Bill Larkin, is employed 
there. And, as I say, it is with deep regret 
that I must stop going to Leopold Morse any 
more. 



The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) spoke on the resolution 
and said that it was a matter that had 
to do with the livelihood of all drivers. 
He stated that many people parked their 
cars and when a delivery was made and 
a driver had to park double for a few 
moments he was reprimanded or received 
a parking tag, and therefore he felt this 
matter should be seriously considered. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Sidd, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Union Labels, Buttons and 
Shop Cards, rendered the following 
partial report, for the committee: 

RESOLUTION NO. 15 

LEOPOLD MORSE COMPANY UNFAIR 
TO ORGANIZED LABOR 

Whereas, The Leopold Morse Company of 
Boston, with stores in other cities, have for a 
great many years received the support and 
patronage of Organized Labor, and 

Whereas, For the gast thirty-five years or 
more the Leopold Morse Company have used 
the label of the United Garment Workers of 
America, affiliated with the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, and 

Whereas, On or about January 1, 1939, the 
Leopold Morse Company severed all relations 
with the United Garment Workers of America, 
and have associated themselves with an or- 
ganization affiliated with the C.I.O., absolutely 
ignoring the American Federation of Labor; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention go on record 
as condemning the Leopold Morse Company 
for its antagonism towards the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Leopold Morse Company 
be placed on the "We don't patronize" list of 
the State Federation of Labor. 

NATHAN SIDD, United Garment 
Workers No. 1, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence, and that it be coupled with the 
resolution previously adopted by the 
convention. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 



Delegate Everitt (Building Service 
Employees No. 30, Boston) spoke, as fol- 
lows: 

Ours is probably the only American Fed- 
eration of Labor organization in the Leopold 
Morse firm. We represent approximately 15 
people, and at this time I concur in the re- 
port and we will be glad to go on record 
under the circumstances here stated. 

Delegate Morris (Hatters No. 65, 
Boston) spoke on Resolution No. 15, as 
follows: 

I am of the opinion that this company cari- 
not be given too much publicity, because if 
the Leopold Morse Company gets away with 
this there will be others who will follow. This 
concern for many years has had a fairly good 
share of the patronage of members of Or- 
ganized Labor. Personally I have purchased 
clothes there for the last 37 years and as I 
bought the last suit, I informed Mr. Ross, 
the manager, that it would be the last until 
they return to the LTnited Garment Workers. 
I went to Mr. Ross with a committee from 
the Boston Central Labor Union and tried 
to organize the clerks and had a long confer- 
ence with him. I also know some of the 
salesmen, and under no consideration did they 
consider joining an organization affiliated with 
the American Federation of Labor. 

The Leopold Morse Company has com- 
plained from time to time that they did not 
get a fair share of our patronage, but we know- 
differently and it is up to us to see that 
they get less. I also want to call to your 
attention that they have two stores here 
and that they have the Nickerson Store in 
Haverhill and another one in Framingham, 
and one in Manchester, New Hampshire. 
They also have stores in Connecticut. It is 
up to us to do all we possibly can to show 
this company that they will not get the 
patronage of Organized Labor in the future 
that they had enjoyed in the past. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Sidd, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Union Labels, Buttons and 
Shop Cards, continued: 

RESOLUTION NO. 17 

CONVENTION HEADQUARTERS MUST 
BE THOROUGHLY UNION 

Whereas, At every convention of the Mas- 
sachusetts State Federation of Labor various 
resolutions calling for the advancement of 
the union label and patronage of union labor 
are invariably ofiered for consideration and 
generally are given the endorsement of the 
convention, and 

Whereas, In general the letter of these 
resolutions is rarely adhered to when we, 



56 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



the delegates to the annual convention con- 
vene, inasmuch as the hotel headquarters as 
a rule is serviced by workers who are not 
members of the Hotel and Restaurant Work- 
ers International Alliance or any of its af- 
filiate local unions, and 

Whereas, In some cases one part of the 
hotel may be organized and other crafts 
therein employed are not represented or or- 
ganized resulting in the conspicuous absence 
of the official Union House Card of the Hotel 
and Restaurant Employees' International Al- 
liance and Bartenders International League 
of America because of the fact that it may 
be issued to hotels and restaurants only if 
all crafts are organized, and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor should lead the way in patro- 
nizing one hundred per cent union hotels 
as an inspiration to other organized groups 
and the public at large ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
go on record as unanimously in favor of 
hiring only hotels which display the Union 
House Card of the Hotel and Restaurant 
Employees' International Union for future 
conventions of the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor, and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution, if adopted, 
be strictly adhered to, so that the delegates 
to the 55th annual state convention may be 
served by union bartenders, cooks, waiters, 
waitresses, and miscellaneous union workers, 
all displaying a working button and working 
under the above-mentioned Union House Card 
which is indicative of a one hundred per 
cent union establishment. 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters 

No. m, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers 

No. 686, Lawrence 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 

Cooks No. 186, Boston 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 

477, Lawrence 
JOHN A. FUSCO, Building Laborers 

No. 175, Lawrence 
JOHN V. JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 

119, Lawrence 
JAMES H. SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 

90, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen 
No. 261, Lawrence 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Everitt (Building Service 
Employees No. 30, Boston) desired to 
know why the sponsors of the resolution 
had only specified hotel and restaurant 
employees when there were many other 
organizations involved and stated that 
if they included all trades, he would be 
in favor of the resolution. 

Delegate Loughran (Building Service 
Employees No. 175, Boston) agreed with 
Delegate Everitt and told of the hard- 
ships his union had encountered and 
stated that if other crafts such as bar- 



bers, musicians, laundry workers and 
others interested in progressive or- 
ganization under the banner of the 
American Federation of Labor are in- 
cluded, he would favor the resolution, 
but he did not feel the State Federation 
should endorse only one international 
union. He said he was disappointed for 
not being allowed to appear before the 
committee. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) stated 
that the resolution was similar to one 
presented to the delegates urging that 
they patronize union hotels. He said 
that the house card covered waiters, 
bartenders, waitresses, cooks and pastry 
cooks and miscellaneous workers. 

Secretary Taylor stated that the State 
Federation of Labor had always followed 
the policy of contacting the central 
body acting as host before a convention 
was held and felt that the local central 
labor bodies were better able to advise 
whether such hotels were union. He 
assured the delegates that no member of 
the Executive Council desired to select a 
hotel as headquarters that was unfair to 
unions affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Stefani (Cooks and Pastry 
Cooks No. 186, Boston) advised that he 
had signed the resolution believing it 
was to include every organization in- 
volved. He said that his intentions were 
clear, honest and sincere, and if the 
resolution did not include all organiza- 
tions, he would like to have all included. 
He further stated that there was no in- 
tention on the part of any of the spon- 
sors to omit any organization. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) moved that Resolution 
No. 17 be referred to the Executive 
Council. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Sidd continuing his report: 

RESOLUTION NO. 29 
UNION LABEL OF UNITED HATTERS 

Whereas, During the present organizing 
campaign many unions have been formed 
among the large industries in this state, and 

Whereas, Thousands of these recently or- 
ganized are engaged in distributing the prod- 
ucts direct to the consumer, and 

Whereas, Many of the ones delivering the 
products are wearing a uniform cap; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the delegates, urge all 
wearers of uniform caps to wear such caps 
as bear the union label of the United Hatters, 
Cap and Millinery Workers Union. The 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



57 



Union label is under the leather of all union 
made uniform caps. 

CHARLES MORRIS, United Hatters, 

Cap and Millinery Workers No. 6,0, 

Boston 

The committee rec<5mmended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Morris (Hatters No. 65, Bos- 
ton) stated that the Hatters label had 
always been used, and he told of the 
runaway shops which had settled in 
Milford, Amherst, Fitchburg and Hol- 
yoke. He stated that his organization 
had been successful in organizing some 
of them and that some had to be brought 
before the Wages and Hours Division 
and fined for non-compliance with the 
law. He urged the delegates to look for 
the union label when purchasing hats. 

Delegate Leonard (Street Carmen No. 
261, Lawrence) stated he and his mem- 
bers had much difficulty purchasing 
products bearing the United Garment 
Workers label and that the label was 
used by non-union concerns which were 
not entitled to it. 

Delegate Sidd (United Garment Work- 
ers No. 1, Boston) stated that unfor- 
tunately some concerns that were not 
entitled to the label had obtained it by 
fraudulent means. He advised that the 
Batchelder firm had a 100 per cent plant. 

The motion was then adopted. 

The convention then adjourned until 
2:00 p. m. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Thursday afternoon at 2:00 by President 
Morrissey. 

Delegate Sidd continued his report for 
the Committee on Union Labels, Shop 
Cards and Buttons: 

RESOLUTION NO. 30 
UNION LABEL OF UNITED HATTERS 

Whereas, The merger of the several unions 
in the headwear industry has resulted in the 
formation of one union in this industry, 
namely United Hatters, Cap and Millinery 
Workers Union, and 

_ Whereas, The union label is your protec- 
tion against inferior, foreign and non-union 
hats and caps, and 

Whereas, It guarantees that the cap was 
made in America by union labor ; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, When buying a hat or cap we 
pledge ourselves to buy only such hats and 
caps that bear the union label of the United 
Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers Union. 



It is sewed under the leather of union made 
luits and caps. Look for it. 

CHARLES MORRIS, United Hatters. 

Cap and Millinery Workers No. 65, 

Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 3.') 

WOODEN BEER BARRELS MADE BY 

MEMBERS OF COOPERS UNION 

Whereas, There are a number of breweries 
using steel containers that do not bear the stamp 
of any organization connected with the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, The wooden barrel is manufactured 
by members of the Coopers International Union 
and bears the official stamp of that organiza- 
tion, which is affiliated with the American Fed- 
eration of Labor; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the fifty-fourth convention of 
the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor go 
on record requesting all its members to de- 
mand their beer drawn from a wooden barrel. 
JAMES J. DOYLE, Coopers No. 89, 
Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 55 
ENDORSEMENT OF CAMPAIGN 
AGAINST R. R. DONNELLY COM- 
PANY OF CHICAGO 

Whereas, The Chicago Allied Printing Trades 
Council is engaged in a vigorous campaign 
against the R. R. Donnelly Company, printers 
of Life, Time and other magazines with na- 
tion-wide circulation, and 

Whereas, The R. R. Donnelly Company of 
Chicago has for many years been regarded by 
the Chicago Allied Printing Trades Unions as 
notoriously unfair, and 

Whereas, All possible efforts have been made 
to unionize the printing plant of that company 
without success; therefore, be it 

Resolved That this convention of the Mas- 
sachusetts State Federation of Labor endorses 
the campaign carried on by the Chicago Allied 
Printing Trades Council and that our members 
be requested not to purchase the above-named 
and other publications printed by the R. R. 
Donnelly Company, until such time as these 
are printed under union conditions. 

GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
GEORGE F. DOHERTY. Stereotypers 

No. 2, Boston 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE. Paper 
Handlers. Plate Boys and Press Clerks 
No. 21, Boston 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
WALTER F. McLOUGHlIX. Press 

Assistants No. 18. Boston 
THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo-En- 
gravers No. 3, Boston 



58 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 

Union, Norwood 
J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
FRANK H. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 

No. 16, Boston 
W. G. HARBER, Mailers No. 16, Boston 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 
The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 57 

PURCHASE OF TEXT BOOKS BEARING 

THE ALLIED PRINTING TRADES 

LABEL 

Whereas, The United States has been 
founded upon the principles of religious liberty, 
with freedom of speech and of education for 
all, and 

Whereas, School and text books are used to 
inculcate the history of the world, the progress 
made by the people for centuries, and 

Whereas, There are many publishers of 
school and text books who deny the rights of 
collective bargaining and fail to pay adequate 
wages and grant fair working conditions and 
hours to their employees, and 

Whereas, The printing trades unions have 
improved the standards of their members 
through many sacrifices over a period of years, 
and 

Whereas, These standards are embodied in 
the union label of the Allied Printing Trades 
Council; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this, the fifty-fourth annual 
convention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor call on the school boards and 
purchasers of school and text books to demand 
the Allied Printing Trades Council union label 
on same; and be it further 

Resolved, That a communication be sent to 
all Central Labor Unions, District Councils 
and unions in Massachusetts, requesting their 
co-operation in waiting upon local school com- 
mittees and purchasers of school books to the 
end that the Allied Printing Trades Council 
union label be specified when ordering books. 
W. G. HARBER, Mailers No. 16, Boston 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
GEORGE F. DOHERTY, Stereotypers 

No. 2, Boston 
MARTIN J._ CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 
Handlers, Plate Boys and Press Clerks 
No. 21, Boston 
JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 176, 

Norwood 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
WALTER G. McLOUGHLIN, Press As- 
sistants No. 18, Boston 
THOMAS LYNCH, Paper Rulers No. 13, 

Boston 
THOMAS MADIGAN, Photo-Engravers 

No. 3, Boston 
DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 
Union, Norwood 



J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
FRANK H. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 

No. 16, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 82 

APPRECIATION OF UNION - MADE 

PRODUCTS DONATED 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor at annual conventions in an 
effort to advance the sale of union-made 
goods, shop cards, buttons and services has 
on display various union-made articles and 

Whereas, These union-made articles are 
donated to these conventions and same are 
raffled free to delegates at the close of the 
convention, and 

Whereas, The following individuals or firms 
have so generously -donated their products, 
and made possible a diversified display of 
union goods ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we the delegates to the 
54th annual convention of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor do hereby acknowl- 
edge our appreciation of these donations and 
that we pledge ourselves to return to our 
locals and interest our members in the pur- 
chase of these union-made goods; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions 
he sent to these firms who made possible the 
success of our display of union-made articles: 

Hunt Marquardt Company, Boston, Agents 
of Crosley Radio Company; Pillsbury Flour 
Mills; Elcho Cigar Company; Florsheim Shoe 
Company; Edgar P. Lewis Candy Company; 
New England Overall Company; M. Hoffman 
and Company; Bastian Brothers; Axton To- 
bacco Company; Brown Williamson Company; 
R. J. Sullivan Cigar Company; Adams Hat 
Stores; Cap M(akers Union No. 4; Union Labor 
Life Insurance Company. 

Respectfully submitted^ 

MARTIN J. CASEY, Chairman 
CHARLES MORRIS 
NATHAN SIDD 
DANIEL F. HARRINGTON 
EVA M. RANKIN 

Union Label Committee 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 43 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TEA COM- 
PANY UNFAIR TO ORGANIZED 
LABOR 

Whereas, During the past year certain ac- 
tivities directed towards the organization of 
the retail store employees in the Great At- 
lantic & Pacific Tea Co. has not produced 
the desired result, and 

Whereas, We believe that the public utter- 
ances of this company in the press and by 
other means, even to the extent of making 
agreements with a few American Federation 



Massachusetts State P'edbration of Labor 



69 



of Labor Unions representing about 10% of 
their associated activities, has been promoted 
purposely to deceive the labor movement and 
the public, and 

Whereas, The retail store employees have 
been encouraged in the continuance of a 
so-called independent union which has only 
operated on the basis of low dues and selfish 
individual promotion of paid official positions, 
and 

Whereas, The time has come to put this 
concern and its retail store employees before 
the public in their true non-union light; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor, in convention assembled 
in Boston, Massachusetts, August 7, 1939, 
place this Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. 
on the "We don't patronize" list, and that 
all affiliated central bodies, councils and local 
unions be notified of this action with the 
request that all members of Organized Labor 
and friends refrain from patronizing this com- 
pany's stores until such time as they sign 
agreements with the Meat Cutters and Pro- 
vision Store Employees' Unions of Massa- 
chusetts and display the shop card and union 
buttons of the Meat Cutters & Provision 
Store Employees Unions, American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

JAMES MARTIN, Meat Cutters No. 

593, Boston 
JOHN J. CONROY, Meat Cutters No. 

592, Boston 
ROBERT H. EVERITT, Building Serv- 
ice Employees No. 30, Boston 
PHILIP GUEST, Meat Cutters No. 214, 

Taunton 
LEO BARBER, Central Labor Union, 

Lynn 
WILLIAM A. NEALEY, Teamsters No. 

42, Lynn 
ALBERT W. FUCHS, Teamsters No. 

646, Boston 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen 

No. 261, Lawrence 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
THOMAS MERCADANTE, Federal 

Labor No. 21962, Boston 
CHARLES F. BUCHANAN, Street Car- 
men No. 238, Lynn 
FRANCIS F. MORSE, Bridge Tenders 

No. 12333, Boston 
ROBERT F. MAGUIRE, Central Labor 

Union, Somerville 
THOMAS W. BOWE, Street Carmen 

No. 589, Boston 
HARRY W. JOEL, Central Labor Union, 

Cambridge 
EDWARD J. MILLER, Electrical Work- 
ers No. 104, Boston 
MATTHEW A. DUNN, Milk Wagon 

Drivers No. 380, Boston 
THOMAS J. BURNS, Milk Wagon 

Drivers No. 380, Boston 
MATTHEW J. MALONEY, Milk 

Wagon Drivers No. 380, Boston 
JOHN J. McNAMARA, Firemen and 

Oilers No. 3. Boston 
RICHARD C. O'BRIEN, Meat Cutters 

No. 592, Boston 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Work- 
ers No. 66, Boston 
THOMAS F. BURNS. Bakery Workers 

No. .S48, Cambridge 
JOHN FITZPATRTCK, P.akerv Workers 

No. 348, Cambridge 
JOHN W. LIND, Seafood Workers No. 

1572, New Bedford 
FRANK HALLORAN, Teamsters No. 

25, Boston 



FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
SYLVIO H. LeBLANC, Barbers No. 447, 

New Bedford 
MICHAEL R. GOMES, Engineers No. 

471. New Bedford 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 

477, Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Ubor 

Union, Lawrence 
THOMAS P. BURKE, Central Labor 

Union, Boston 
PATRICK J. McENTEE, Engineers No. 

849. Boston 
RAY DOOLEY, Hat Workers No. 29, 

Fall River 
HORACE CARON, Carpenters No. 1305, 

Fall River 
DANIEL J. McCarthy, plumbers No. 

135, Fall River 
HOWARD H. LITCHFIELD, Central 

Labor Union, Cambridge 
MICHAEL MAHON, Meat Cutters No. 

575, Fall River 
WALTER CENERAZZO, Sea Food 

Workers No. 1572-1, Gloucester 
HAROLD F. HUNT. Moving Picture 

Operators No. 245, Lynn 
WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Teamsters No. 42, 

Lynn 
LESTER D. HENNESSEY, Teamsters 

No. 42, Lynn 
SIDNEY E. LeBOW, Central Labor 

Union, Lowell 
FRANK MOTTA, Central Labor Union, 

Brockton 
J. H. GRIFFITH, Central Labor Union, 

Lowell 
SIDNEY C. BARTON, Moving Picture 

Operators No. 546, Lowell 
EDWARD C. ENO, Electrical Workers 

No. B1015. Lowell 
EDWARD J. HALEY, Meat Cutters No. 

592, Boston 
RICHARD GROSSE, Meat Cutters No. 

592, Boston 
MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 

Boston 
WILLIAM KELLY, Meat Cutters No. 

592, Boston 
GEORGE F. CALLAHAN, Meat Cutters 

No. 71, Lynn 
JOHN KEMP, Meat Cutters No. 71, 

I-ynn 
JOHN J. DRISCOLL. Meat Cutters No. 

71, Lvnn 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 

Handlers, Plate Bovs and Press 

Clerks No. 21, Boston 
M. J. HINES, Bottlers and Drivers No. 

122, Boston 

The committee recommended that the 
unions involved join together in an ef- 
fort to settle matters in accordance with 
Resolution No. 43. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) moved that Resolution 
No. 43 be referred to representatives of 
unions employed under agreement by the 
Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Com- 
pany and officers of the State Federation 
of Labor, in an effort to secure an ad- 
justment that would permit the or- 
ganization of the trades involved in 
Resolution No. 43. 



60 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Delegate Hamlin (Meat Cutters No. 
618, Boston) stated that he would agree 
with the motion if there was an assur- 
ance that the unions under agreement 
would assist. He said that if all 
worked together they could organize 
employees of the Great Atlantic and 
Pacific Tea Company 100 per cent. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) said that he felt the 
resolution was similar to the hotel reso- 
lution acted upon during the morning 
session and involved the matter of juris- 
diction. He stated that the A. & P. 
used union building tradesmen but 
their maintenance men were non-union 
and that with the assistance of the 
teamsters they were successful in get- 
ting an agreement and putting all the 
men into the union. Delegate Johnson 
further stated that if the resolution was 
adopted, it would jeopardize those now 
under agreement, and felt that if the 
motion was adopted, they would be suc- 
cessful in their efforts to organize all 
A. & P. employees. 

Delegate Driscoll (Meat Cutters No. 
71, Lynn) stated that his organization 
had been trying to organize these em- 
ployees for more than a year. He said 
that in sections such as Lynn, Glouces- 
ter and Salem central bodies had worked 
100 per cent with his organization. Since 
the convention at Worcester, he said, 
the building tradesmen, bakers and truck 
drivers were successful and with no 
criticism of them, he was simply asking 
for the cooperation to which he felt his 
organization was entitled. He further 
said that if unions with agreements 
didn't take an interest in the unorgan- 
ized trades, the American Federation of 
Labor would have taken a step back- 
ward. He said that a meeting should 
be held immediately as suggested to see 
what conclusion could be reached and 
that whatever the convention decided 
upon would be respected by him. 

Delegate Sullivan (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) said that he thought the team- 
sters were more familiar with the work- 
ings of the A. & P. than any other or- 
ganization and advised that the first 
place an agreement was signed with the 
A. & P. was in Boston. He stated that 
he appeared several times before the 
company union in Cambridge and told 
them they would be in his organization 
within six months, which they are. 
Teamsters were called upon time and 
time again for assistance, he said, but 
as soon as organizations were success- 



ful, they had no further desire to go 
along with the teamsters. Delegate Sul- 
livan stated that his organization was 
frequently in court for calling their 
members out of plants where they have 
signed agreements to assist other 
unions, but the expense was always 
borne by his union. He said that his 
union had about 700 members in the 
A. & P., all organized within the last 
year and also during that time the in- 
side workers and building tradesmen 
had been organized. He felt that the 
various unions should sit down and 
devise a way to carry on a successful 
organization campaign. 

Delegate O'Donnell (Teamsters No. 25, 
Boston) emphasized the financial re- 
sponsibility placed upon the teamsters 
union by fighting for other organiza- 
tions and told of the many court cases 
and the large amount of money ex- 
pended. He stated that his union had 
often times refused to service firms 
which were being organized only to 
learn that the same people were using 
the American Express Company. He felt 
that members of his union were being 
placed in jeopardy too often because of 
existing signed working agreements and 
hoped the resolution would not be 
adopted. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) felt 
that it was foolish to place such a big 
concern on the unfair list and that with 
so many plants throughout the entire 
country, it would not create a dent in 
their business as they had 16,000 stores. 
He stated that the convention should 
not take any action that would decrease 
the 10 per cent who were organized, but 
should go out and increase that per- 
centage and there was every reason to 
believe it could be accomplished. 

Delegate Jennings (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) advised that he had 
been trying to organize the A. & P. for 
15 years and at last the firm was nego- 
tiating with the American Federation of 
Labor. He felt that the motion made 
by Delegate Johnson should be adopted. 

Delegate Guest (Meat Cutters No. 214, 
Taunton) stated that many people go 
into stores and inquire whether the 
salesmen are union but do not look for 
the button and that they were not ask- 
ing anyone to organize for them, but 
simply that members of the Trade Union 
Movement refrain from patronizing 
those stores until they were organized. 



Massachusetts Statk Feukfution ok Lamor 



r,i 



He stated that his organization would 
go along with any committee, but would 
ask that the delegates as individuals 
and trade unionists to stop patronizing 
A. & P. stores until the matter was 
straightened out. 

Delegate Fitzpatrick (Teamsters No. 
170, Worcester) told of a situation in 
Worcester last year where he was called 
in on a strike involving meat cutters 
and that his members remained out for 
two weeks only to learn that the 
butchers union had no members in the 
store. He stated that the incident cost 
his union $2,000 and that the teamsters 
unions should no longer be expected to 
"hold the bag." 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) stated that 
when his organization was trying to or- 
ganize the A. & P., Organizer Jennings 
went out of his way to assist them and 
they were successful in obtaining a 
closed shop. He felt the same results 
will be accomplished if the same thing 
was done in this case. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Sidd, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Union Labels, Buttons and 
Shop Cards, continued: 

RESOLUTION NO. 54 

SUPPORT OF ALLIED PRINTING 
TRADES LABEL 

Whereas, The Allied Printing Trades Coun- 
cil union label is the only union label on 
printed matter recognized by the American 
Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, The Allied Printing Trades Coun- 
cil union label g:uarantees that workers en- 
gaged in production of printed matter bear- 
ing^ same are in contractual agreement with 
their employers, and 

Whereas, Workers engaged in these shops 
enjoy fair wages, hours and working condi- 
tions; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this, the 54th annual con- 
vention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor, call upon members and friends 
of Organized Labor to support the union 
label of the Allied Printing Trades Council 
and to insist upon same cin all printed mat- 
ter of those whom they patronize. 

MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 
Handlers, Plate Boys and Press 
Clerks No. 21, Boston 
JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 

176, Norwood 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
WALTER :McL0UGHLIN, Press As- 
sistants No. IS. Boston 
THOMAS LYNCH, Paper Rulers No. 

13, Boston 
DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 

Union, Norwood 
J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 
310, Lowell 



FRANK II. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 
No. 16, Boston 

W. C. HAKBICR, .Mailers No. 16, Boston 

J. ARTHUR M OK I ARTY, Typographi- 
cal No. 13, Boston 

JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 
13, Boston 

CEORGE W. LANSLVr;, Newspaper 
Pressmen No. 3. I'oston 

GEORGE F. DOHERTY, Stcreotypcrs 
No. 2, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 



Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) urged the delegates to watch 
for the allied printing trades label and 
to return to merchants or anyone 
printed material not bearing the union 
label. He felt that would help the 
printing trades. He also spoke of the 
R. R. Donnelly Company of Chicago 
which prints Time and Life magazines, 
as well as the Saturday Evening Post, 
advising that the firm was notoriously 
anti-union and urged delegates and 
friends not to buy those periodicals. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Sidd then presented Presi- 
dent Morrissey with a silver belt buckle, 
on behalf of the Committee on Union 
Labels, Buttons and Shop Cards, with 
the following remarks: 

Yesterday we heard many complimentary re- 
marks about the work and accomplishments of 
our President. I agree heartily with those 
remarks. The Committee on L^nion Labels. 
Buttons and Shop Cards decided that our appre- 
ciation should also be displayed in some ma- 
terial way, and without making a long speech. 
I just want to say that we have a beautiful 
union-made silver belt buckle bearing the em- 
blem of the American Federation of Labor. It 
gives me the greatest pleasure to present it to 
our President. 

President Morrissey responded, as 
follows: 

Thank you, Brother Sidd. This is indeed a 
surprise. I am deeply grateful and apprecia- 
tive. I assure you that the service I have ren- 
dered will be continued and during the coming 
year, with the aid of the affiliated locals, we 
shall m.nke our organization even bigger and bet- 
ter. Thank you again very sincerely. 

Delegate Velleman, Chairman of the 
Committee on Officers' Reports; rendered 
the following report for the committee: 

Your Committee on Officers" Reports organized 
with Delegate Vellemen as chairman and Dele- 
gate Johnson as secretary. The committee begs 
leave to make the following report : 

We have carefully examined the officers' 
reports and recommend that reference to the 
questions reported in the printed convention 
report (Pages 52 and 53) pertaining to conven- 
tion cities. That the recommendations of the 
Executive Council therein contained be adopted. 

We have given careful consideration to the 



62 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



problem of the per capita tax and concur in 
the recommendations of the Executive Council 
in amending the Constitution and providing a 
minimum per capita tax charge of $1.00 per 
month. We trust the Committee on Consti- 
tution will report this amendment favorably. 
(Reference to same will be found in commit- 
tee's report on Pages 51 and 53.) 

We call to your attention the legislative bill 
provinding for a Labor Relations Representative 
within the Division of Unemployment Compen- 
sation. The Governor disregarded the valu- 
able service rendered by James P. Meehan and 
failed to reappoint him. Your committee _ feels 
this convention should express keen dissap- 
pointment in not having the services of Brother 
Meehan in the Unemployment Compensation 
Commission and we recommend that every effort 
be made to bring about the appointment of 
James P. Meehan to the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Commission as Labor Relations Repre- 
sentative. 

Your committee desires to express our grati- 
fication in having Francis P. Fenton appointed 
to the position of Director of Organization of 
the American Federation of Labor and we are 
pleased and grateful in the selection of John J. 
Murphy as New England Representative of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

We feel that the convention should acknowl- 
edge the splendid service rendered by Presi- 
dent Morrissey during the past year and the 
spirit of cooperation he has displayed at all 
times in working harmoniously with the officers 
and staff of the Federation which has encour- 
aged them and the general membership of the 
affiliated locals to renew their activities in all 
lines, with particular emphasis in securing new 
affiliations. 

The American Federation of Labor, occupy- 
ing joint office space with the officers and staff 
of the State Federation of Labor, has borne 
fruit and the spirit of cooperation between the 
New England Representative, John J. Murphy, 
the organizers of the American Federation of 
Labor, Kenneth I. Taylor, Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent, Miss Agnes T. Kane and 
Miss Esther F. Cahill, the two young ladies in 
the office, speaks for itself and all are work- 
ing in absolute unison. 

Special reference and mention is made in the 
report of your officers of the valuable services 
rendered by Commissioner of Labor and Indus- 
tries, James T. Moriarty. The new spirit that 
prevails in the Department of Labor, the ac- 
ceptance of many of the workers of the rules 
and regulations governing employment condi- 
tions, wages, etc., we can say without a ques- 
tion of doubt that we are indeed fortunate in 
having James T. Moriarty as Commissioner of 
Labor in Massachusetts. His practical experi- 
ence and_ understanding of the wage earner's 
problern is invaluable. His fairness and im- 
partiality has been proven time and again. His 
presence there has renewed confidence in the 
State Board of Labor and Industry. He has 
earned the respect and confidence of employer 
and worker. We hope and trust his tenure of 
office will be of long duration. 

Your committee has studied the report of all 
of your Vice-Presidents and are satisfied to 
report that they have faithfully fulfilled the 
obligation of their office and that all of them 
have been active in securing new affiliations. 
They have attended legislative meetings, 
have given proper and serious consideration to 
all of the many problems that have from time 
to time come before the Executive Council. We 
commend them for their devotion to the cause 
of Labor and recommend that the convention 
concur in this expression by accepting this 
report unanimously. 



Delegate Velleman moved the report 
of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Kearney, Chairman of the 
Committee on Constitution, rendered the 
following report for the committee: 

RESOLUTION NO. 7 
APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 

Resolved, That the constitution and by- 
laws of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor be amended as follows : "The Presi- 
dent shall appoint all committees, unless 
otherwise chosen by delegates to annual con- 
vention of the State Federation of Labor. 
Delegates appointed or elected as members 
of special committees at annual meetings 
shall be notified by the Secretary-Treasurer 
within ten days subsequent to final adjourn- 
ment of convention, such appointees to ac- 
cept or reject said appointment within three 
days of receipt of notification of said appoint- 
ment. Special convention committees shall 
meet for organization within one month of 
adjournment of annual conventions, and for- 
mulate agenda for carrying out the particu- 
lar business for which they are chosen ; pro- 
vided, that specific matter calls for action 
at once on appointment." 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

The committee recommended non-con- 
currence. 

Delegate Kearney moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Vice-President Fitzpatrick was called 
to the chair. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) said he had submitted the reso- 
lution because many committees have 
been appointed but never functioned. He 
felt that if a committee selected in 1937 
had functioned, we would not have 
biennial sessions of the Legislature. 

The motion was then defeated. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) moved the adoption of Resolu- 
tion No. 7. 

Chairman Kearney explained that the 
resolution simply enlarged the Consti- 
tution with ambiguous language and 
that the appointment and responsibility 
of selecting committees should be left 
in the hands of the President. He said 
that no one appeared before the com- 
mittee in support of the resolution. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) stated that Delegate Kearney's 
argument was misleading and that it did 
not take any rights away from the 
President, but did provide that com- 
mittee appointees would have to either 
accept or decline such appointments. 

The motion was then adopted. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



63 



RESOLUTION NO. 6 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS BY 
REFERENDUM 

Resolved, That a special committee of five 
shall be chosen, two to be named by the 
president, two elected at the annual election 
in 1939, a fifth to be chosen by said four, 
to consider the feasibility and desirability 
of electing by referendum members of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor Ex- 
ecutive Board, and the national Executive 
Council. In event of a favorable report 
said committee is hereby instructed to re- 
port political machinery to bring about selec- 
tion of the governing board of this body 
by popular vote of the rank and file of 
affiliated unions on and after convention of 
1941. 

Delegate to national convention is in- 
structed to introduce legislation for adopting 
same course in electing executive council of 
the American Federation of Labor by refer- 
endum vote of unions chartered by latter 
body and also of unions members thereof 
by affiliation. 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming Ex- 
ecutive CounciL 

Delegate Kearney moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 2 

CHANGE OF TIME OF ANNUAL 

CONVENTION 

Whereas, The holding of the annuaL con- 
vention in the first week of August is incon- 
venient to the delegates and to the Commit- 
tee on Arrangements, due to the torrid 
weather usually prevailing at this time of 
year, known as "dog days," and 

Whereas, The convention is held prior to 
the annual convention of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor and prior to the primaries 
in our commonwealth, which are held in Sep- 
tember, it appears that the best interests 
of the labor movement of Massachusetts 
would be better administered by holding the 
convention after the primaries and after the 
national convention of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, and 

Whereas, In holding the convention after 
the primaries the labor movement of Massa- 
chusetts would be in a more secure position 
politically to render endorsements to friends 
of Labor and to assist in the defeat of 
Labor's enemies ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That Article 3, Section 1, of the 
constitution be amended to read: "The an- 
nual convention of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor shall be held on the 
third Monday of October at the place se- 
lected at the last preceding convention, or 
such place as may be selected by the Execu- 
tive Council." 

JOHN J. KEARNEY, Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Kearney moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Kearney, speaking on the 
resolution, stated that it was unfair to 
the delegates to assemble during the hot 



(log (lays of August, that it was incon- 
venient for the local committee on ar- 
rangements and likewise very incon- 
venient for women delegates who must 
swelter through the hot weather of Au- 
gust. He said the committee believed 
the convention should be held after the 
political primaries, thus preventing fu- 
ture conventions from becoming a foot- 
ball field for candidates who attempt to 
crash the gate. He further stated that 
the committee believed the convention 
should be held after the American 
Federation of Labor convention because 
delegates would then have a better un- 
derstanding of the Federation's program 
for the ensuing year. He said there 
were very few air-conditioned accom- 
modations or any other accommodations 
for the comfort of delegates during the 
month of August. 

Delegate Hamlin (Meat Cutters No. 
618, Boston) stated he could agree with 
the resolution but that it would not give 
the Federation an opportunity to par- 
ticipate in the primaries which might 
result in the selection of two reaction- 
aries with Federation participation dur- 
ing the primaries. He said that at one 
time Labor said politics was none of its 
business but now it had become an es- 
sential function of the movement and 
if politics were left to politicians Labor 
would have nothing to say, which would 
result in the major political parties 
selecting candidates who would be ob- 
noxious to workers. 

Delegate Casey (Electrotypers No. 11, 
Boston) stated that the resolution called 
for the third Monday in October which 
would interfere with national conven- 
tions at which many of our delegates 
would be in attendance and also that it 
would be too close to the American 
Federation of Labor convention. 

Delegate Reynolds (Teachers No. 431, 
Cambridge) moved that the resolution 
be amended by striking out the word 
"third Monday of October" and substi- 
tute therefor the words "second Mon- 
day of September." 

Delegate Reynolds felt the convention 
should be held right after Labor Day 
as it would show the real power of 
Labor during celebrations and then dur- 
ing the convention of the Federation. 
He also felt that the convention should 
be held before the primaries. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenographers 
No. 14965, Boston) hoped there would be 
no change in the Constitution as many 
delegates, particularly those from fed- 



64 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



eral unions, arrange their vacations so 
that they might attend conventions, 
many of whom represent their locals 
without expenses. He stated that con- 
ventions were at one time held during 
September and he believed the present 
time was chosen because of the fact the 
Federation was unable to take part in 
primary elections. He said that no one 
could guarantee the weather in Septem- 
ber or October any more than in Au- 
gust and felt that the Federation should 
continue holding conventions during the 
first week of August. 

Secretary Taylor felt that everyone 
agreed that it was inconvenient to meet 
in the hot weather, but stated there 
must have been some good reason for 
selecting the first Monday of August for 
the opening day of the convention. He 
stated that the resolution should not be 
adopted, but should be more carefully 
studied. He said that it would be al- 
most impossible for our delegate to 
attend the American Federation of Labor 
convention which is held in October and 
he hoped it would be referred to the in- 
coming Executive Council with instruc- 
tions to study the proposal and make a 
report to the next convention with 
recommendations. 

Delegate Caffrey (Central Labor 
Union, Springfield) moved that Resolu- 
tion No. 2 be referred to the incoming 
Executive Council with instructions that 
a report be made to the 55th annual 
convention with recommendations. 

Delegate Perkins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) stated that he was not in- 
terested in the political arguments pre- 
sented, but was interested in the argu- 
ment presented by Delegate Kearney 
that the national convention was held 
before the time suggested in the resolu- 
tion. He felt that since we take instruc- 
tions from the national organization, 
we should meet after that convention. 

Delegate Hines (Bottlers and Drivers 
No. 122, Boston) stated that the reason 
Delegate Velleman had given for the 
change in date was correct, that many 
delegates felt they were being deprived 
of their right to participating in the 
primaries as a Federation and therefore 
set the convention ahead. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) said that the Federation should 
be interested in the primaries, particu- 
larly so because it would offer a chance 
to study the records of the candidates. 
He said he was sorry the committee felt 



the heat was too intense and also agreed 
that many delegates attended the con- 
ventions during their vacations at their 
own expense. 

Delegate Kearney, Chairman of the 
Committee on Constitution, felt that the 
matter was something that could be 
settled in the convention, stating that 
there was no danger in changing the 
date of the convention to October or 
September. He also felt that if the con- 
vention was held after the national con- 
vention a report of that convention 
would be available, whereas the dele- 
gates wait a year now. Delegate Kear- 
ney also stated that the Federation 
should not select candidates before the 
primaries, but should endorse them after 
both parties had selected their candi- 
dates. He advised that the committee op- 
posed referring this matter to the Execu- 
tive Council and hoped the report would 
be accepted. 

After the voice vote was doubted, the 
motion to refer Resolution No. 2 to the 
incoming Executive Council was adopted 
by a standing vote, 109 to 68. 

Delegate Kearney, Chairman of the 
Committee on Constitution, continued: 

RESOLUTION NO. 5 

ENDORSEMENT OF CANDIDATES FOR 

POLITICAL OFFICE 

Resolved, That the constitution and by- 
laws of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor be amended as follows : "The Ex- 
ecutive Council is prohibited from endorsing 
candidates of any party for elective office in 
the state or sub-division thereof, except by 
vote of annual conventions. Endorsement 
is the prerogative of regular conventions of 
the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
or of special conventions called for a specific 
purpose. No action shall be taken other than 
stated in calls for such special meetings." 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

The committee recommended non-con- 
currence. 

Delegate Kearney moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Kearney stated that the com- 
mittee non-concurred in the resolution 
because there is no machinery set up 
now in our constitution relative to en- 
dorsing candidates for political office 
and there is no barometer by which we 
can establish any such kind of a sys- 
tem dua to the constant changes in our 
political alignment and that if the reso- 
lution was adopted, it would require spe- 
cial conventions. He said that the 
committee was of the opinion that the 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



65 



Executive Council should have the right, 
without calling a convention, to endorse 
or condemn any candidate for political 
office, and that the Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent should have the right 
to send letters of recommendation to 
the members of the House and Senate 
who have displayed their friendship to 
Organized Labor. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) stated he had submitted the 
resolution as he believed it to be in 
sympathy and helpful with the work of 
the Federation. He said that it was in 
no way a reflection on the Executive 
Council for endorsing a candidate for 
Governor a year ago and that in his 
opinion it would be for the best in- 
terests of our organization to adopt the 
resolution. 

After the voice vote was doubted, the 
motion to adopt the recommendation of 
the committee was adopted by a stand- 
ing vote, 66 to 61. 

Delegate Kearney, continuing for the 
committee, reported on the Executive 
Council's recommendation relative to 
minimum per capita charge, which reads 
as follows: 

Amend Section I of Article VIII by insert- 
ing after the word "standing" on line six, 
the following: "provided that the minimum 
amount to be paid by local unions shall not be 
less than one dollar per month, so as to read: 

Article VIII — Revenues 

Section 1. The revenues of the State 
Federation shall be derived from local unions, 
which shall pay into the treasury of the Federa- 
tion a per capita of one and one-half cents 
per month for each member in good standing, 
provided that the minimum amount to be paid 
by local unions shall not be less than one dollar 
per month, the same to be payable to the 
Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent of the 
State Federation. He shall deposit in some 
bank, anproved by the Council, all sums in 
excess of fifty dollars, and shall submit to all 
affiliated organizations a full financial report 
quarterly. It is further provided that each 
central body shall pay fifteen dollars per annum 
in quarterly payments. 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Kearney moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor asked the consent of 
the convention to make a motion regard- 
ing the minimum per capita tax matter 
which had just been acted upon. 

Delegate Griffin (Paper Makers No. 12, 
Fitchburg) moved the request of Secre- 
tary Taylor be granted. 



The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor moved that the 
amendment relative to the payment of 
per capita tax take effect as of October 
1, 1939. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Caffrey (Central Labor 
Union, Springfield) asked the consent 
of the convention to make a statement, 
and also a motion. 

Delegate Griffin (Paper Makers, No. 
12, Fitchburg) moved the request be 
granted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Caffrey then spoke, as fol- 
lows: 

We all know that one of the most complex 
problems facing us today is unemployment. We 
also know there has been some talk about an 
army air base in New England for the past 
year. A committee has been appointed to select 
a location. Through the efforts and coopera- 
tion of Labor we have almost convinced the de- 
partment that Chicopee would be an ideal loca- 
tion. Chicopee is one of the cities that has 
suffered because of the mills moving to the 
South and has otherwise suffered considerably 
through the depression like all other cities. 
There is no location in the eastern part of the 
state and we feel that if this convention would 
go on record endorsing that recommendation it 
will not only help Chicopee, but the entire state 
will benefit. Nine million dollars have already 
been appropriated so I feel that if we get your 
support and write to Massachusetts Representa- 
tives and Senators from this state requesting 
that they assist, we will not only help Labor 
but we will also help the city of Chicopee. 

Delegate Caffrey then moved that 
telegrams be sent to Massachusetts 
Representatives and Senators urging 
them to do everything possible to have 
the air base located in the city of Chico- 
pee. 

The motion was adopted. 

Vice-President Caffrey was called to 
the chair. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, continued his 
report for the committee: 

RESOLUTION NO. 53 

COLONIAL PRESS STILL UNFAIR TO 
ORGANIZED LABOR 

Whereas, The conditions that caused some 
400 or more unorganized workers of the 
Colonial Press, Clinton, Massachusetts, to 
leave their employment on March 29, 1937, 
have not been corrected to the satisfaction 
of the printing trades unions involved, and 

Whereas, The unreasonable attitude of the 
Colonial Press has caused the loss of orders 
for many thousands of books, which would 
have meant re-employment for the above-men- 
tioned, as well as many additional workers ; 
therefore, be it 



66 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Resolved, That this, the 54th annual con- 
vention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor, hereby records itself as en- 
dorsing the position taken by the printing 
trades unions having jurisdiction over the 
employees involved, by declaring the Colonial 
Press to be unfair to organized labor, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor pledges _ its continued 
support until these un-American conditions 
are corrected, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor be in- 
structed to notify publishers of books and 
retail stores handling such products of the 
attitude of this unfair establishment. 

W. G. HARBER, Mailers No. 16, Bos- 
ton 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographi- 
cal No. IS, Boston 
JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressman No. 3, Boston 
GEORGE F. DOHERTY, Stereotypers 

No. 2, Boston 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers and Press Clerks No. 
21, Boston 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
THOMAS LYNCH, Paper Rulers No. 

13, Boston 
THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo - En- 
gravers No. 3, Boston 
DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 

Union, Norwood 
J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
FRANK H. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 
No. 16, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be. adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 24 

MIGRATION OF MASSACHUSETTS 

INDUSTRIES 

Whereas, Thousands of workers in Massa- 
chusetts have been left stranded through the 
migration of industry to other states and 
even within the state, and 

Whereas, This migration is artificially stim- 
ulated by the uneconomic and anti-social 
practice of offering inducements, including 
tax exemption, free rent, guarantees of free- 
dom from "labor trouble," cheap power, and 
free factory buildings ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor go on record as urging 
federal legislation to prohibit the offering of 
inducements, directly or indirectly, by any 
public body, and be it further 

Resolved, That a resolution to this effect 

be presented to the annual convention of the 

American Federation of Labor from this body. 

DAVID A. GOGGIN, Plumbers No. 89, 

Springfield 
HARRY P. GRACES, Central Labor 

Union, Boston 
THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 



The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Tilley (Federal Labor Union 
No. 18518, Chicopee) stated it was not 
a question of taxes that caused the mi- 
gration and that a committee had been 
selected in his city to make an investi- 
gation and found industries had been 
paying a very low tax rate but the main 
reason for moving was lower wages else- 
where and not because of high taxes. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 11 

PURCHASE OF MILK AND DAIRY 
PRODUCTS FROM FIRMS EMPLOY- 
ING UNION MEMBERS 

Whereas, In the Greater Boston district, un- 
der the jurisdiction of Milk Wagon Drivers 
and Creamery Workers Union No. 380, an 
affiliate of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and Helpers, 
great strides have been made in organizing the 
drivers of milk and dairy products, and 

Whereas, Many new concerns have been 
added to the list of fair employers in this 
territory, and 

Whereas, It is consistent with trade union 
principles to patronize union labels, shop cards 
and buttons; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates to the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor convention 
pledge their support of union products, and be 
it further 

Resolved, That they_ will urge their families, 
friends and sympathizers to purchase milk, 
cream and other dairy products from one of 
the following concerns, thus keeping union men 
at work and helping build a stronger, larger 
union of milk wagon drivers in the Boston 
jurisdiction: J. F. Cashin, Roxbury, South 
Boston and Dorchester; Martin Cosgrove and 
Son, Dorchester; Deerfoot Farms, Roxbury; 
William B. Driscoll & Co., South Boston, Rox- 
bury and Dorchester; Herlihy Bros., Somer- 
ville, Dorchester, Boston and suburbs; J. E. 
Hilden, South Boston; McAdams, Chelsea, 
Lynn; Seven Oaks Dairy, Somerville; Somerset 
Farms, Boston; Whiting Milk Company of 
Charlestown, Revere, Nantasket, Scituate, 
Quincy, Watertown, Dorchester, Hyde Park, 
Salem and Lynn; United Farmers, Itic, 
Charlestown, Boston and suburbs; Speedwell 
Farms, Watertown, Boston and suburbs; Joseph 
L. Griffin, Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, Dorchester; 
Marland K. Dairy, Inc., Boston and suburbs; 
J. Davidson & Sons, Roxbury, Dorchester and 
Lynn, and United Farmers Ice Cream depart- 
ment. 

MILK WAGON DRIVERS NO. 880, 
Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Dunn (Milk Wagon Drivers 
No. 380, Boston) told of the efforts of 
his union to organize milk concerns and 
of their success, and also of the cam- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



67 



paign they were conducting to have 
members of Organized Labor patronize 
union milk firms. He stated that the 
H. P. Hood, Noble, White Brothers and 
Fairfield Farms were unfair to his union 
and that they had made many attempts 
to organize employees of these firms 
but were unsuccessful. He urged that 
all delegates be sure their dairy prod- 
ucts were delivered by members of the 
Milk Wagon Drivers Union No. 380. He 
thanked the delegates and hoped they 
would continue their generous coopera- 
tion and told of several restaurants 
that had stopped taking union milk — 
restaurants which were patronized by 
union members — and requested their 
support in trying to place union prod- 
ucts in those places again so as to give 
his members work. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Nolan rose to a point of 
personal privilege requesting a roll call 
vote on Resolution No. 5, which had 
been previously acted upon. He stated 
that it had been called to his attention 
that there were delegates standing in 
the rear of the hall and others who 
were not delegates, and felt that the 
resolution was of sufficient importance 
and the previous vote so close to war- 
rant a roll call vote to be sure members 
knew how they had voted. 

Vice-President Caflfrey ruled that the 
delegates were present when the vote 
was announced and did not at that time 
further doubt the vote by requesting a 
roll call and therefore his request was 
unseasonal and out of order. 

Delegate Nolan appealed from the de- 
cision of the chair. 

President Morrissey resumed the 
chair. 

Delegate Nolan, speaking on his 
appeal, said: 

It doesn't seem necessary to go over the situ- 
ation again. President Morrissey informed me 
that according to Roberts Manual unless action 
of this character is taken up at once, it isn't 
in order to bring it up again. I disagree with 
him. I believe, as I have said before, that 
owing to the importance of the question and 
the closeness of the vote we ought to have a 
roll call vote. 

Vice-President Caffrey spoke in de- 
fense of his ruling, as follows: 

The Chair wishes to state in its defense that 
the reason he did not allow the point of per- 
sonal privilege was that if a belated roll call 
vote was allowed on this matter, there would 
be nothing to stop any other delegate from 



asking for a roll call vote on most of thr mat- 
ters disposed of today, yesterday, or the day 
before. T have a great deal of respect for 
Brother Nolan and I know he is a reasonably 
good parliamentarian. P,ut the delegates must 
realize that the question was discussed, dis- 
posed of, and no one doubted the vote. I hope 
you will sustain the decision of the Chair. 

After the voice vote was doubted, the 
decision of the Chair was sustained by 
a standing vote, 119 to 17. 

Vice-President Caffrey was called to 
the chair. 

Delegate Perkins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) moved that action on Reso- 
lution No. 6 be reconsidered. 

The motion was defeated. 

Delegate Russell continued: 

RESOLUTION NO. 44 

REDUCTION OF THE NUMBER OF 

TAXICABS OPERATING IN THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

Whereas, Taxi Cab Drivers No. 496 of 
the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and Helpers of 
America has been organized since 1937. and 
has made rapid strides in the organization 
of the taxicab industry in Boston and vicinity, 
and 

Whereas, Previous attempts to organize 
taxicab drivers in the city of Boston have 
been unsuccessful, due in large measure to 
the law — Acts of 1934, Chapter 280 and 
amendments thereto — which permits fifteen 
hundred and twenty-five (1.525) taxicab"; 
to be licensed within the city of Boston, and 

Whereas, This excessively large number of 
taxicabs has made it impossible for taxicab 
drivers to obtain a minimum wage in keep- 
ing with the American standard of living, 
and has hindered No. 496 in the work of 
the proper organization of the taxicab driv- 
ers ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the police commissioner of 
the city of Boston be respectfully requested, 
by the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor, to exercise his powers in accordance 
with the law — Acts of 1934, Chapter 280 and 
amendments thereto — and reduce the number 
of taxicabs operating on the streets of 
Boston to the minimum of nine hundred 
(900) taxicabs as stated in the law. 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK, Team- 
sters No. 170. Worcester 

LEONARD A. RYAN, Teamsters No. 
170, Worcester 

S. P. JASON, Teamsters No. 59, New 
Bedford 

CHARLES A. ARMSTRONG, Team- 
sters No. 82, Boston 

THEODORE LaPLACA, Teamsters No. 
496, Boston 

P. H. JENNINGS, Laundry Drivers No. 
168, Boston 

NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Driv- 
ers No. 168, Boston 

A. P. NICKERSON, Teamsters No. 653, 
Brockton 

DANIEL J. GOGGIN, Boot and Shoe 
Workers No. 138, Boston 

THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor 
LTnion, Boston 

AUGUSTINE F. WALSH, Bakery Driv- 
ers No. 494, Boston 

RAYMOND T. McCALL, Bakery Driv- 
ers No. 494, Boston 



68 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



JAMES T. SHEA, Bakery Drivers No. 

494, Boston 
DAVID SANDLER, Teamsters No. 831, 

Boston 
WALTER JENSEN, Teamsters No. 494, 

Boston 
FRANK WEBB, Teamsters No. 494, 

Boston 
HARRY GRACES, Central Labor 

Union, Boston 
JOHN J. BUCKLEY, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 78 

TWO MEN ON TRUCKS IN CONGESTED 
AREAS 

Whereas, Difficulty is entailed in the opera- 
tion and delivering and pick-up of general 
freight in congested areas from a motor 
vehicle by the individual operator, and 

Whereas, The safety of the public is in- 
volved in this situation, and 

Whereas, The responsibility is placed upon 
the individual operator, and 

Whereas, The loss of the operator's license, 
and the jeopardizing of his livelihood exists, 
if involved in two backup accidents ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That the safety of the public, 
and the protection of the operator necessi- 
tates a provision for an additional man on 
any motor vehicle in the delivering and 
pick-up of general freight in any congested 
area. 

TEAMSTERS UNION No. 25, Boston. 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Vice-President O'Hare was called to 
the chair. 



RESOLUTION NO. 41 

SUPPORT OF UNION LABOR LIFE 
INSURANCE 

Whereas, The supreme ambition of every 
wage earner today is to provide economic 
independence for himself in his declining 
years and for his loved ones in the event 
of his untimely passing, and 

Whereas, Through the advice and counsel 
and with the assistance of the American 
Federation of Labor and its affiliated na- 
tional and international unions. The Union 
Labor Life Insurance Company was formed, 
and 

Whereas, The Union Labor Life Insur- 
ance Company is not only owned and con- 
trolled by Organized Labor, as represented 
by the American Federation of Labor, but 
is dedicated to the cause of Labor and is 
managed solely in the interests of wage 
earners, their families and dependents, and 

Whereas, The company has demonstrated 
its soundness and validity in serving the in- 
surance needs of wage earners, their families 
and dependents for more than a decade ; 
therefore, be it 



Resolved, That we reaffirm our endorse- 
ment of the Union Labor Life Insurance 
Company and recommend it to all of Or- 
ganized Labor, their friends and sympathiz- 
ers, and be it further 

Resolved, That we recommend to all our 
affiliated and associated local unions through- 
out the state earnest and sympathetic con- 
sideration of trade union group life insur- 
ance, and be it further 

Resolved, That we pledge co-operation to 
the officers of The Union Labor Life Insur- 
ance Company in securing competent repre- 
sentatives and solicitors or agents in the 
various cities and towns coming under their 
respective jurisdictions, and be it further 

Resolved, That we renew our determination 
to have all members of Organized Labor, 
their friends and sympathizers favor The 
Union Labor Life Insurance Company with 
all their life insurance needs, requirements 
and patronage. 

ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers and Press Clerks No. 
21. Boston 
THOMAS LYNCH, Paper Rulers No. 

13, Boston 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 

176, Norwood 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo - En- 
gravers No. 3, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate DeAndrade (Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers and Press Clerks No. 21, 
Boston) moved the resolution be 
amended by adding that the statement 
of facts which was added to the resolu- 
tion be made part of the proceedings of 
the convention. 

Delegate DeAndrade spoke on the 
amendment, as follows: 

My reason for offering the amendment is 
because this company was formed from within 
the American Federation of Labor and its board 
of directors is made up of international officers 
of the American Federation of Labor. It is 
the only company recognized by the A. F. of L. 
and to realize the progress made by this com- 
pany is the reason that I am asking and make 
the motion that the statement of facts which 
was made to the board of directors of the 
Union Labor Life Insurance Company, be in- 
corporated as part of the proceedings of this 
convention so that delegates may carry it back 
to their organizations and show the progress 
being made by the Union Labor Life Insurance 
Company. 

There being no objections, the amend- 
ment was accepted as part of the 
original motion, which was then adopted. 

The statement of facts was read, as 
follows: 

Your committee takes great pleasure in report- 
ing again that the Union Labor Life Insurance 
Company continues its remarkable progress in 
extending protection to the dependents and 
loved ones of organized wage earners, 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



69 



Under the direction of its President, Matthew 
Woll, and the leaders of national and interna- 
tional unions who serve upon its board of direc- 
tors, the company closed the year 1938 with in- 
creased totals of insurance in force, an income 
more than sufficient to meet all obligations 
promptly, thus permitting additional substantial 
investment in high grade securities and mort- 
gage loans, and a favorable mortality and in- 
vestment experience making possible an income 
of voluntary reserve to supplement those re- 
quired by law. In that way the company has 
created a further safeguard, protection and 
guarantee for the fulfillment of the company's 
obligations. 

The Company completed th-e year 1938 with 
$9,442,779 of individual insurance and $59,- 
617,820 of group insurance, or a combined 
total of $69, 060, .599 in force. Compared to the 
corresponding figures at the end of 1937, these 
figures represent an increase of $416,161 in in- 
dividual business, $3,136,070 in group busi- 
ness and $3,552,221 in combined business, 
equivalent to percentage increases of 4.6 per 
cent, 5.6 per cent and 5.4 per cent respectively. 
In comparison with the combined experience of 
American companies for the year 1938, the com- 
pany's figures are much better than the aver- 
age since the combined experience of the 
former indicated only a 1 per cent increase in 
individual insurance, a 2 per cent decrease in 
group insurance leaving them with a net in- 
crease of less than 1 per cent. 

During the year 1938 the company's income 
amounted to $1,223,530, substantially exceeding 
total income for the previous year. In 1938 
the company disbursed $724,000 for death 
claims, disability claims, matured endowments, 
surrender values and dividends to policyholders. 
Net admitted assets increased by $303,609 to the 
sum of $3,075,467 and surplus increased by $35,- 
449 to the sum of $398,153. Contingency re- 
serves were increased by $69,250 to bring their 
total to $316,500. Combined capital, surplus and 
contingency reserves amounted to $1,289,653. 
equivalent to 41.9 per cent of our net admitted 
assets. 

The individual policy department has con- 
tinued to grow. The outstanding position the 
company has attained in the life insurance 
world is acknowledged by the Alfred M. Best 
Company, nationally known life insurance rating 
.service. After an exhaustive study of the 
company's mortality experience, investments, 
management, finances and oneration. Best's sum- 
marized its 1939 report with the following com- 
ment — 

"The Company has been most ably man- 
aged in the interests of its policyholders, 
and the results achieved are well above the 
average for the business. In our opinion 
it has more than ample margins for con- 
tingencies. Upon the foregoing analysis 
of its present position we recommend this 
company." 

Special attention has been paid to the de- 
velopment of individual life insurance business. 
Policy forms and service are offered to protect 
policyholders against premature death or de- 
pendent old age. All popular policy forms such 
as term insurance, whole life, limited payment 
life, endowment insurance, old age endowments, 
modified life, insurance with annuity, inter- 
mediate policy of $500, combination of insur- 
ance and building loan, combination of insur- 
ance and credit union loans, and retirement 
annuity contracts, form a circle of protection 
against the hazards that surround the indi- 
vidual in his journey through life. 

Trade unions are urged to consider the bene- 
fits and advantages of entrusting to the com- 
pany their group life insurance coverage. Group 



insurance has been described as the "most 
democratic form of insurance ", because it 
applies the principle of mutual aid to the 
greatest number at the lowest individual cost. 
When coupled with the principles of mutual aid 
which are inherent in trade unions, group in- 
surance for members of trade unions thoroughly 
represents the most democratic form of volun- 
tary insurance. Costs are low in group insur- 
ance because expenses are held to a minimum. 
In many instances group insurance extends pro- 
tection to persons who carry no other insurance. 
More than half of the claims paid by the com- 
pany under group insurance policies are paid 
to beneficiaries of trade unionists who died 
leaving no other insurance and very little else 
for their dependents. 

Trade unionists and the officers of trade 
unions throughout the state are urged by your 
committee to extend every assistance and co- 
operation to the company in its efforts to 
achieve that place in the life insurance world 
which it so richly deserves. The officers of the 
company are especially anxious to receive the 
names of those men and women throughout the 
state who desire to enter the life insurance field. 
These people will be thoroughly trained by the 
company's agency staff in the principles of 
modern salesmanship, thus placing within their 
reach the revenues of a pleasant and profitable 
occupation. 



RESOLUTION NO. 69 

USE OF RADIO BY EXECUTIVE 
COUNCIL 

Resolved, That the convention reaffirms its 
vote of 1938, directing the Executive Council 
to make increased use of the radio in bring- 
ing to the people of the commonwealth the 
point of view of the Federation and in se- 
curing the full support of the public for 
the program of Organized Labor, and that 
such use of the radio should take the form 
of planned broadcasts, preferably on time ex- 
pressly purchased for the purpose, and ar- 
ranged at regular intervals throughout the 
year. 

JOHN CARROLL, Cement Finishers 

No. 534, Boston 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 

441, Boston 
JOHN H. REYNOLDS, Teachers No. 

431, Cambridge 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Sheldon (Teachers No. 441, 
Boston) stated that in drafting the 
resolution with Delegate Carroll he had 
in mind the use of the radio in behalf 
of Organized Labor and that it reaf- 
firmed the action taken last year. He 
said he hoped the convention would vote 
to have the Executive Council go on the 
air at least once a month and next year 
a special assessment might be made to 
carry on this work which he felt would 
be very effective. 

Delegate Perkins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) felt that Resolution No. 59 
should be taken into consideration as it 
called for educational work through the 



70 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



medium of the press and would give 
work to printers. He felt it would be 
more effective than the radio. 

Delegate Sheldon (Teachers No. 441, 
Boston) rose to a point of order, stat- 
ing that Resolution No. 69 was before 
the convention, and not Resolution 

No. 59. 

Vice-President Caffrey ruled that the 
point of order was not well taken. 

Delegate Perkins continued by telling 
of a newspaper in Boston which em- 
ployed approximately 1200 employees 
while radio stations employed very few. 
He felt in the last analysis the medium 
of the press was more far-reaching than 
the radio. 

Delegate Russell (Bricklayers No. 3, 
Boston) said that the radio would be 
very valuable, particularly when legis- 
lation was being considered and hoped 
the incoming Executive Council would 
be given the right to go on the air and 
tell the people what they wanted. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, stated that 
no one would question the interest of 
the committee as regards the question 
of education because the committee was 
just as much concerned with newspaper 
publicity as publicity over the air, but 
would hate to have the convention do 
anything in a negative way on either 
method. He further stated that the 
position of the committee was to get 
the voice of Labor to the people of this 
Commonwealth anywhere, anytime, and 
any way. 

Delegate Lansing (Newspaper Press- 
men No. 3, Boston) stated that the print- 
ing trades particularly had more in 
common with the newspapers than any 
other medium of advertising but felt 
the activities, beliefs and policies of the 
Federation should be brought to the 
public. He agreed that both resolutions 
should be passed, but felt the delegates 
were more in favor of Resolution 59 
than 69. He said that personally he had 
no objections to radio programs. 

Delegate Tierney (Milk Wagon 
Drivers No. 380, Boston) wondered 
where the money was to come from for 
radio programs. He felt that trade 
unionists should educate their own 
families and that a big mistake was 
being made by forgetting to teach them 



the principles of Organized Labor. He 
said he was in favor of the resolution 
if it could be financed, but was opposed 
to radio if printers were to be put out 
of work. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) moved that Resolution 59 and 
69 be referred to the incoming Execu- 
tive Council with instructions to take 
such steps as would bring about the 
best results. 

Delegate Lynch (Paper Rulers No. 13, 
Boston) stated the matter of radio was 
much deeper than was realized. He said 
that radio was the most powerful engine 
of propaganda in this country and that 
newspapers were the last bulwark of 
democracy. He said that if the dele- 
gates wanted to do something of bene- 
fit, the money should be spent for news- 
paper advertising as that medium, in 
his opinion, would do the greatest 
amount of good for the greatest number 
of people. 

Delegate MacCallum (Typographical 
No. 13, Boston) hoped that if the mo- 
tion prevailed the Executive Council 
would take into consideration the con- 
dition of the newspapers in the country. 
He said that some had folded up and 
others amalgamated, leaving members 
of various crafts on the streets. He also 
stated that his union had spent hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars for relief 
of its members in the past few years 
and hoped the council would consider 
the workers employed in newspapers as 
against the number employed on radio. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) rose to sup- 
port the motion made by Delegate Nolan 
that both resolutions be referred to the 
incoming Executive Council. 

Delegate Doherty (Stereotypers No. 2, 
Boston) felt that Resolutions 59 and 69 
were two entirely different matters. No. 
59 advocated support of newspapers and 
No. 69 advocated spending money for 
radio advertising. 

The motion to refer Resolutions 59 
and 69 to the incoming Executive Coun- 
cil was then adopted. 

The convention then adjourned until 
Friday morning at 9:30. 



Massachusetts State Federation op Labor 



71 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1939 



MORNING SESSION 
The convention was called to order 
Friday morning by President Morrissey 
at 9:30. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of Com- 
mittee on Resolutions, continued his 
report: 

RESOLUTION NO. 59 

SUPPORT OF NEWSPAPER ADVER- 
TISING 

Whereas, We go on record at this convention 
as members of this progressive Massachusetts 
State Branch of American Federation of 
Labor for the safeguarding of the future wel- 
fare of our employment and income, and 

Whereas, We hereby encourage the use of 
newspaper advertising, in preference to radio 
advertising, and 

Whereas, The newspaper is a permanent 
reference medium, employing thousands of our 
affiliated brothers, working under good condi- 
tions and fair wages, with daily existence de- 
pending upon it, we must of necessity guard 
its patronage; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we pledge our support, our 
every effort, to encourage newspaper advertis- 
ing, with its many dependent employees, news- 
papers being permanent record. 

GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
JOHN HALLISEY, Newspaper Pressmen 

No. 3, Boston 
EDWARD T. MURRAY, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
GEORGE DOHERTY, Stereotypers No. 

2, Boston 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
THOMAS J. GETHINS, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
DUGALD MacCALLUM, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

Delegate Russell spoke as follows: 

Yesterday Resolution No. .59 was made a 
part of Resolution No. 69 and referred to the 
incoming Executive Council. Your Committee, 
through necessity, must report the resolution 
and state that they were going to concur in 
this resolution. 

Vice-President Hull was called to the 
chair. 

RESOLUTION NO. 68 

ESTABLISHMENT OF A LABOR 

NEWSPAPER 

Whereas, Massachusetts is without an ade- 
quate number of labor papers, and 

Whereas, The only means by which the 
controlled press may be offset is with the 
press directly responsible to the labor move- 
ment, and 

Whereas, The establishment of same is a 
difficult matter for labor organizations due 
to the expense involved, and 

Whereas, A general co-operation among af- 
filiated locals may accomplish much toward 
the attainment of the establishment of a 
Labor press in this state ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates instruct and 
authorize the Executive Council to call upon 



the officers of city central bodies and such 
other interested parties as may care to at- 
tend a meeting for the purpose of bringing 
about the establishment of a Labor press 
owned and controlled by the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor within the next 
year, and be it further 

Resolved, That ( ) be author- 
ized to expend a sum not exceeding $3,500 
in the interim. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90. 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006, Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 

244, Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel- & 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 

No. 366, Lawrence 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 
Ill, Lawrence 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 42 

USE OF NORTH GERMAN LLOYD LINE 

BY ANCIENT AND HONORABLE 

ARTILLERY COMPANY 

Whereas, The Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company of Boston has for one hundred 
and fifty years upheld the glorious tradition of 
American patriotism, and 

Whereas, The Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company of Boston has upon its roster 
some of the most distinguished names in the 
commonwealth, and 

WTiereas, American maritime interests and 
-American seamen deserve the support of all 
patriotic citizens; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention records its 
deep concern in learning that this venerable 



72 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



patriotic body has ignored American interests 
and has leased for its annual Bermuda cruise, 
the St. Louis of the North German Lloyd 
Line, and be it further 

Resolvtd, That this convention, in behalf 
of maritime interests in the United States, 
and unemployed American seamen, requests 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany of Boston to cancel its agreement with 
a company representing the Nazi totalitarian 
state, which stands for racial intolerance, re- 
ligious persecution, and Fascist dictatorship, 
and to lease for its cruise a steamship of 
a line friendly to the principles of true de- 
mocracy. 

FRANCIS NANGLE, Building Service 

Employees No. 124, Boston 
JOSEPH C. GUILBRAULT, Meat Cut- 
ters No. 224, Quincy 
HENRY H. BOWLER, Carpenters No. 

1416, New Bedford 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
W. H. DAVIS, Teamsters No. 42, Lynn 
PHILIP GUEST, Meat Cutters No. 214, 

Taunton 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 

441, Boston 
HARRY GRACES, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
JOHN J. KEARNEY. Hotel and Res- 
taurant Employees No. 34, Boston 
A. PEARLSTEIN, Teamsters No. 259, 

Boston 
E. A. JOHNSON, Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 73 

CONDEMNATION OF ATTEMPTS TO 

REDUCE WAGES OF TEACHERS AND 

OTHERS IN PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT 

Whereas, Attempts are now being made 
by certain vested interests to cut salaries 
and wages of workers employed by public 
bodies, and 

Whereas, Maintenance of salaries in public 
employment is vital to maintenance of wages 
in private industry ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention condemns 
absolutely all attempts to reduce salaries and 
wayes of teachers, government employees, 
building maintenance workers, and bridge 
tenders in public employ, and all other pub- 
lic employees. 

JAMES SHELDON, Teachers No. 441, 

Boston 
JOHN H. REYNOLDS, Teachers No. 431, 
Cambridge 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 45 

SUPPORT OF ADEQUATE TENURE 

LAW FOR TEACHERS 

Whereas, Security in the job is one of the 
foundation stones of Organized Labor and one 
of the things for which the Massachusetts 



State Federation of Labor has most consistently 
fought, and 

Whereas, The present tenure law for teachers 
in Massachusetts is in many respects madequate 
and in the case of married teachers affords 
little if any protection; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention reaffirm the 
action of the 1938 convention supporting an 
adequate tenure law for teachers, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor go on record as favoring an 
adequate tenure law for teachers and instruct 
its Legislative Agent to render such assistance 
as he can to the organized teachers of Massa- 
chusetts in securing the passage of such a law. 

FRANCIS NANGLE, Building Service 

Employees No. 124, Boston 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 441, 

Boston 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 244, 

Lawrence 
FREDERICK W. RINGDAHL, Central 

Labor Union, New Bedford 
SYLVIO H. LeBLANC, Barbers No. 447, 

New Bedford 
MANUEL SOUZA, Teamsters No. 59, 

New Bedford 
JOSEPH C. GUILBRAULT, Meat Cut- 
ters No. 224, Quincy 
HENRY H. BOWLES, Carpenters No. 

1416, New Bedford 
MAUD F. VAN VAERENEWYCK, 

Retail Clerks No. 796, Boston 
JOHN H. REYNOLDS, Teachers No. 

431, Cambridge 
JAMES P. MEEHAN, Painters No. 44, 

Lawrence 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers No. 

66, Boston 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
DOROTHY B. De LOID, Central Labor 

Union, New Bedford 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 28 

PUBLICATION OF TELEPHONE DI- 
RECTORY MORE FREQUENTLY 

Whereas, The New England Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. has disregarded the convenience 
of its subscribers and users of its service in 
extending the date of issue of its directories, 
and 

Whereas, Long before the expiration date 
of these telephone directories they are out- 
moded due to the addition of new subscribers 
and changes in address of other subscribers, 
along with possible new telephone numbers, 
which cause considerable delay to users of 
the telephone getting the person with whom 
they wish to speak, and 

Whereas, The public, whether subscribers 
or users, need an up-to-date telephone direc- 
tory and it is due them that their telephone 
directory be of real service rather than an 
inconvenience ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor, in convention assembled, re- 
quest that the New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. resume its former publication sched- 
ules, in order that the directories may be more 
complete and up-to-date, and be it further 

Resolved, That this body request its Sec- 
retary-Treasurer to communicate with Mr. 
J. E. Harrell, vice president and director of 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



73 



public relations at 40 Oliver street, Boston, 
Mass., and inform him of the action of this 
convention in this regard. 

J. F. BURKE. Typographical No. 310, 

Lowell 
PHILIP F. COYLE, Central Labor 

Union, Worcester 
JOHN H. GRIFFITH, Central Labor 

Union, Lowell 
THOMAS J. GETHINS, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 

176, Norwood 
DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 

Union, Norwood 
JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
DANIEL J. COLLINS, Central L-abor 

Union, Norwvod 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming Ex- 
ecutive Council with instructions to call 
a conference of those interested before 
action is taken. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 18 

STATE FUND FOR WORKMEN'S 
COMPENSATION 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor has in the past submitted and 
staunchly supported a bill for the establish- 
ment of a state fund for injured workmen 
before the Massachusetts Legislature, and 

Whereas, This bill, at the request of the 
53rd annual convention, was submitted once 
again to the Legislature this year and our 
stand in regard to its passage was re-af- 
firmed, and 

Whereas, Through the superhuman eflforts 
of our Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent 
Kenneth I. Taylor and the co-operation of 
loyal and devoted trade unionists throughout 
the state a roll call was obtained on this bill 
in the House of Representatives and the pas- 
sage of this, one of the most beneficial pieces of 
legislation which has been submitted was de- 
feated by a very small majority, and 

Whereas, Through this action of the Legis- 
lature Labor lost a major victory when it 
was within its grasp ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates to the 54th 
annual State Federation of Labor convention 
condemn all members of the State Legislature 
who opposed this bill and thereby effected its 
defeat, and be it further 

Resolved, That the legislative committee 
of the State Federation of Labor be instructed 
to re-submit the bill calling for the estab- 
lishment of a state fund for workmen's com- 
pensation to the next session of the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature and do all in its power 
to bring about its enactment into law. 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters 

No. Ill, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers 

No. 686, Lawrence 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 

Cooks No. 186, Boston 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 
Union, Lawrence 



RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 

477, Lawrence 
JOHN A. FUSCO, Building Laborers 

No. 175, Lawrence 
JOHN V. JAMS, Brewery Workers No. 

119, Lawrence 
JAMES H. SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 

90, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen 

No. 261, Lawrence 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) stated that there was 
another resolution dealing with the 
same subject which should be read for 
the benefit of the delegates. 

Chairman Russell complied by read- 
ing Resolution No. 39. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) suggested that for the benefit 
of the newer delegates, either Secretary- 
Treasurer Taylor or Delegate Johnson 
explain the situation briefly. 

Secretary Taylor spoke as follows: 

Our present Workmen's Compensation Act 
is optional, employers are not obliged to insure 
workers under its provisions. In other words 
no more than 50 per cent of Massachusetts 
workers are covered by the Act. Many of 
those not insured under the Act are among 
groups which insurance companies will not 
underwrite. 

A recent survey revealed that approximately 
$15,000,000 was being spent annually by em- 
ployers of Massachusetts to insure their em- 
ployees under the terms of the Workmen's 
Compensation Act. The survey also revealed that 
that amount of money — breaking it down to 
premium dollars — only 30 cents of each dollar 
spent by employers for this purpose reach the 
people for whom the Act was designed — the 
injured workmen. 

For years the State Federation of Labor 
has sponsored and advocated legislation to take 
the profit out of the system by eliminating 
insurance companies. This could be done by 
the creation of a State Fund for Workmen's 
Compensation, operated by the Commonwealth 
at cost, rather than by insurance companies 
at a tremendous profit. 

Today we have a Social Security Act which 
provides old age pensions, unemployment in- 
surance, aid for dependent mothers and chil- 
dren and the blind. The federal and state gov- 
ernments operate that system without the as- 
sistance of insurance companies — and without 
profit. 

The propositions before you today are: 

1. That the State Federation of Labor refile 
the bill to create a State Fund for Workmen's 
Compensation. 

2. To send the same proposal for a state 
fund to the people at the next election in 1940. 

Our experience has been that on Beacon Hill 
the insurance companies are well entrenched. 
We find those powerful interests quite able to 
"encourage," shall I say, lawmakers to vote 
against a State Fund for Workmen's Com- 
pensation. But this year the insurance com- 
panies, after having been successful for about 
10 years in blocking a roll call, were set back 



74 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



slightly. Many delegates will recall receiving 
letters and telegrams from our office urging 
you to contact your Representatives for a roll 
call vote on the measure, and because of this 
support we received the roll call in the House 
and only lost by a vote of 110 to 99. In the 
Senate we lost by six votes. 

If we could get the complete cooperation of 
all affiliated unions, it wouldn't be exaggera- 
tion to say that the time is near at hand when a 
state fund would be created instead of allowing 
tremendous profits to go to insurance companies. 
The insurance interests, of course, having sub- 
stantial sums available to fight such things, 
and if money has any bearing on the outcome 
then we probably have two striked on us before 
we start. On the other hand, if the voters 
are misled by the propaganda that these power- 
ful interests will spread, and the state fund 
was rejected by the people, you would be lessen- 
ing the chances of passing it in the Legis- 
lature. It would be my opinion to refile the 
proposition at the 1941 session of the Legis- 
lature and refer the matter of placing the 
matter on the ballot to the Executive Council 
for further consideration. I think that with 
proper action on our part we_ could gain the 
few votes needed to enact this measure into 
law. If the proper demonstration is made I 
think the lawmakers would be impressed. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos Workers 
No. 6, Boston) spoke on the resolution, 
as follows: 

For many years Labor has advocated the use 
of the initiative and referendum and we have 
worked along that line by presenting bills to 
the Legislature asking for social legislation 
that would benefit workers — not only the or- 
ganized workers but workers generally — and 
for 20 years we have requested a state fund 
bill and then supported amendments to the 
Workmen's Compensation Act by cutting down 
the waiting time, increasing the compensation, 
increasing specific benefits and things like that. 
It has been inconsistent on our part to do 
those things because our bill was the Utopia 
to bring about that which we were striving 
for. Nobody has been defeated because of 
their vote against the State Fund for Work- 
men's Compensation in this state. Now the 
time has come when we should take our case 
to the people, both to the organized and un- 
organized workers of Massachusetts. Don't re- 
submit the bill. Nobody has ever been de- 
feated. Nobody need have any fear. What 
else is left for us but to go to the people? 

I have talked with Bob Watt and told him 
about the resolution we had put in for the 
first time in 20 years, definitely instructing 
the officers to place this measure on the ballot 
for the consideration of the voters of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. He said, "I feel 
keenly about it and if it goes on the bal- 
lot, and if the officers are definitely in- 
structed, I would be tickled to death to come 
back to Massachusetts and fight on that bill." 
We have heard Bob Watt many times tell of 
the cases he has fought. We have heard of 
the actions of the insurance companies. We 
want a State Fund. We want to be different 
from any other state. This was the first 
state to adopt a workmen's compensation law. 
We will not influence the Legislature unless 
we go to the people. I don't think we should 
resubmit the bill. I think we should go to the 
people. 

Delegate Carroll (Cement Finishers 
No. 534, Boston) stated if the conven- 
tion did but one thing, accept the reso- 
lution, it would have done well. He 



said that he favored the hard way of 
going about it and said he presumed 
the resolution provided for sending the 
matter to referendum. 

Delegate Russell advised that there 
was nothing about the initiative and 
referendum in the resolution before the 
convention — Resolution No. 18. 

Delegate Carroll continued, stating 
that he felt the insurance companies 
would continue to allow us to lose by 
one or two votes. He said that he was 
not necessarily sympathetic to going to 
the people through the initiative and 
referendum unless it was on something 
concrete and that we must be prepared 
to spend money by going on the radio 
and otherwise. He said that to fight 
the insurance interests was a great task,* 
but that people had become more insur- 
ance-minded than ever. He spoke of 
the Boston Post as being the first paper 
to expose the insurance racket, notwith- 
standing the fact that Federation secre- 
taries had been talking about the insur- 
ance racket for years but were unable 
to get any publicity. 

Delegate Gethins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) said that he was in favor 
of appealing to the people in the case 
of Labor and spoke of the previous 
day's discussion regarding the use of 
radio and newspaper, stating that he 
felt the printed word was by far more 
important than radio. 

Delegate McDonald (Iron Workers No. 
7, Boston) rose to a point of order, 
stating that Delegate Gethins was not 
speaking on the question. 

Vice-President Hull ruled that the 
point of order was well taken and re- 
quested Delegate Gethins to confine his 
remarks to the question. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) spoke of the number of 
men being put out of work by employ- 
ers because of premium demands by 
insurance companies, that the matter 
had been considered by many as the 
reason for so many men and women 
between the ages of 40 and 60 being dis- 
charged. He stated that he was doubt- 
ful, however, whether it would be ad- 
visable to go to referendum, a matter 
which Henry Sterling had worked on 
for many years. He felt the bill should 
be filed again and that more active work 
be done by calling it to the attention 
of the public as well as Representatives 
and Senators. He said the Executive 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



75 



Council should appoint an active com- 
mittee and request the cooperation of 
all affiliated unions and sympathetic 
groups. 

The motion was then adopted. 

President Morrissey resumed the 

chair. 

RESOLUTION NO. 39 

REFERENDUM IN 1940 ON STATE FUND 
FOR WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 

Whereas, Since 1920, the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor has fought unsuc- 
cessfully through the Legislature for enact- 
ment of a state fund for workmen's com- 
pensation, and 

Whereas, We now believe the time has 
come to attempt by other means to bring 
about this important legislation ; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor go on record as instructing its officers 
and Executive Council to bring about an 
initiative and referendum on this important 
question, to be placed on the ballot in 1940. 
E. A. JOHNSON, Asbestos Workers No. 

6, Boston 
CHARLES P. BUCKLEY, Electrical 

Workers No. 103, Boston 
JAMES T. KILROE, Electrical Work- 
ers No. 103, Boston 
WILLIAM J. DOYLE, Electrical Work- 
ers No. 103, Boston 
GEORGE GIBBS, Musicians No. 9, Bos- 
ton 
EDWARD C. CARROLL, Electrical 

Workers No. 103, Boston 
WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN, Electrical 

Workers No. 103, Boston 
TIMOTHY F. CALLAHAN, Plumbers 
No. 12, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 



Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Meehan (Painters No. 44, 
Lawrence) stated that he had supported 
Labor's request for a State Fund for 
Workmen's Compensation for many 
years, especially while he was a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate and felt the delegates 
should .not fool themselves, because a 
state fund could not be passed in Mas- 
sachusetts unless there was a change. 
He called attention to the fact that at 
last a roll call vote was obtained in 
the House of Representatives, but still 
the measure did not pass. He said that 
there was only one insurance company 
in Massachusetts which would admit it 
could operate successfully, all others 
claim they lose money on workmen's 
compensation. He cited instances of in- 
surance companies refusing to under- 
write coverage because of the nature 
of the occupations involved. He felt 
that the best opportunity of enacting 
the measure into law was in 1935 when 



former Secretary - Treasurer Watt did 
not press for a roll call but had the 
law amended. He said that when the 
matter is being considered all employ- 
ees of insurance companies are told to 
contact their Representatives and Sena- 
tors and urge them to vote against the 
bill because they are threatened with 
the loss of their jobs if it is passed 
and that there should be no mistake 
about the tremendous pressure brought 
by the insurance company employees on 
members of the House and Senate. He 
felt the resolution had a great deal of 
merit and that by sending the matter 
to the people Labor had nothing to lose. 

Delegate Pagnano (Granite Cutters, 
Quincy) stated that regardless of what 
was said, if the cooperation of the va- 
rious unions was not extended to the 
Legislative Agent, Labor could not put 
the state fund through in this state. 
He told of his trade and that because 
of hazards of the industry his members 
could not get the insurance. He spoke 
of the holiday declared by the molders 
union of Taunton in 1936, at which time 
they hired buses and went to the State 
House in large numbers. He said he 
believed that such demonstrations by 
all of Labor would be very helpful in 
obtaining the desired legislation. 

Secretary Taylor called attention to 
the tremendous expense entailed if the 
intent of the resolution was carried out 
and that the treasury of the State Fed- 
eration only amounted to $20,000. He 
felt that an assessment of some kind 
would have to be levied to carry out 
the action of the convention. 

Delegate Johnson (Asbestos No. 6, 
Boston) agreed that the matter would 
entail a great deal of expense but felt 
the State Federation was organized to 
do just such work and that the funds 
should not be held in reserve but should 
be used for just such specific cases. 

Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) agreed with Delegate 
Johnson, stating that local unions save 
their funds for strikes, but the State 
Federation should use their funds for 
such purposes and should not create 
surpluses. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Russell continued his report 
for the Committee on Resolutions, stat- 
ing that he would report on Resolutions 
Nos. 46, 47, 48 and 61 simultaneously 
as they were similar: 



76 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



RESOLUTION NO. 46 

condemnation OF RELIGIOUS IN- 
TOLERANCE, HATRED AND 
PERSECUTION 

Whereas, In certain European countries 
the governments have unceasingly oppressed 
and persecuted minority religious groups and 
the trade union movement, and 

Whereas, Catholics, Protestants and Jews 
have been molested, imprisoned and their 
properties confiscated by these governments 
for no other reason than their religious be- 
liefs, and 

Whereas, Efiforts have been made to sow 
seeds of religious intolerance in the United 
States which threaten the fundamental prin- 
ciples of our democracy, and 

Whereas, The American labor movement 
has always opposed religious, political and in- 
dustrial persecution in any country ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor, assembled at its 54th annual 
convention, condemns such practices of reli- 
gious intolerance, hatred and persecution and 
calls on all its members to stand by the 
principle established by the fathers of Ameri- 
can liberty in the Bill of Rights, and further 
calls on each affiliated organization to guard 
against any possible inroads which might un- 
dermine the principles of American democ- 
racy. 

DUGALD MacCALLUM, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
THOMAS J. GETHINS, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 
, JOHN M. SULLIVAN, Teamsters No. 
25, Boston 
PHILIP GUEST, Meat Cutters No. 214, 

Taunton 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 

Cooks No. 186, Boston 
BENJAMIN G. HULL, Central Labor 
Union, Westfield 
■ DAVID F. LOONEY, Firemen and Oil- 
ers No. 3, Boston 
CARL WALZ, Central Labor Union, 
Greenfield 



RESOLUTION NO. 47 

CONDEMNATION OF NAZISM AND 
FASCISM 

Whereas, The Nazis and Fascists have 
destroyed the rights and privileges of free 
men and women, and forced them to slave 
day and night for the pomp and glory of 
the totalitarian state and the profit of the 
Fascist few, and 

Whereas, They stir up racial and religious 
hatred, and 

Whereas, As Bob Watt has said, "Any 
American who uses the utterly vicious false- 
hoods of Goebbels and Gayda, whether to 
smear a race or a religion or a class or a 
nation or a nation's President, is blacker than 
the worst Benedict Arnold of our history" ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the 54th convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor in- 
struct its incoming Executive Council to use 
all the methods at its disposal to combat this 
insidious poison and to do its part in pro- 
tecting Massachusetts, and its people from 
these Benedict Arnolds. 

MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 

Boston 
HARRY A. RUSSELL, Engineers No. 
849, Boston 



RESOLUTION NO. 48 

SUPPORT OF BRITISH LABOR MOVE- 
MENT'S ATTITUDE TOWARD JEWS 

Whereas, Over twenty years ago in the 
Balfour Declaration, the British government 
declared Palestine as a Jewish homeland, 
opening that country to Jewish immigration 
and development of its resources, and 

Whereas, During these years Palestine has 
been a haven of refuge for the persecuted 
Jews of central and eastern Europe, and 

Whereas, The Jews have developed Pales- 
tine from a wasteland to a land of progress 
in agriculture and industrjr through toil in 
the fields and in the factories, and 

Whereas, At a time when persecution of 
Jews in Europe is the darkest in history 
with every other haven of refuge closed to 
those hundreds of thousands driven from their 
own countries for no other reason than their 
religious beliefs, the British government has 
seen fit to close the gates of Palestine ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor, assembled at its 54th 
annual convention, hails the stand taken by 
the British labor movement in protest against 
the action of their government and appeals 
to the civilized world that the gates of Pales- 
tine be reopened to the oppressed and home- 
less Jews of Europe so that opportunity may 
be aft'orded them to live by the "sweat of 
their brows." 

MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 

Boston 
HARRY A. RUSSELL, Engineers No. 
849. Boston 



RESOLUTION NO. 61 

CONDEMNATION OF UNDEMOCRATIC 
TACTICS AND FORMS OF GOVERN- 
MENT 

Whereas, The peace of the world is threat- 
ened by the aggression of fascist and nazi 
nations, who feed upon their weaker neigh- 
bors as well as upon the downtrodden people 
of their own lands, and 

Whereas, The same countries have out- 
lawed and brutally destroyed bona fide unions 
of their workers, and 

Whereas, Our President has taken a posi- 
tion of praiseworthy leadership in the fight 
to preserve democracy in the world and to 
prevent the spread of fascism and nazisni, 
and 

Whereas, In the words of Robert Watt, 
the modern Benedict Arnolds are those who 
by word or deed support or give comfort 
to the followers of these anti-democratic sys- 
tems ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we commend the present 
foreign policy of the President, and especially 
his effort to bring about legislation under 
which we would give the aid of our eco 
nomic might to democracies in time of dan- 
ger of fascist aggression, and be it further 

Resolved, That we especially commend the 
voiding of the 1911 trade treaty with Japan 
and the imposition of added duties on nazi 
imports, having in mind that those who trade 
with either these or any other fascist or 
nazi country are aiding our enemies, and that 
the tradition of Organized Labor ^n demo- 
cratic America demands that we boycott all 
goods from such countries, and cease to ex- 
port all goods from such countries, and cease 
to e.xport to them goods or supplies neces- 
sary to the prosecution of war, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That we commend especially the 
part which our government has_ taken through 
the International Labor Organization in bet- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



77 



tering the standards of Lalior and strpiiRtli 
of Organized Labor, as a first Ijulwark 
against fascism. 

JAMES 11. SHELDON, Teachers No. 

441, Boston 
WILLIAM BJORK, Painters Union No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 

Handlers, Plate Boys and Press 

Clerks No. 21, Boston 
ABE PEARLSTEIN, Teamsters No. 

259, Boston 
THOMAS J. GETHINS, Typographical 

No. 13, Boston 
MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 

Boston 
FRANK C. BURKE, Lathers No. 142, 

Waltham 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
ADAM KURTZ, Carpenters No. 1372, 

Easthampton 

Delegate Russell spoke as follows: 

These resolutions have one purpose. They 
emanated from one group and have been given 
much consideration by your Committee on Reso- 
lutions. The committee recommends as a sub- 
stitute for these resolutions, one resolution 
which is decidedly American. These resolutions 
are concerned with nazism, fascism and totali- 
tarianism and in each of these resolutions, 
wherever they come from, not one reference 
was made to the "ism" that gives us much 
concern — communism. It was omitted from 
every one of the resolutions. We are still the 
American Federation of Labor and deeply con- 
cerned with the country we are living in and 
therefore we are concerned, too, about com- 
munism. That is the position of your com- 
mittee. 

RESOLUTION NO. 88 

CONDEMNATION OF UN-AMERICAN 

PRACTICES AND FORMS OF 

GOVERNMENT 

Whereas, The nazis and fascists have de- 
stroyed the rights and privileges of free men 
and women, and forced them to slave day and 
night for the pomp and glory of the totali- 
tarian state, and 

Whereas, The American Labor Movement is 
deeply concerned with any movement which has 
a bearing on our continued existence as a peer 
and democratic institution, and 

Whereas, The first interest of the American 
Labor Movement is a better America and a 
better American Labor Movement; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor continue its opposition to 
nazism, fascism and communism; and be it 
further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor assembled at its 54th annual 
convention, condemns such practices of religious 
intolerance, hatred and persecution and calls 
on all its members to stand by the principle 
established by the fathers of American liberty 
in the Bill of Rights, and further calls on each 
aflfiliated organization to guard against any pos- 
sible inroads which might undermine the prin- 
ciples of American democracy. 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be substituted for Resolutions 
Nos. 46, 47, 48 and 61. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 



Delegate Lynch (Paper Rulers No. 13, 
Boston) moved that the resolution be 
amended by striking out the first 
whereas. 

Delegate Lynch stated that it was 
time the American Federation of Labor 
and its affiliated organizations stopped 
advertising communism, nazism, fascism 
and other "isms" and that a good re- 
affirmation of American principles was 
all that was needed. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food Work- 
ers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) expressed 
opposition to the amendment because 
he felt by keeping such facts under 
cover they could not be successfully 
subdued and hoped the report of the 
committee would be adopted, thus carry 
out Americanism. 

Delegate Russell spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

The Resolutions Committee has no tricks up 
their sleeves. We made our observations and 
gave them to you. Your committee feels that 
if we lack the nerve to condemn, then per- 
haps we are so weak that we condone. We 
are taking the position against totalitarianism 
states regardless of who they are. I would 
like to add^ a few more — perhaps Italy and 
Japan and Spain, if you please — but we wanted 
to do one thing to defend ourselves against 
these things and we cannot do that unless we 
tell the cockeyed world we are against them. 
We wanted to emphasize that we are Ameri- 
cans and will do everything to defend that 
Americanism. 

Delegate Hamlin (Meat Cutters No. 
618, Boston) agreed with the Resolu- 
tions Committee and expressed regret 
that as a signer of three resolutions 
the word "communism" was omitted and 
felt the committee did a good job by 
inserting it. He stated that any dic- 
tatorship was detrimental to the inter- 
ests of the working class of the world 
and felt the substitute resolution stated 
the exact position of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. Resolution No. 48, 
however, dealt with one group, the Jew- 
ish, and felt that it should be acted 
upon separately as it was a very im- 
portant matter for 17,000,000 people who 
have been driven from hell to hell with 
no place to go. 

Delegate Russell spoke as follows: 

I respect the position of Brother Hamlin 
about these millions of Jewish people. The 
State Federation has been interested for 25 
years, to my knowledsje. and it seems each 
time we leave Massachusetts to go into other 
governments across the water we get into 
trouble. Your Resolutions Committee very 
definitely picked out the totalitarian states, re- 
ligious interference and persecution of down- 
trodden peoples everywhere. Your committee 



78 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



did not feel that we have a right in Massa- 
chusetts to take up the affairs of the British 
government at this particular time. I don't 
like striking out the whereas and I hope the 
original motion is adopted. 

Delegate Flaherty (Painters No. 11, 
Boston) told of the time when the State 
Federation, central labor unions and 
every labor union in the state and prac- 
tically every local throughout the coun- 
try interfered with the program of the 
British government and were so effec- 
tive that for the iirst time in 11 cen- 
turies they established a form of free- 
dom for a country that was persecuted 
for centuries — Ireland. He stated that 
the resolution dealing with the Jewish 
people should be acted upon separately. 

Delegate Thompson (Carpenters No. 
878, Beverly) stated that after listening 
to all the arguments he wondered 
whether it was a Jewish question, an 
Irish question, an English question or 
a question of Americanism. He felt 
that the delegates should deal with 
Massachusetts matters and that there 
was a sufficient number of matters to 
consider without going into "isms." He 
stated that if more time were given to 
the Massachusetts Labor Movement than 
to such questions, trade unionism would 
be better off. 

Delegate Russell again spoke on the 
matter, as follows: 

We are asking for a bit of deep concern 
on the part of the standing of the Massachu- 
setts Labor Movement. We can't have too 
much concern with anything outside of the 
State of Massachusetts. We do feel there 
are social and economic and political forces 
at work outside the confines of Massachusetts 
that have a bearing upon our continued ex- 
istence that is all too embracing in this reso- 
lution. That is a fact, and what shall be 
the position of the Massachusetts Labor Move- 
ment? 

Your Resolutions Committee took one blanket 
position to condemn any forces that might have 
an effect upon us in our homes and in our 
land that we call our own. Shouldn't we be 
satisfied with the position of our body — 
against that sort of thing? Then in the second 
instance we say, "By God that is true but 
what are we going to do about it?" Our 
answer is to build and build so that they will 
never reach the shores or the boundary lines 
of America. 

The amendment offered by Delegate 
Lynch was defeated. 

The motion to adopt the resolution 
recommended by the Committee on Res- 
olutions as a substitute for Resolutions 
Nos. 46, 47, 48 and 61 was then adopted. 



resolution no. 9 

disapproval of remarks di- 
RECTED AT vice-president 
JOHN N. garner 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor, representing more than 500,000 
organized wage earners and as an advocate of 
progressive legislation for 1,500,000 unorganized 
men and women of Massachusetts, utters a 
protest regarding the language alleged to have 
been used by a leader of a dual organization 
at a congressional labor committee hearing in 
Washington, D. C, in July, 1939, in which 
he is said to have insulted the person and 
reputation of Honorable John Nance Garner, 
Vice-President of the United States, who, with 
President Roosevelt was elected by vote of 
the citizens of 46 states, an honor never be- 
fore accorded candidates for President and 
Vice-President; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That such alleged intemperate lan- 
guage can result only in serious reaction by 
the American public, directly and indirectly 
threatening to jeopardize progress made by the 
American Federation of Labor during a cen- 
tury of untiring effort and the sacrifice of time, 
energy and money by men and women en- 
listed for human uplift. 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical No. 
13, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

After the voice vote was doubted, the 
motion was adopted by a standing vote, 
152 to 31. 

Delegate Murphy (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 319, Lawrence) rose 
to a point of information, and asked 
whether the Resolutions Committee had 
purposely left out the parts of the 
original resolution as called for in the 
first lines of the first resolve. 

Delegate Russell stated they were 
omitted by consent of the sponsor of 
the resolution as the committee would 
not have reported favorably on the reso- 
lution as originally presented. He said 
that Labor men were expected to show 
respect for the office of President and 
Vice-President of the United States, as 
had been displayed when the Governor 
of the Commonwealth had appeared be- 
fore the convention — respect for the of- 
fice and not necessarily for the man. 

Delegate Murray (Newspaper Press- 
men No. 3, Boston) stated that he had 
voted in the affirmative on the previous 
resolution and therefore moved that ac- 
tion on Resolution No. 9 be recon- 
sidered. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenographers No. 
14965, Boston) rose to a point of order, 
stating that a matter could not be re- 
considered unless other business had 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



79 



been transacted subsequent to action 
on which reconsideration was sought. 

President Morrissey ruled that the 
point of order was well taken. 

RESOLUTION NO. 3 

RESTORATION OF PREVAILING WAGE 

PROVISION IN EMERGENCY 

RELIEF BILL 

Whereas, A coalition of reactionary repre- 
sentatives and senators have joined in a ne- 
farious scheme to undermine union wages and 
conditions of work by requiring skilled work- 
ers to work the same number of hours for 
the same so-called security wage as unskilled 
workers, despite the permanent value of the 
WPA construction projects which might 
otherwise be built under contract at union 
hours and wages, and 

Whereas, These reactionary congressmen 
seem to regard WPA workers as beggars who 
can't be choosers even though these Ameri- 
can citizens are forced onto WPA purely 
because of their inability to find regular work 
on which they can earn enough to support 
their families in the American standard of 
living, and 

Whereas, This last-minute maneuver of the 
reactionaries is a cruel and cowardly blow 
at the economic and social welfare of union 
members, whose independence and self-respect 
they secretly fear and dare to challenge only 
in the secrecy of last-minute voice vote; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the 54th convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor de- 
nounce this cowardly attack against the 
American standard of living so largely de- 
veloped by the courage and skill of union 
members, and be it further 

Resolved, That each Massachusetts con- 
gressman and senator be asked to demon- 
strate publicly his attitude by accomplishing 
the restoration of the hours and wages pro- 
visions of the previous WPA law and the 
elimination of the present disqualification of 
those unfortunate enough to have had to 
depend on WPA projects for eighteen 
months, and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution be submitted 
to the 54th convention of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of labor for the co-opera- 
tion and support of all other affiliated unions. 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters 

No. Ill, Lawrence 
CHARLES L. ANNAN, Moving Picture 

Operators No. 256, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters 

No. 551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1215, Methuen 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 
Union, Lawrence 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Murray (Newspaper Press- 
men No. 3, Boston) moved that action 
on Resolution No. 9 be reconsidered. 

The motion was adopted. 



Delegate Murray moved that the re- 
port of the Resolutions Committee be 
amended by substituting the original 
Resolution No. 9. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) stated that the resolution was 
not for Garner nor was it a question 
of C.LO. or A.F.L. but was presented 
because of an insult against the Vice- 
President of the United States. 

Delegate Perkins (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) hoped the resolution would 
not be adopted because he felt that if it 
were a leader of the A. F. of L. the 
resolution would not have been intro- 
duced and by adopting the resolution 
it may be taken by the public as an 
endorsement of the Vice-President of 
the United States. 

Delegate Bjork (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) was opposed to adoption of the 
resolution because he, too, felt it would 
be taken as an endorsement of Vice- 
President Garner. He stated that he 
held no brief for Lewis but had to give 
him credit for saying what he thought 
of Garner which, he said, was similarly 
done by the head of the A. F. of L. 
in Texas. 

Delegate Russell spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

Your committee had quite a knotty problem 
in this resolution. As chairman, I would not 
even have spoken one good word if it could 
be construed as an endorsement of Garner for 
President or perhaps Vice-President of the 
United States. There is, however, an efiFort 
on the part of the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor to maintain public respect. 
There were some things in this resolution that 
had the earmarks of going further than your 
committee felt it should. ^Ve feel that we 
should show the general public that Labor is 
understanding, intelligent and a respecting 
group. 

I personally think it is a questionable reso- 
lution. The intent and purpose of Delegate 
Nolan who presented it was to maintain the 
dignity and the voice of the American Labor 
Movement as against those who look for cheap 
publicity and make statements of this nature 
just to get their names in the paper. We 
don't like it. I don't think free lance Labor 
men anywhere can speak for you and I. The 
purpose of this resolution is that we reserve 
the right to talk about the President of the 
United States on his labor attitude. That_ is 
our job.- But when it comes to personal habits, 
for instance, let us reserve ourselves and do 
the right thing at the right time. 

The amendment to substitute the 
original Resolution No. 9 for the Com- 
mittee on Resolution's recommendation 
was defeated. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenographers No. 
14965, Boston) moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 



80 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



After the voice vote was doubted, the 
motion was adopted by a standing vote, 
138 to 42. 

Vice-President Grages was called to 
the chair. 

RESOLUTION NO. 8 

COMMENDATION FOR PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor I'ecords its appreciation to 
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt for 
many evidences of sympathetic understand- 
ing and co-operation with the aims, hopes 
and aspirations of wage earners, organized 
and unorganized, supporting in great meas- 
ure the leadership and policies of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor and affiliated unions 
throughout the United States ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That reactionary forces, drunk 
with power, are engaged in activities with 
the objective of destroying economic progress 
made during incumbency of President Roose- 
velt in his promotion of social security and 
giving to the common man some measure 
through legislation of political and economic 
protection, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy hereof be sent to 
President Roosevelt and given to the press. 
THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 14 

THIRD TERM FOR PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT 

Whereas, Six years of the national adminis- 
tration have proven conclusively its sympathy 
and friendship to Organized Labor and its 
ideals through the enactment of numerous pro- 
labor laws, and 

Whereas, The passage of such legislation as 
the Wages-Hours Act, the Social Security Act, 
Unemployment Insurance and the Wagner 
Act — which, despite any deficiencies, still re- 
mains the bill of rights of Labor — and 

Whereas, Legislation has been passed de- 
signed to improve the general well-being of the 
people, safeguard their rights and interests, at 
the same time providing for jobs and recovery 
through the enactment of the Federal Housing 
Bill, WPA and PWA and making provisions 
that our needy citizens should not starve, and 

Whereas, It is a matter of vital concern 
afTecting the whole future of Organized Labor 
that such necessary social legislation be retained 
on the statute books to safeguard Labor's in- 
terests, and 

WTiereas, A concerted drive is no»v under 
way by the enemies of Labor of the National 
Association of Manufacturers type, who seek 
to destroy all of the progress made by Labor 
in the last six years; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the fifty-fourth annual con- 
vention of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor go on record as endorsing present 
policies in general and the magnificent leader- 
ship of President Roosevelt in particular, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That we strongly urge President 
Roosevelt to listen tp the voice of Labor and 



the voice of the people, who demand, regardless 
of third term bugaboos, that he continue to 
work out his policies that will benefit the people 
of America, since the enemies within both polit- 
ical parties have united to knife all progressive, 
social and labor legislation, and be it finally 

Resolved, That we instruct our delegates to 
the forthcoming national convention of the 
American Federation of Labor to support and 
work for the passage of a third term resolu- 
tion. 

JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 

Cooks No. 186, Boston 
HOWARD H. LITCHFIELD, Cambridge 

Central Labor Union 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 441, 

Boston 
EDWARD J. MILLER, Electrical 

Workers No. 104, Boston 
NATHAN A. HIGGINS, Teamsters No. 

35 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers No. 

66, Boston 
GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 
Pressmen No. 3, Boston 

The committee recommended that the 
resolution be referred to the incoming 
Executive Council. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food 
Workers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) stated 
that he had been in favor of President 
Roosevelt in 1932 and again in 1936, but 
was opposed to a third term for him. 
He felt that actions in Washington 
should be the guide and spoke of actions 
of Cordell Hull, Secretary of State. 
He said that moves should be cautiously 
made and if liberal legislation was to be 
sought, candidates should be selected 
who would espouse liberal legislation. 

Delegate Russell spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

I would like to explain to the delegates the 
reasons for your committee's action. I doubt 
whether anyone in the hall will question that in 
the United States in the next 13 months we 
will have momentous problems before us as to 
who we will want as President. I think it 
unwise here to take such action. If we were 
to urge a third term for Roosevelt, even if it 
were adopted, your committee is apprehensive 
as to what might happen. Your Executive 
Council will be confronted and will have tc 
answer. In my short career I felt there were 
men whom Labor should embrace and within 
two weeks I felt it would have been a tragedy 
if we had endorsed such persons. It might be 
the necessary and the most patriotic thing to 
do, but I don't think we should tie the hands 
of the Executive Council and instruct them. 
We hesitate to urge a third term and we_ are 
equally hesitant about putting ourselves in a 
position so it could not be done. 

Delegate Stefani (Cooks and Pastry 
Cooks No. 186, Boston) said he was in 
favor of the recommendation of the 
committee. He said he introduced the 
resolution to show his gratitude to the 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



81 



President of the United States as in his 
opinion he was the first President of the 
country to do so much for Labor. He 
stated it was a non-partisan proposi- 
tion and that the policy of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor was always to 
elect our friends and defeat our 
enemies. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) stated 
he had been chairman of the Labor 
division of Massachusetts in 1932 and 
1936 for the election of Roosevelt and 
was ready to do his bit again if he ran 
for a third term. He commended the 
delegates for adopting Resolution No. 8 
and emphasized that reference of Reso- 
lution No. 14 to the Council did not 
mean the State Federation was opposed 
to a third term, but simply that the 
Federation was being cautious and 
would be prepared in the event any- 
thing should happen. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Cenerazzo (Sea Food 
Workers No. 1572-1, Gloucester) re- 
quested that he and the other three 
delegates from the local union which he 
represented be recorded as being 
against Resolution No. 14. 

Delegate Fleming (Central Labor 
Union, Holyoke) requested that he be 
recorded as being against Resolution 
No. 14. 

President Morrissey resumed the 
chair. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) moved 
that the rules be suspended and that 
the convention recess at 1 o'clock and 
reconvene at 2 o'clock and then remain 
in morning session until 4 o'clock. 

The motion was adopted. 

President Morrissey announced the 
drawing for the union label gifts would 
take place with Delegate Casey in 
charge. The winners were: 

Thomas Boyle, Hotel and Restaurant Em- 
ployees No. 34, Boston; Emmett Cudahy, Bak- 
ery Wagon Drivers No. 686, Lawrence; Michael 
Norton, Teamsters No. 25, Boston; J. Arthur 
Moriarty, Typographical No. 13, Boston; John 
J. Larkin, Government Employees No. S2, 
Boston; Edward T. Gay, Printing Pressmen 
No. 67, Boston: Elizabeth .T. Hanley, Central 
Labor Union, Fitchburg; Thomas J. Ggthins, 
Typographical No. 13, Boston; David Sandler, 
Carbonated Beverage and Liquor Salesmen 
No. 831, Boston: Gertrude Jones, Telephone 
Operators, No. B-1120, Boston; Matthew A. 
Dunn, Milk Wagon Drivers No. 380, Bostot\; 



Paul Mikonis, Paper Makcr.s No. 204, Haver- 
hill; John Carroll, Cement Finishers No. .534, 
Boston; George Dooley, Enamel Workers No. 
103, Taunton; Nicholas P. Morrissey, Team- 
sters No. 2.5, Boston; .Michael Flaherty, 
Painters No. II, Boston; .Michael J. Sullivan, 
Coal and Fuel Drivers No. 68, Boston; Michael 
J. Holland, Steamfitters No. 537, Boston; John 
E. P'innigan, Hotel and Restaurant P^mployees 
No. 34, Boston; Harry P. Hogan, Central 
Labor Union, .Springfield; Gerrit Oldenbrook. 
Retail Clerks No. 1445, Boston; Horace Caron, 
Carpenters No. 1305, Fall River: Alfred 
Haase, Paper Makers No. 372, Fitchburg; 
Hanna Faterson, Teachers No. 230, Northamp- 
ton; Cecelia Nicholson, Women's Trade Cnion 
League, Worcester; John F. Donovan, Coal and 
Fuel Drivers No. 68, I'oston : Thomas Lough- 
ran, Building Service Employees No. 175, 
Boston; James Lenehan, Retail Clerks No. 1445, 
Boston; Michael R. Gomes, Engineers No. 471 
New Bedford; N. Hurwitz, Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston; William Biork, Painters No. 
11, Boston; Albert C. Marr, Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees No. 34, Boston; and 
John H. Leonard, Street Carmen No. 261, 
Lawrence. 

The convention then recessed until 
2 o'clock. 

The convention was called to order by 
President Morrissey at 2 o'clock. 

Delegate Russell, Chairman of the 
Committee on Resolutions, continued 
the report of the committee: 

RESOLUTION NO. 34 

WAGES AND WORKING CONDITIONS 
IN MENTAL HEALTH HOSPITALS 

Whereas, The employees of the state depart- 
ment of mental health are now governed by 
such laws, rules and regulations of the depart- 
ment of mental health that do not conform to 
the present day labor standards, and 

Whereas, These laws, rules and regulations 
deprive the employees of the state department 
of mental health of such privileges as are now 
enjoyed by the employees of other state depart- 
ments, and 

Whereas, These laws, rules and regulations 
prohibit employees from receiving their proper 
rating with subsequent loss of pay for actual 
work performed, and 

Whereas, There are no definite rulings in the 
department of mental health regarding vaca- 
tions, sick leave and leave of absence, and 

Whereas, Such sick leave, leave of absence 
and vacations are left to the discretion of the 
several institution superintendents and the com- 
missioner of mental health, to be given or taken 
away as desired, and 

Whereas. Some of the employees of this de- 
partment have their eight hours of work 
stretched over a twelve-hour period, and 

Whereas, The department of administration 
and finance in the commonwealth allows only 
so many positions of a kind in an institution, 
regardless of the amount of work that neces- 
sarily must be accomplished, that in some 
cases the actual amount of employees serving 
in a particular position is three or four times 
greater than the amount of emploj-ees allowed 
and the employees serving in this position are 
unable to receive the compensation allowed the 
position, and 

Whereas, All the positions in the institutions 
of the department of mental health are under- 
paid and in some sections overworked because 
of lack of sufficient help, and 



82 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Whereas, Forced resignations, discharges and 
voluntary resignations among the employees of 
the various institutions, especially at Danvers, 
is detrimental to the best interests of the 
patients confined in the institutions and costly 
to the commonwealth and the department of 
mental health, and 

Whereas, The actions of the officials toward 
the employees gives rise to the belief that faith- 
ful service will go unrewarded, and 

Whereas, The employees of the institutions, 
especially at Danvers and Worcester, have or- 
ganized themselves under the banner of the 
American Federation of Labor and have pledged 
themselves not to strike or cease work because 
of labor difficulties, are striving to better condi- 
tions in the department of mental health, and 

Whereas, Union negotiations with the officials 
of the institutions and the department of men- 
tal health have only developed into verbal 
agreements, and 

Whereas, These verbal agreements in the past 
with the officials of the institutions have led 
to a distrust of verbal agreements that can 
be changed at the will of any official, and 

Whereas, There is considerable doubt 
amongst the unionized employees that the offi- 
cials of the department of mental health are 
acting in good faith with them in eliminating 
such conditions as prevent employees being 
permanent, competent, efficient and satisfactory 
to the best interests of the patients and the 
commonwealth, and 

Whereas, Special committees and investiga- 
tors have found it necessary to report favorably 
on improvements in wages and conditions for 
the officials of the institutions, as evidenced by 
the report of Paul Cabot and George Greenough, 
special investigators who recently recommended 
$85,000 increase for the stewards of the institu- 
tions and more liberal housing allowance for 
them that they may lead more normal lives, and 
Whereas, These committees and investigators 
and the members of the Legislature have found 
it sound, sensible economy to report nothing 
favorable for the common worker in the insti- 
tution who receives $10.35 per week and to 
turn down all pieces of legislation to better the 
conditions of the lowly employee of the depart- 
ment of mental health; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates assembled in the 
54th convention of the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor unanimously record themselves 
in protest of existing labor conditions in the 
several institutions of the state department of 
mental health, and be it further 

Resolved, That the state department of ad- 
ministration and finance revise its ratings of 
employees and increase the number of posi- 
tions necessary to conduct the institutions m a 
proper manner, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Governor of the common- 
wealth be requested to appoint a committee that 
will include a member of Organized Labor to 
investigate the laws, rules and regulations gov- 
erning the employees of the state department 
of mental health, and be it further 

Resolved, That the findings and recommenda- 
tions of this committee be acted upon and ac- 
cepted by the officials of the department of 
mental health in the best interests of the em- 
ployee and the commonwealth and that such 
necessary changes in the laws be recommended 
by the Governor of the commonwealth, Commis- 
sioner of Mental Health and the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor at the next session 
of the Legislature, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor, in convention, unanimously 
endorses the efforts of Local No. 174 at Dan- 
vers in their effort to better the wages and con- 
ditions of the employees of the state department 
of mental health, and be it further 



Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the 'Governor of the commonwealth, the 
Commissioner of Mental Health and the several 
superintendents. 

ALBERT H. BUCKLEY, Building Service 
Employees No. 174, Danvers 

The committee recommended that the 
resolution be amended by striking out 
the words "the organized employees in 
the Building Service Employees Interna- 
tional Union" and inserting the words 
"Organized Labor." 

Delegate Russell moved that the reso- 
lution, as amended by the committee, be 
adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 23 

GOLD STANDARD AND REGULATION 
OF THE DOLLAR 

Whereas, It is known that certain large 
corporations are doing all in their power to 
commit farm and labor organizations to de- 
mand a return to the gold standard as being 
the necessary prelude to real recovery, and 

Whereas, This premise is entirely false and 
misleading as there never has been a time 
in the history of "gold as money" where 
this alleged quality or power has been demon- 
strated because gold as a commodity is 
scarce and the ups and downs of its pro- 
duction prove its unworthiness as a standard 
of value and useless as to the quantity re- 
quired in a progressive civilization such as 
ours, and 

Whereas, Most of the great nations, in- 
cluding Great Britain, have been off the gold 
standard since September of 1933, clear proof 
at last that the great nations recognize its 
worthlessness as a true standard of value, 
and 

Whereas, The gold standard manipulators 
are anxious to get our large stores of gold 
which are buried in our Kentucky vaults 
into circulation again, so that they may once 
more get a strangle-hold on the rnoney and 
credit of this and other nations foolish enough 
to listen to them ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we ask our President and 
Congress not to issue any order involving 
a return to the gold standard, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That we ask our President and 
Congress to return the power to Congress 
to issue and regulate the value of money 
to the end that a stable or managed cur- 
rency may be created a necessity to business 
revival. 

THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 

The committee recommended non-con- 
currence without prejudice. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 58 

DEMAND RESIGNATION OF PATRICK 

"PACKY" SULLIVAN FROM STATE 

LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION 

Whereas, Organized Labor fought bitterly 
and hard for many years to obtain a statutory 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



83 



guarantee of the right of workers to bargain 
collectively and to be free from discrimination 
for union activity, and 

Whereas, After many years of struggle, such 
legislation was obtained in Massachusetts for 
intrastate industries through the passage in 
1937 of the Baby Wlagner Law, and 

Whereas, The guarantees of that law are 
only as strong as the force which administers 
them, and in the hands of unfair or prejudiced 
administration are rendered non-existent, and 

Whereas, One of the members of our State 
Labor Relations Commission, administering the 
Baby Wagner Law, is a so-called member of 
organized labor, one Patrick ("Packy") Sul- 
livan, who has shown himself to be, through 
lack of a fair perspective and an unbiased 
viewpoint, unfit for the position he holds, and 

Whereas, The efforts of the other two com- 
missioners who try to be fair are not always 
availing against the dilatory pro-employer 
tactics of the said "Packy" Sullivan, and 

Whereas, Therefore, the rights supposedly 
guaranteed by the Baby Wagner Law to 
workers in intrastate industries in Massachu- 
setts are made a mockery; therefore, be it 

Resolved by this fifty-fourth annual conven- 
tion of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor that we demand the resignation of that 
so-called member of Organized Labor known as 
Patrick ("Packy") Sullivan from the State 
Labor Relations Commission in the interest of 
justice and for the good of the labor move- 
ment. 

ROBERT H. EVERITT, Building Service 
Employees No. 30, Boston 

THOMAS J. LOUGHRAN, Building Serv- 
ice Employees No. 175, Boston 

FRANCIS NANGLE, Building Service 
Employees No. 124, Boston 

JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 
Cooks No. 186, Boston 

DAVID F. LOONEY, Firemen and Oilers 
No. 3, Boston 

The committee recommended non-con- 
currence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Hamlin (Meat Cutters No. 
618, Boston) rose to a point of informa- 
tion arid asked whether the recom- 
mendation of the committee indicated 
that the convention concurred with the 
action of Mr. Sullivan as a member of 
the Labor Relations Commission. 



Delegate Russell replied, as follows: 

We have attempted to avoid the damnation 
of anyone in public office without their record 
before us. We understand there are other 
moves afoot that are going to take care of this 
particular situation. Our other reason was 
that the man in question was being condemned 
without an opportunity to be heard and while we 
might feel that there is justification for this 
resolution, we might be condemning one mem- 
ber when all three should be tarred with the 
same feather. 

The motion was then adopted. 



RRS(Jl,UTrON NO. 84 

REDISTRICTING of SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT AFFECTING WARD :•„ 

SPRINGFIELD 

Whereas, It has been proposed to redis- 
trict a State Senatorial District so that 
Ward 3 of Springfield will he shifted to the 
Berkshire-Hampshire-Hampden District in- 
stead of keeping it in the First Hampden Dis- 
trict where it rightfully belongs, and 

Whereas 90 per cent of the voters of Ward 
3 of Springfield are working men and women, 
and 

Whereas, These voters would not he ade- 
quately represented in the proposed shift of 
this ward to a "foreign" district, economic 
and legislative needs of working men and 
women in a city ward are entirely different 
from those of smaller towns and districts and 
such redistricting would be "fatal" to these 
voters, and 

Whereas, Labor sees the black hand of 
the present Republican administration con- 
niving to gerrymander Ward 3 of Spring- 
field and prevent Labor from electing an- 
other Senator. Labor in this district well 
remembers the "bad" records of three Re- 
publican Senators ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor go 
on record as opposed to the suggested shift 
of the voting area of Ward 3 of Springfield ; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That the delegates immediately 
contact their Senators and Representatives 
at Beacon Hill and vigorously oppose the re- 
districting of Ward 3 of Springfield. 

CHARLES E. CAFFREY, Springfield 

Central Labor Union 
EUGENE PASINI, Bakery Workers No. 

32, Springfield. 
HARRY P. HOGAN, Springfield Central 

Labor Union 
JAMES J. HALLORAN, Bartenders 

No. 67, Springfield 
MARION MACEY, Waitresses No. 83, 

Springfield 
JOHN DAHNER, Bartenders No. 67. 
Springfield 

The committee recommended con- 
currence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 86 

FIRMS RECOMMENDED BY OFFICE 
EQUIPMENT MECHANICS 

Whereas, Lodge No. 1373, Office Equip- 
ment Mechanics, being affiliated with the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor and 
the Boston Central Labor Union ; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the Underwood Elliott 
Fisher Company and L. C. Smith and Corona 
Typewriter Company be considered when 
purchasing typewriters and adding machines, 
ribbons, et cetra, and that these sarne com- 
panies be considered whenever possible re- 
garding the maintenance of typewriters and 
adding machines. 

JOHN L. DWYER, Office Equipment 
Mechanics No. 1373, Boston 

The committee recommended con- 
currence. 



84 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 25 
ESTABLISHMENT OF A LABOR PARTY 

Whereas, It appears that Labor has failed 
to oppose the 3% law which effectually puts 
off the ballot all minority or independent 
voter groups, and 

Whereas, This is a serious infringement 
of our liberties under the constitution, and 

Whereas, Labor, which has always stood 
for independent political action and has often 
in its able career taken such action, will be 
the chief sufferer in the future if this cruel 
conspiracy of both parties remains unchal- 
lenged ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That Labor put a ticket in the 
field to win back this right for all the people 
of Massachusetts and such ticket shall not 
include any member of either party chosen 
to run for public office, and be it further 

Resolved, That a committee of 10, in ad- 
dition to the state Executive Council, be 
chosen to run the campaign, said committee 
to have a majority of independent voters 
on it. 

THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 

The committee recommended non-con- 
currence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Burt (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) stated that Governor Saltonstall 
had approved the bill, which virtually 
eliminated minority parties from hav- 
ing a place on the ballot. He said 
that the new law would affect the 
Socialist Party, Socialist Labor Party, 
Townsendites and others. He hoped the 
report of the conservative and ultra- 
reactionary Committee on Resolutions 
would not be adopted. 

After the voice vote was doubted, the 
motion was adopted by a standing vote, 
180-19. 

RESOLUTION NO. 65 

DISAPPROVAL OF BATA SHOE 
COMPANY 

Whereas, The Bata Shoe Company of 
Czecho- Slovakia is at present erecting a factory 
in the state of Maryland for the purpose of 
manufacturing shoes which is being constructed 
totally without union help, and 

Whereas, The Baltimore Federation of Labor 
has already condemned the firm for this reason 
and has petitioned its sister unions for aid or 
support, and 

Whereas, The Canadian Trades Congress, an 
affiliate of the American Federation of Labor 
has taken similar action against this firm in 
their country, and 

Whereas, The firm decided upon the erection 
of these plants only after the United States 
government was forced to abrogate its trade 



treaty with Czecho-SIovakia upon its seizure 
by Germany, and 

Whereas, This nation will shortly be flooded 
with products of this firm made under non- 
union, cheap labor conditions to the detriment 
of the industry and consequent disturbance of 
conditions enjoyed by members of Organized 
Labor employed in the industry; therefore, be 
it 

Resolved, That the delegates hereby condemn 
the Bata Shoe firm of Czecho-SIovakia, place 
said firm on its unfair list and notify all of 
its locals to that effect. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006. Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 244, 

Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel & 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 383, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerk's 

No. 366, Lawrence 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Hands No. Ill, 

Lawrence 

The committee recommended con- 
currence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Russell then reported on 
Resolutions 16, 20, 21, 26, 40, 63, 64, 70 
and 71. 



RESOLUTION NO. 16 
PAYROLL TAX 

Whereas, The present state Legislature is 
groping about in an effort to find an ade- 
quate tax program to raise additional revenue 
to relieve the cities and towiis of this com- 
monwealth from excessive relief burdens un- 
der the guise of actually relieving the small 
property owner, and 

Whereas, In their search for such a pro- 
gram it has been made apparent by certain 
prominent members of the labor movement 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



85 



that a one per cent pay roll tax on the 
workers is the solution to their immediate 
problem and which proposal led to the filing 
of a bill in the Massachusetts Senate by 
a senator who has always been deemed a 
friend of Labor, calling for a two per cent 
pay roll tax on the workers of this com- 
monwealth, thereby creating the illusion that 
Organized Labor favors such a proposal, and 

Whereas, The recent stand of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor on the re- 
tail sales tax proposal has been one of de- 
cided opposition, which clearly shows and 
defines Labor's attitude in this state as re- 
gards any type of taxation which would tend 
to burden the vast army of workers and 
should be a conclusive answer to any similar 
proposal such as a pay roll tax, and 

Whereas, Such a tax would work an ex- 
treme hardship on the workers in that it 
would in reality mean a two per cent reduc- 
tion in their wages, and thereby of necessity 
reduce the purchasing power of all workers 
by two per cent at a time when all our ef- 
forts are bent to increase that same pur- 
chasing power, and 

Whereas, Other forms of legislation have 
been submitted by Organized Labor to al- 
leviate the tax burdens of real estate and 
have met with ignominious defeat, among 
them the Federation bill calling for the es- 
tablishment of a state lottery ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor, assembled at its 54th 
annual convention, go on record as unani- 
mously opposed to any type of pay roll tax 
on the workers of this commonwealth, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor will oppose any single 
unit of its affiliate unions who subscribe to 
any pay roll tax proposal. 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters 

No. Ill, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers 

No. 686, Lawrence 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 

477, Lawrence 
JOHN A. FUSCO, Building Laborers 

No. 175, Lawrence 
JOHN V. JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 

119, Lawrence 
JAMES H. SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 

90, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen 

No. 261, Lawrence 

RESOLUTION NO. 20 

ABOLITION OF PRIVATE CONTROL 
OF NATION'S CREDIT 

Whereas, President Roosevelt with the best 
intentions has not succeeded according to his 
deserts, and 

Whereas, This has been due primarily to an 
unstable monetary condition in our financial 
set-up, viz., the Federal Reserve Bank, a pri- 
vately controlled concern which works in the 
interest of Wall street and the international 
money changers, as against the interests of all 
the people, and 

Whereas, There is in the House, a Bill, H. R. 
4931, which proposes to abolish this private 
control of the nation's credit and place same 
back in the Congress of the United States, 
where it belongs constitutionally; therefore, be 
it 



Resolved, That wc urge our congressmen and 
senators to support and work for H. R. 4931, 
and he it further 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be 
sent to our state representatives. President 
Roosevelt, Congressman Jerry Voorhis, and 
Senator Wagner. 

THOMAS BURKE, Teamsters No. 25, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 

RESOLUTION NO. 21 
TWO PER CENT GROSS INCOME TAX 

Whereas, The state of Massachusetts, through 
its growing welfare burden, is being held back 
from recovery through its antiquated taxation 
procedure which at this time is pressing un- 
duly upon real estate, and 

Whereas, The state of Indiana, in 1932, 
under the able leadership of Ex-Gov. Paul V. 
McNutt persuaded business and industry and 
labor that a gross income tax would speedily 
rebuild the state, and 

Whereas, The state of Indiana's gross in- 
come tax report of 1938 shows that the state 
property tax levy was 58% less than in 1932, 
no schools have been closed, many additional 
services rendered and the state taken out of the 
red to the tune of 25 millions; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we recommend to the General 
Court of Massachusetts the adoption as our 
emergency measure for welfare and old age 
pensions of a tax of 2% upon gross income 
in excess of $500 per year accruing within 
the state to any taxpayer (whether resident or 
non-resident) and exempting retail merchants 
up to $2,000 per year on gross income, and %% 
on wholesalers, agriculture and manufacturers. 
THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 



RESOLUTION NO. 26 

TWO PER CENT UNIVERSAL INCOME 
TAX 

Whereas, the state of Massachusetts is 
faced with a very grave emergency • because 
of continued unemployment, and 

Whereas, This adds so tremendously to 
the relief burden of the towns and cities of 
the state that new ways must be found to 
raise additional revenue, and 

Whereas, Real estate taxation, especially 
that of the small house owner, has become 
so burdensome that foreclosures are numer- 
ous and building and realty operations are at 
a standstill; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the General Court of Mas- 
sachusetts be asked to draw a bill asking 
for a 2% universal income tax exempting 
incomes at $400 and under, revenue to be 
solely for general welfare, and be it further 

Resolved, That the State Federation of 
Labor, in convention assembled, be asked to 
endorse this move. 

THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379," Boston 

RESOLUTION NO. 40 
GENERAL WELFARE ACT 

Whereas, It is conceded by everyone that, 
although the Social Security Act was a big 



86 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



step in the right direction, the matter of old- 
age pensions and social security is in utmost 
confusion throughout the nation, with 3,070 
county systems of old-age relief, 48 state 
systems and an expensive, cumbersome, fed- 
eral system which requires keeping track of 
the weekly wages of 42,500,000 employees 
and which results in inequality between the 
people of the various states under the "match- 
ing system" now in force, as well as dis- 
crimination against over one half of our popu- 
lation, in that social security is denied the 
farmer, the farm laborer, domestics, house- 
wives, businessmen, professional men, and 
the unemployed, and 

Whereas, The present federal system takes 
almost a billion dollars a year out of pur- 
chasing power, out of the payrolls of America 
— without an equivalent return to the workers 
and employers paying the payroll tax, which 
is scheduled to go up to 6%, plus a payroll 
tax of around 3% for unemployment insur- 
ance, which will make a total payroll tax of 
9%, much of which is to be used for the 
ordinary running expense of the government, 
which was not contemplated when the Social 
Security Act was originally passed, and 

Whereas, On a "pay-as-you-go" basis by 
which the money collected for old-age pen- 
sions is immediately disbursed to the old 
people the very next month, less the cost 
of administration, the merchant, manufactur- 
ers and farmers will benefit immediately 
from the far greater purchasing power on 
the part of the general public, and Labor will 
have full opportunity for employment in 
private industry to manufacture the things 
the old people will need and be able to buy 
if they are given adequate annuity now, and 

Whereas, It is our belief that reasonable 
social security should be given to all citizens 
of the United States at the age of 60, not 
just to certain groups and certain classes ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this organized body go on 
record as approving the principles of the 
improved General Welfare Act which made 
such remarkable headway in the 75th Con- 
gress after it was _ modified and made rea- 
sonable by a series of amendments, and 
which has been introduced in the 76th Con- 
gress as H. R. 5620 by Congressman Warren 
G. Magnuson (D) of Washington, the basic 
principle of H. R. 5620 will amend the Social 
Security Act to give all unemployed citizens 
over 60 an honorable federal annuity of $30 
to $60 per month, financed by a 2% gross 
income tax on "ailed values", and be it fur- 
ther 

Resolved, That this organized body peti- 
tion the congressmen of Massachusetts, to 
sign, petition (No. 15) on the speakers desk 
to release H. R. 5620 on the floor for de- 
bate, and memoralize the 76th Congress to 
pass this measure, and that copies of this 
resolution be mailed to secretary of the 
Senate, clerk of the House, the United States 
senators from this state and each of state's 
representatives in the House of Representa- 
tives, to the General Welfare Federation of 
America, Inc., 945 Pennsylvania Ave., N. W., 
Washington, D. C, and secretary of the 
Eastern Massachusetts State Council, 11 
Delano Park, Roslindale, Mass. 

WILLIAM BARRY, Carpenters No. 51, 
Boston 

EDWARD I. KELLEY, Elevator Con- 
structors No. 4, Boston 

FRANCIS O'TOOLE, Plasterers No. 10, 
Boston 

FRANK J. THORNE, Carpenters No. 
51, Boston 

WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS, Ironwork- 
ers No. 7, Boston 



RESOLUTION NO. 63 
TAX ON INTEREST FROM MORTGAGES 

Whereas, The subject of taxation and the 
various proposals offered to meet the cost 
of government are of paramount and vital 
importance to the wage-earners of this com- 
monwealth, and 

Whereas, Many of the proposals so far 
offered places the burden on the pay envel- 
opes of the wage-earning group, who already 
are heavily taxed through direct and indi- 
rect taxation ; and 

Whereas, The interest money received by 
banks and other agencies from owners of 
property as interest on mortgages is a source 
of revenue which has never been tapped, and 

Whereas, Before the depression years the 
banks received on mortgages 6% and paid 
their depositors 4% or 4%% and today they 
receive, as a rule, 5^^% and only pay their 
depositors 2%%, which means that today 
they are working on a margin of 3% net i)rofit 
instead of 1%% or 2% in pre-depression 
years, and 

Whereas, That at the present time the 
law provides that banks must pay taxes on 
interest money loaned out for business pur- 
poses and not on mortgages, and 

Whereas, It is estimated there are between 
$2,500,000,000 to $3,000,000,000 loaned out 
on real estate mortgages in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts by banks and other 
agencies on which no tax on interest is 
paid and which, if taxed, would bring in a 
revenue estimated between $25,000,000 to 
$50,000,000; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor, in meeting assembled, go on record 
in favor of taxing the interest money received 
by banks and other agencies from owners of 
property as interest on mortgages and that 
the Secretary-Treasurer be instructed to file 
a bill in the Legislature to this effect. 

J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographi- 
cal No. 13, Boston 



RESOLUTION NO. 64 
RETAIL SALES TAX 

Whereas, The proposal for a retail sales 
tax has been advanced in the Legislature 
and has not yet been finally defeated, and 

Whereas, This legislation if enacted would 
be contrary to accepted principles of taxa- 
tion in that it would work unequally upon 
those least able to pay, and 

Whereas, The monies which would be so 
raised for relief purposes would in them- 
selves be subject to a sales levy when ex- 
pended and thus become a tax upon a tax, 
and 

Whereas, The inequality of this form of 
taxation forces the poor to support the poorer, 
and is in reality a tax on necessities and 
comes most out of the pockets of those 
who live closest to the necessity level ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates hereby con- 
demn this form of taxation and resolve to 
carry on the fight against its enactment with 
undiminished fervor so that our present ef- 
forts in defeating its enactment shall not 
have been in vain. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen 

No. 261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers 

No. 686, Lawrence 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



87 



JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 

110, Lawrence 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

111, Lawrence 

JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters 

No. 551, Lawrence 



RESOLUTION NO. 70 
TAX ON CHAIN STORES 

Whereas, Nearly half the states have 
enacted legislation imposing penalties upon 
chain stores in the form of taxes, and 

Whereas, The history of such taxes makes 
it plain that whatever other arguments have 
been advanced to justify them, their main 
purpose is to tax the chains out of existence, 
and 

Whereas, The argument that the chain 
store has a competitive advantage over the 
independent store is no reason why we as 
consumers should be deprived of the benefits 
of efficiency and administrative ingenuity, and 

Whereas, Large department stores enjoy 
the same advantages as chains but have not 
Iseen taxed for their efficiency, thereby dis- 
closing inequalities in this type of legislation, 
and 

Whereas, The definite suspicion having thus 
been created that this legislation is directed 
not so much against such efficiency but 
rather against its "foreign" competition, and 

Whereas, This tax either becomes a part 
of the selling price or these units do not 
operate and the consumer is entirely at the 
hands of the local retailer and denies to 
the consumer the benefits of organization, and 

Whereas, Genius and the net result is to 
keep prices high and to produce very little 
tax income ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we condemn chain store 
taxation and do all within our power to pre- 
vent this type of legislation from becoming 
a part of the tax structure within our state. 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

Lawrence 
JOHN FUSCO, Building Laborers No. 

175, Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 
No. 326, Lawrence 

HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 
Workers No. B1006, Lawrence 

WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 
244, Lawrence 

LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No, 
51, Lawrence 

FRANKLIN J. MURPlHY, Hotel & 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 



DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 

No. 366, Lawrence 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 

Ill, Lawrence 



RESOLUTION NO. 71 
STUDY OF PROBLEM OF TAXATION 

Whereas, Taxation is a matter which vitally 
concerns each and every citizen in his per- 
sonal life, and 

Whereas, Taxation has an equally impor- 
tant effect upon the operations of our vari- 
ous forms of government, and 

Whereas, Taxation has a vital relation to 
the welfare of trade and commerce, business 
and industry of all types and kinds, and 

Whereas, Taxation is of such a nature 
that it is used not only to produce revenue 
but as often as not to enforce and influence 
policy, and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Branch 
of the American Federation of Labor has 
never been in a position to adopt a con- 
sistent program on the subject of taxation 
but rather has followed the negative pro- 
cedure of belatedly looking into the proposals 
of annually advanced upon many fronts by 
individuals and groups not usually holding 
the same economic views as those of labor 
organizations, and the everyday working man, 
and 

Whereas, The matter of taxation will have 
an increasingly important effect upon the 
welfare of the average citizen and the mem- 
bers of organized labor, and is of such an 
involved and complicated nature as to re- 
quire a comprehensive and complete examina- 
tion of the whole tax structure ; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That the delegates to this the 
54th annual convention of the Massachusetts 
Federation of Labor hereby authorize and 
instruct the Executive Council of aforesaid 
body to undertake an exhaustive study of 
the tax problem and its relation to the 
welfare of the members of organized labor ; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That the convention further 
authorize the Executive Council to employ 
such informed authorities and agencies as it 
may deem necessary to accomplish this true 
objective; and be it further 

Resolved, That the conveiition hereby 
authorize the Executive Council to expend 
such sums as it may find necessary in ful- 
filling the purposes of this resolution ; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the convention authorize 
the Executive Council to draft such legisla- 
tion as will consistently favor the position 
and policy of Organized Labor to be sub- 
mitted to the next session of the Massachu- 
setts Legislature if need for such is clearly 
shown by the results of aforesaid study ; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be 
instructed to give a full and complete re- 
port of its findings to the next annual con- 
vention of this organization, and be it fur- 
ther 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be 
instructed to prepare, and publish upon the 
completion of this study a printed report of 
its findings in such number as it may deem 
advisable ; and be it further 

Resolved, That the convention authorize 
the Executive Council to expend such sums 
for the publication of this report as may 
be necessary. 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

Lawrence 
JOHN FUSCO, Building Laborers No. 

175, Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006, Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 

244, Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel & 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 

No. 366, Lawrence 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 

Ill, Lawrence 

Delegate Russell spoke on the resolu- 
tions, as follows: 

Each of these resolutions are definitely as- 
sociated with the subject of taxes. While your 
Committee on Resolutions appreciated that they 
have all the knowledge and information that 
could possibly be condensed into any group of 
10 men, we feel a bit modest when it comes 
to the question of taxation. There are more 
resolutions, if you have time to read them, 
telling how to cure all our ills and how to over- 
come these things. Your committee, in its 
modesty, recommends as a substitute for all of 
the resolutions, the following resolution which 
is composed of part of Resolution No. 71. 

RESOLUTION NO. 89 
STUDY OF PROBLEM OF TAXATION 

Whereas, Taxation is a matter which vitally 
concerns each and every citizen in his personal 
life, and 

Whereas, Taxatio.n has an equally important 
effect upon the operations of our various forms 
of government, and 

Whereas, Taxation has a vital relation to the 
welfare of trade and commerce, business and 
industry of all types and kinds, and 

Whereas, Taxation is of such a nature that 
it is used not only to produce revenue^ but as 
often as not to enforce and influence policy, 
and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor has never been in a position to 
adopt a consistent program on the subject of 
taxation but rather has followed the negative 



procedure of belatedly looking into the proposals 
annually advanced upon many fronts by in- 
dividuals and groups not usually holding the 
same economic views as those of labor organi- 
zations, and the everyday working man, and 

Whereas, The matter of taxation will have 
an increasingly important effect upon the wel- 
fare of the average citizen and the members of 
organized labor, and is of such an involved 
and complicated nature as to require a com- 
prehensive and complete examination of the 
whole tax structure; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates to this the 54th 
annual convention of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor hereby authorize and in- 
struct the Executive Council to undertake an 
exhaustive study of the tax problem and its 
relation to the welfare of the members of 
organized labor; and be it further 

Resolved, That the convention authorize the 
Executive Council to draft such legislation as 
will consistently favor the position and policy 
of organized labor to be submitted to the next 
session of the Massachusetts Legislature if 
need for such is clearly shown by the results 
of aforesaid study; and be it further 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be 
instructed to give a full and complete report 
of its findings to the next annual convention 
of this organization; and be it further 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be 
instructed to prepare and publish upon the com- 
pletion of this study a printed report of its 
findings in such number as it may deem ad- 
visable; and be it further 

Resolved: That the Executive Council be 
empowered to appoint a. committee of five mem- 
bers affiliated with the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor who shall act as an ad- 
visory committee to the Executive Council and 
that the Executive Council be_ empowered _ to 
call a conference on the question of taxation 
if in their judgment it becomes necessary, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be em- 
powered to expend not more than $100 for the 
purpose of completing this study, and in ad- 
dition, the Executive Council may pay the 
small expense of the committee members. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) stated 
that such a resolution had been passed 
before without any appropriation and 
that a committee had been appointed 
but never came to life. He spoke of 
the activities of the Boston Central 
Labor Union with reference to the mat- 
ter of the 10-point program of the Gov- 
ernor which included a two-cent tax on 
cigarettes as well as an additional tax 
on liquor, electrical energy and a de- 
creased exemption under the state in- 
come tax law — five new taxes affecting 
everyone. He also spoke of how import- 
ant and vital the tax problem was to 
workers and said that Labor pays for 
everything, not only hidden taxes, but 
the forthcoming taxes which they will 
be forced to pay. 

Delegate Doherty (Stereotypers No. 
2, Boston) rose to a point of order, 
stating that Delegate Kearney had 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



89 



talked longer than the rules of the con- 
vention allowed. 

President Morrissey ruled that the 
point of order was well taken. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) moved that the rules be 
suspended and that Delegate Kearney's 
time be extended. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Kearney continued, stating 
that the problem should be studied 
carefully for the protection of the poor 
man who actually carries the burden of 
taxation and the Federation should try 
to design some program to release 
workers from further loss of dollars 
from their pay envelopes because of 
taxes. If the Governor's program were 
to go through, he said, it would cost 
the average man about $60 per year in 
additional taxes. He felt that some- 
thing ought to be done to stop the con- 
stant picking at those who receive small 
wages and that a system should be 
started which could be called a tax 
against taxes. He said that the Boston 
Central Labor Union had suggested 
that the Governor withdraw his 10-point 
tax program and accept a payroll tax 
which was proposed by the Boston Cen- 
tral Labor Union, so that the man who 
gets $20 would contribute 20c per week, 
and no more. He stated that the Gover- 
nor's program would raise $35,000,000 
while the proposal of the Central Labor 
Union would bring in $55,000,000. He 
felt that the State Federation had not 
given the tax subject much considera- 
tion before, although the responsibility 
for such tax burdens was on the 
shoulders of the representatives of 
Labor and that Labor had always taken 
the easiest way out. He stated that in 
the city of Boston 16,000 homes were 
to be auctioned by the tax collector, 
some of which were homes of members 
of Labor. He concluded by saying that 
something should be done to save the 
homes of wanre earners in every indus- 
trial city and felt the problem should' 
be considered very seriously. 

Delegate Moriarty, Typographical No. 
13, Boston) agreed with Delegate 
Kearney that the tax problem was one 
of the biggest problems of the Labor 
Movement and felt it was a healthy 
sign when so many resolutions were in- 
troduced on the subject. He said there 
were so-called tax experts who were 
trying to offer solutions but were actu- 



ally protecting certain groups in the 
community from being taxed and cited 
the Taxpayers Association and its ac- 
tivities which was opposed to Labor in 
every way. He spoke of the Equal Tax 
League which submitted bills to the 
Legislature to tax intangibles which 
was amended and changed to a point 
of uselessness. He called attention to 
the fact interest on money loaned for 
business purposes was taxable, but in- 
terest on money loaned on mortgages 
was not taxable and told of banks re- 
ceiving 6 per cent on mortgages before 
the depression and paying but iVz per 
cent on deposits but have now reduced 
the interest charge to 5 per cent and 
the dividend to depositors to 2% per 
cent, pointing out that banks must be 
making more money now than ever 
before. He felt Labor was right in 
looking into the tax matter and said he 
favored the proposition recommended 
by the Resolutions Committee. 

Delegate Carroll (Cement Finishers 
No. 534, Boston) stated he had pre- 
sented resolutions on the tax matter in 
past years but the Federation had not 
taken any serious action and said he 
waj glad it had been introduced as it 
was a very important problem. He said 
that he had studied this problem and 
that a committee had been appointed at 
one time to study the problem but that 
he and George Gibbs were the only 
members who attended meetings. He 
stated that he favored having the Execu- 
tive Council make a thorough and hon- 
est-to-goodness examination of the tax- 
ation problem. 

Delegate Lansing (Newspaper Press- 
men No. 3, Boston) desired to record 
himself and his union as strongly op- 
posed to the misleading and evasive re- 
marks of Delegate Kearney. He spoke 
of the Boston Central Labor Union's 
tax proposal and said that his organi- 
zation and the teachers' union had dared 
to stand up and be counted against the 
1 per cent payroll tax. He felt that the 
statement of Delegate Kearney urging 
a tax against taxes was foolishness but 
felt it would be well to place the mat- 
ter in the hands of a committee, but 
also felt that if the activities and rec- 
ommendations of the committee of the 
Boston Central Labor Union was a cri- 
terion there would be a lot of explain- 
ing to do when the delegates returned 
to their local unions. 

Delegate Meehan (Painters No. 44, 
Lawrence) felt that the Federation 



90 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



should go on record as unalterably op- 
posed to tax groups which would put 
their fingers deeper into the pay en- 
velopes of workers. He said that the 
delegates had not foreseen the passage 
of the Social Security Act or the Un- 
employment Compensation Act and had 
voted in favor of the employee tax con- 
trary to action of the American Feder- 
ation of Labor, although he had been 
against employee contributions. The 
tax, he stated, created about $16,000,000 
in one and one-half years but had 
finally abolished the contributions 
made by employees. He told of a tax 
commission appointed by the Legisla- 
ture on which he had served and said 
that although experts were engaged and 
an exhaustive study made, the problem 
was more confusing than before the 
study began. He said that the problem 
was a difficult one and that the dele- 
gates were not equipped to discuss the 
subject with authority, but thought a 
committee should be appointed to study 
the matter and suggested that such a 
committee study available legislative re- 
ports and gather other data which 
would be included in their report to the 
55th annual convention. He stressed 
the fact that Labor must oppose the 
tax groups seeking to shift the tax bur- 
den from themselves onto the wage 
earners. 

The motion was then adopted. 

The convention then adjourned until 
4:00 p. m. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

The convention was called to order 
Friday afternoon at 4:00 by President 
Morrissey. 

Secretary Taylor read the following 
communication: 

INTERNATIONAL MOLDERS' UNION 

NO. 5, WORCESTER, 

MASSACHUSETTS 

August 10, 1939. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th An- 
nual Convention of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor: 

Greetings: 

We read with regret the newspaper items 
which stated that the delegate from our local 
union (Molders' No. 5), William H. Thorn- 
ton, had been heckled, booed and hissed while 
speaking on a resolution that was before your 
body. As officers of one of the oldest trade 
unions in Massachusetts, we deplore the fact 
that delegates representing the trade union 



movement should forget the militant demand of 
Labor that the right of free speech be preserved 
and that they stooped to embarrass a real trade 
unionist, reports to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing. Mr. Thornton has been a member of 
the International Molders' Union for over 35 
years. He is not a Johnny-come-late trade 
unionist, but has carried the banner of Labor 
through many years when the going was 
tough. 

Brother Thornton has been our delegate to 
your conventions for over a quarter of a cen- 
tury and we never regretted our choice. His 
record for square dealing is known to us and to 
thousands of other men and women who toil 
for a living. 

We hold Brother Thornton in high esteem 
and wish to say to the delegates _ present at 
your convention that we have explicit confidence 
in the ability, honesty, and integrity of our 
delegate, William H. Thornton. 

With best wishes for a successful convention, 
we remain 

Fraternally yours, 

ALFRED DUMAS, President 

J. W. MARA, Corresponding Secretary 

EDWARD I. DECELLES, Recording 

Secretary." 



Secretary Taylor continued by reading 
the following telegram: 

Chicago, Illinois, August 10, 1939. 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Convention Hall, Bradford Hotel 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Greetings. Wish your organization con- 
tinued success. Sorry I could not attend. Re- 
gards to all the delegates. 

JOHN VAN VAERENEWYCK. 



Secretary Taylor read another tele- 
gram, as follows: 

Washington, D. C, August 11, 1939. 

Kenneth I. Taylor, Secretary 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
Bradford Hotel 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Am informed that the convention of the 
State Federation of Labor has under considera- 
tion resolution condemning the reciprocal trade 
agreements program. May 1 respectfully urge 
that action by the convention on any resolution 
of this character be deferred until adequate 
investigation can be made of effects of trade 
agreement policy on all domestic industry in- 
cluding those which manufacture for export 
markets. The vital interests of workers in 
those industries are surely entitled to careful 
consideration by your convention before pass- 
ing upon resolution opposing entire program of 
trade agreements. 

JOHN P. GREGG, Secretary, Committee 
for Reciprocity Information. 



Delegate Caffrey (Central Labor 
Union, Springfield) reported for the 
committee chosen to meet with Gov- 
ernor Saltonstall relative to the matter 
of withdrawing the state police from 
the strike area at South Barre, as fol- 
lows: 



Massachusetts State Fedekation of Labor 



91 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th An- 
nual Convention of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor : 

Regarding the strike at the mills of the 
Barre Wool Combing Company, your commit- 
tee recommends that the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor condemn the situation ex- 
isting there and the use of state police in a 
labor dispute. 

We further recommend that our Executive 
Council investigate the size of the personnel 
of the state police with the view of ascertain- 
ing if that department is not overmanned since 
30 state police officers can be detailed to duty 
in a labor dispute, presumably for the pro- 
tection of the employer. 

Also, because of the racial prejudices that 
have been created in the town of Barre by the 
selfish owner of the mills, who challenged the 
State Department of Labor by refusing to 
settle the labor controversy in a peaceful man- 
ner, we further recommend that the LaFollette 
Civil Liberties Committee be requested to in- 
vestigate the un-American and un-democratic 
living and working conditions of these mill 
workers. 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK, Team- 
sters No. 170, Worcester 

CHARLES E. CAFFREY, Central Labor 
Union, Springfield 

MAX HAMLIN, Meat Cutters No. 618, 
Boston 

FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 

JOHN M. SULLIVAN, Teamsters, No. 
25, Boston. 

Delegate Caffrey spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

I want to say that the Governor seemed to 
be in a receptive mood. We presented our 
problem to him and raised our voices in pro- 
test in accordance with the action of this con- 
vention. We informed him he had the dis- 
tinction of being the first Republican Gov- 
ernor to use state police in a labor dispute, and 
that the only other Governor was Joseph B. 
Ely. While the committee met with the Gov- 
ernor, the employer of the mill was in con- 
ference with James T. Moriarty, Commis- 
sioner of Labor, trying to bring about a settle- 
ment. Wte pressed the Governor for a decision 
as to whether he would remove the 30 state 
police in the town. 

We have a most disgraceful condition in 
South Barre. I say it is a little Harlan and 
one of the worst company-dominated communi- 
ties in the state. The company owns the mills, 
the homes, and if they can't afford their own 
police protection they go to other towns. The 
employer is the responsible party in this strike. 
He condemned the state board and refused to sit 
with them, and then we find that the state 
police were sent in to give him protection. The 
Governor contended he was protecting the 
strikers. I contended our strikers didn't ask 
for any protection. The Governor said he 
would reserve his decision until Wednesday of 
this week. I talked with Jim Moriarty and 
he said he thought there would be some de- 
cision today. But up to this time the Governor 
has made no reply. 

Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston) moved the report of 
the committee be approved. 

The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor read the provisions 



of the constitution having to do with 
the election of officers. 

President Morrissey then appointed 
the following tellers: 

Delegate Leonard, Street Carmen No. 261, 
Lawrence; Delegate Burke, Moving Picture 
Operators No. 182, Boston; Delegate Lansing, 
Newspaper Pressmen No. 3, Boston; Delegate 
Clayton, Machinists No. 264, Boston; and 
Delegate Carroll, Electrical Workers No. 103, 
Boston. 

Secretary Taylor called the roll. 

Vice-President Caffrey was called to 
the chair. 

Delegate Velleman, Chairman of the 
Committee on Officers' Reports, con- 
tinued his report for the committee: 

I would like to ask permission to supple- 
ment what was supposed to have been a report 
from the Committee on Officers' Reports. Un- 
fortunately the committee report failed to men- 
tion a question of great importance and that 
was the Connery Fund which was referred to 
that committee. You will note that in the 
printed report on Page 54 it gives an account- 
ing of the Connery Fund and asks the con- 
vention what to do with the money. The Ex- 
ecutive Council has given you two proposals 
to expend the money. There is $1895.92 in 
the hands of our Secretary-Treasurer. 

Delegate Velleman moved that the 
matter be referred to the incoming 
Executive Council with full power to ex- 
pend the amount in the fund. 

Secretary Taylor moved an appropri- 
ation be made from the Federation's 
treasury to supplement the William P. 
Connery, Jr., Memorial Fund in an 
amount to make the fund $2000. 

There being no objection, the amend- 
mend was made part of the original mo- 
tion. 

The motion was then adopted. 

Delegate Kearney (Hotel and Restau- 
rant Employees No. 34, Boston) called 
attention to the fact that Springfield, 
the convention city for 1940, had been 
omitted from the ballot, and moved that 
the Secretary cast a white ballot for 
Springfield as the convention city for 
1940. 

The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor complied by cast- 
ing a white ballot for Springfield as the 
convention city for 1940. 



Delegate Russell continued for the 
Committee on Resolutions, reporting on 
Resolutions Nos. 22, 66 and 74: 



92 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



RESOLUTION NO. 22 

EDUCATION — PUBLICATIONS 
DEPARTMENT 

Whereas, It is becoming more and more 
apparent that if we are to successfully give 
battle to those who would destroy us and our 
country's democratic institutions, we must en- 
large our activities; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That an education-publications de- 
partment be created with three specific instruc- 
tions until the presidential election is over : 

1. An intensive education drive throughout 
the membership on public questions such as ' 
new economic and political approach to mass 
production, technology, money and credit, 
banking, housing, labor solidarity in the po- 
litical as well as economic field, peace, foreign 
policy, economics for the workers, co-operation 
and co-operative movements, apprenticeship, 
training for labor leadership, economic need 
for old age pensions, taxation, social insurance, 
etc. 

2. Evolution of a labor program for all na- 
tional, state, county, city and town elections 
and participation of labor wherever possible in 
all such unit elections by questionnaires, or 
local candidates or state-wide action as Labor 
determines from time to time as local elections 
come up, and the state ticket, when due. 

3. The establishment of a 32-page weekly 
journal by Labor indirectly, supported by sub- 
scription from each member for one year at 
$1.20 per year (collected by local unions) but 
in addition to be floated by a temporary loan 
from unions or groups of individuals to the 
extent required for an efhcient and business- 
like starting of the paper which is absolutely 
necessary to carry out sections 1 and 2 and 
augment the field efforts of various locals and 
internationals and the New England organizer, 
and be it further 

Resolved, That the department be under one 
man with a board composed of one man for 
each division, corresponding to the national 
American Federation of Labor divisions, with 
the policy of the paper to be determined by the 
convention and controlled by the state Executive 
Council, the President and Secretary-Treasurer 
of the State Federation to be ex-officio members 
of the Divisional Board, each member of which 
must be chosen by each division. 

THOMAS BURKE, Central Labor Union, 

Boston 
JOHN J. Del MONTE, Teamsters No. 
379, Boston 

RESOLUTION NO. 66 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

Whereas, The educational facilities of the 
Massachusetts State College do not at pres- 
ent provide opportunities for the young people 
of our commonwealth to secure a complete train- 
ing in all the various branches of education, 
and 

Whereas, There exists at the present time 
several buildings and sites which may shortly 
be abandoned as teachers' training colleges, and 
which could be utilized for the purposes con- 
tained herein, and 

Whereas, A state university which had the 
facilities to equip individuals with a well- 
rounded education such as in existence in many 
other states would be a wonderful asset, and_ 

Whereas, The cost of attendance at a uni- 
versity of this nature would come more nearly 
within the means of the average citizen, and 

Whereas, The history of the labor movement 
contains a glorious record of the constant battle 
for the advancement of education and the 
achievement thereof; therefore, be it 



Resolved, That the delegates to the 54th con- 
vention of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor authorize and instruct its Executive 
Council to draft such legislation as may accom- 
plish the purposes of the resolution in provid- 
ing these facilities and submit same to the 
next session of the Legislature and to carry on 
such attendant work as may be necessary to 
secure the passage thereof. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY "H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

Lawrence 
JOHN FUSCO, Building Laborers No. 

175, Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

JOHN 'j. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006, Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 

244, Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel & 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 

No. 366, Lawrenc£ 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 

Ill, Lawrence 



RESOLUTION NO. 74 

RESEARCH AND STATISTICAL 
DEPARTMENT 

Whereas, The need for a comprehensive 
educational program among the members o£ 
Organized Labor has long been evident, and 

Whereas, A trained personnel available at 
a moment's notice at the call of both or- 
ganized and unorganized groups would be the 
greatest asset that the labor movement within 
the confines of the commonwealth could pos- 
sibly possess, and 

Whereas, Existing agencies for the dissem- 
ination of information on matters fundamental 
to the welfare of working men and women 
have for some time to fulfill these purposes 
in commendable fashion but in no wise have 
covered the situation to the necessary extent, 
and 

Whereas, The lack of an agency which 
the members of Organized Labor can refer 
for information on public issues and the 
many details necessary to the functioning of 
an efficient local union, results many times 
in the failure to achieve the best results 
from the various situations in which members 
of trade unions continually find themselves, 
and 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



U'.', 



Whereas, While this type of work is also 
carried on by and is the true responsibility 
of the international unions affiliated to the 
A. F. of L., the purpose of this resolution 
is to supplement and provide the information 
of a local nature which is not readily avail- 
able through national agencies, and 

Whereas, There is an abundance of source 
material compiled by private and govern- 
mental agencies of which there is a general 
lack of knowledge ; therefore, he it 

Resolved, That the assembled delegates at 
this, the 54th annual convention of the Mas- 
sachusetts State Federation of Labor, hereby 
authorize and instruct the Executive Council 
to establish a bureau to be designated as 
the "Research and Statistical Department" 
whose purpose shall be to gather and com- 
pile information on public policies affecting 
Organized Labor, also on the fundamental 
principles and practices of the labor move- 
ment, statistics of economic and social con- 
sequence which shall be made available to 
affiliated locals and the individual members 
thereof, and be it further 

Resolved, That the convention hereby 
authorize the Executive Council to expend 
a sum not exceeding $1,000 to carry out 
the purposes of this resolution, the total of 
such monies or any part thereof, which may 
he used in the interim preceding the next 
annual convention, and be it further 

Resolved, That the Executive Council be 
instructed to report in detail to the next 
annual convention the results of its activi- 
ties in these matters, and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution is not to 
be construed as a criticism of any existing 
agency or agencies whatsoever but rather 
that we hereby indorse the good work of 
these groups with a vote of thanks and that 
we continue to offer all possible co-operation 
in order that their good work may be con- 
tinued. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 115, 

Lawrence 
JOHN FUSCO, Building Laborers No. 

175, Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

156(i, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006. Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 

244, Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy. Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel & 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

Lawrence 
ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 
No. 366, Lawrence 



RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 
Ill, Lawrence 

The committee recommended that Res- 
olutions 22, 66 and 74 be referred to the 
incoming Executive Council. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 83 

ADEQUATE APPROPRIATIONS FOR 
ADMINISTRATION OF LABOR LAWS 

Whereas, The delegates to the 54th annual 
convention of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor during the present sessions 
liave complimented the Department of Labor 
and Industries and its entire personnel for 
the many services it has rendered the Trade 
Union Movement, and 

Whereas, Governor Leverett Saltonstall in 
his address Tuesday related to the delegates 
the great confidence he places in this same 
department, which we have reason to believe 
is a view generally held by government of- 
ficials, representatives of employers and the 
public, and 

Whereas, In order that the true purposes 
and objectives of this department may be 
carried out it is necessary that sufficient 
funds for its administration be provided, and 

Whereas, Unless such funds are provided, 
much legislation for which organized labor 
fought very hard will be rendered ineffective; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the delegates to the 54th 
annual convention of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor hereby authorize its 
President to appoint a committee to await 
upon Governor Saltonstall and carry to him 
instructions of the convention that such 
monies be appropriated in a supplemental 
budget as will be needed to fulfill the pur- 
poses of this resolution. 

JOHN F. \VADE, Lawrence Central 

Labor Union 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Lawrence 
Central Labor Union 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 72 

TWO-WEEK SUMMER TRADE UNION 
COLLEGE 

Whereas, It has been pointed out by 
Brother Watt that failure to solve our do- 
mestic problems constitute a challenge to 
our democratic form of government, and 

Whereas, Labor has not developed a satis- 
factory long-run program for dealing with 
unemployment, our most pressing social prob- 
lem, and 

Whereas, Now more than ever Labor needs 
a clear view and a united program in order 
to combat appeals to prejudice and unreason ; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That an educational department 
be. created in the State Federation of Labor, 
with the purpose of making available to the 



94 



Proceedings op the 54th Annual Convention 



rank and file of our membership competent 
instruction in present-day social problems 
from a Labor point of view ; and be it fur- 
ther 

Resolved, That this department be in- 
structed to investigate the possibility of a 
two-week residential trade-union college, to 
be financed by contributions from members 
and friends of the labor movement, to be 
held in Massachusetts some time during the 
coming summer, and that the department re- 
port its findings to the Executive Council 
not later than March, 1940. 

J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
ANTHONY DeANDRADE, Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers- and Press Clerks 
No. 21, Boston 
SAUL SWARTZMAN, Cafeteria Work- 
ers No. 480, Boston 
JOSEPH STEFANI, Pastry Cooks No. 

186, Boston 
HELEN SYMANSKI, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 
441, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 56 

RESTORATION OF EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Whereas, The figures of production show a 
constant, steady increase per worker over a 
period of years until an all-time peak was 
reached in 1936, and 

Whereas, These figures prove that less and 
less consideration is being given to the workers 
by the ever increasing demands for more and 
more production at reduced costs with an ever 
increasing cost to the consumer, and 

Whereas, A system has been growing 
whereby workers are being employed only at 
the convenience of industry, resulting in the 
loss of opportunity for employment and reduced 
wages due to part-time employment, which 
finally resulted in the "recession" of the past 
year, and 

Whereas, The failure of industry to provide 
employment has forced our government to pro- 
vide means whereby millions of the unem- 
ployed can secure the bare necessities of life, 
resulting in increased taxes; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the delegates to the 
fifty-fourth annual convention of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Labor, do hereby 
call upon industry to awaken to the fact that 
the constant drive to eliminate opportunity for 
employment can only result in destruction of 
industry itself through reduced purchasing 
power of the workers, and be it further 

Resolved, That we call on industry to restore 
opportunity for, and to provide employment 
for, those willing- and able to work. 

JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
GEORGE F. DOHERTY, Stereotypers 

No. 2, Boston 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Paper 
Handlers, Plate Boys and Press 
Clerks No. 21, Boston 



JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 176, 
Norwood 

EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 
Boston 

WALTER F. McLOUGHLIN, Press As- 
sistants No. 18, Boston 

THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo-En- 
gravers No. 3, Boston 

DANIEL E. DUANE, Central Labor 
Union, Norwood 

J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 
310, Lowell 

FRANK H. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 
No. 16, Boston 

W. G. HARBER, Mailers No. 16, Boston 

J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographical 
No. 13, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 37 

WEEKLY WAGE GUARANTEE FOR 
LAUNDRY WORKERS 

Whereas, The members of the Laundry Work- 
ers Union No. 66 are at present working un- 
der a vicious system of small hourly wages 
without any stated number of continuous hours 
in a day's work, which allows the employer to 
mercilessly exploit the workers in this indus- 
try by employing them oftentimes for a single 
hour, laying them ofif for one or more hours, 
and then employing_ them again for other hours, 
a system of pure industrial anarchy, and 

Whereas, These unbearable conditions have 
seriously affected the morale and health of our 
membership, and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts Laundrymen's 
Association has bitterly opposed the organiza- 
tion of these workers, and 

Whereas, A guaranteed weekly living wage 
is the objective of our membership, and 

Whereas, We have filed with the minimum 
wage commission of the Department of Labor 
a new decree demanding that a guaranteed 
weekly wage be instituted in our industry; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the incoming Executive Coun- 
cil, together with the Legislative Agent, be 
instructed to co-operate with Local No. 66 in 
obtaining the results demanded. 

ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers No. 

66, Boston 
MAUD F. VAN VAERENEWYCK, 

Retail Clerks No. 796, Boston 
FRANCIS NANGLE, Theatrical Service 

Employees Union No. 124, Boston 
THOMAS LOUGHLIN, Building Service 

Employees No. 175, Boston 
ROBERT H. EVERITT, Building Service 

Employees No. 30, Boston 
HOWARD H. LITCHFIELD, Central 
Labor Union, Cambridge 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Norwood (Laundry Workers 
No. 66, Boston) stated the Labor De- 
partment was working under a very 
small budget and felt that the Federa- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



95 



tion should support an increase in their 
budget. She told of employees in the 
laundries working under the minimum 
wage which, incidentally, has become a 
maximum wage, and also of the speed-up 
system under which they work for a 
very small weekly wage. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 32 

ENDORSEMENT OF WPA AND PRE- 
VAILING WAGE 

Whereas, The number of the unemployed is 
not decreasing in the same proportion as produc- 
tion output increases, and 

Whereas, Ten million American workers are 
without employment, and 

Whereas, Only an adequate WPA program 
can save these millions from the dry rot of the 
dole, and 

Whereas, The Woodrum Bill undermines the 
wage standards of Organized Labor, by elimi- 
nating the prevailing wage clause, curtails the 
number of WPA projects by raising the amount 
of the contributions payable by the cities and 
towns, robs American workers of the right to 
work and condemns them to the dole by its in- 
famous eighteen month clause; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this convention approves the 
principle of WPA, condemns the Woodrum Bill, 
and calls for the complete revision of its anti- 
labor provisions before the present Congress 
adjourns. 

WILLIAM BJORK, Painters No. 11, 

Boston 
JAMES A. HARDING, Plasterers, No. 10, 

Boston 
GRACE BARRY, Telephone Operators No. 

B1120, Boston 
MARY REAGAN, Telephone Operators 

No. B1120, Boston 
ANDREW BURT, Painters No. 11, 

Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 50 

REST ROOMS FOR LAUNDRY 
WORKERS 

Resolved, That the Executive Council and 
Legislative Agent be hereby instructed to pre- 
pare a bill to amend the present law (2091) 
governing rest rooms in laundries, so that 
laundry owners employing twenty-five or more 
workers will be compelled to provide rest rooms 
for their employees. 

ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers 
No. 66, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 49 

ADEQUATE WORK RELIEF LEGIS- 
LATION 

Whereas, The program of work relief through 
WPA has saved millions of workers from desti- 
tution, conserved their skills, enabled them to 
find new jobs, and contributed to the perma- 
nent wealth and morale of the nation, and 

Whereas, The dismissal of thousands of 
WPA workers, whose only crime is that they 
have been unable to find other employment 
during a period of 18 months or longer, works 
starvation and inhumanity upon over 30,000 
families in this commonwealth, and by suddenly 
removing in one sweep most of those who, by 
hard work, have secured promotion to posts of 
trust on their various projects will dangerously 
reduce the quality of work done by WPA, as 
well as entailing untold administrative troubles, 
and 

Whereas, The discontinuance of the prevail- 
ing wage system of payment endangers the 
entire wage structure of our state, and is 
therefore of urgent concern to Organized Labor, 
and 

Whereas, Further reductions in quota due 
to too small an appropriation, and further re- 
ductions in wages because of a new wage dif- 
ferential move favorable to the South than that 
prevailing hitherto, will result in hardship and 
starvation in all New England, and will place 
unbearable burdens upon local welfare depart- 
ments so as to result possibly in the bankruptcy 
of our local governments, and 

Whereas, The abolition of the theatre and 
other federal projects has resulted in the dis- 
missal of many of our brothers in affiliated 
unions, and 

Whereas, New restrictions upon so-called po- 
litical activity of members of the W.P.A. staff 
are so extreme as virtually to deny the right of 
public expression on vital issues to many of our 
brothers who hold appointments on such staff, 
and to whom we look for public support of the 
interests of Organized Labor; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we denounce the Emergency 
Relief Appropriation Act of 1939 as the product 
of a Congress more interested in partisan po- 
litical advantage than in the welfare of the 
people, and be it further 

Resolved, That we commend the leadership 
of the President in his effort to secure an ade- 
quate work-relief program, and be it further 

Resolved, That we urge that the President 
call Congress immediately into special session, 
in time to complete, before winter sets in, an 
adequate work relief act along the lines set 
forth above, which will restore jobs now being 
wiped out, provide employment in usual fields 
for all those qualiijed and in need of work, 
continue unimpaired the program of white-collar 
projects, restore adequate wages, and prevent 
further increase in the costs borne by local 
government. 

MANUEL SOUZA, Teamsters No. 59, 

New Bedford 
JAMES H. SHELDON, Teachers No. 

441, Boston 
DOROTHY B. DeLOID, Central Labor 

Union, New Bedford 
JOHN H. REYNOLDS, Teachers No. 

431, Cambridge 
ROSE NORWOOD, Laundry Workers 

No. 66, Boston 
JOSEPH L. MARION, Central Labor 

Union, Holyoke 
A. PEARLSTEIN, Teamsters No. 259, 

Boston 
HENRY H. BOWLES, Carpenters No. 

1416, New Bedford 



96 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 77 

COMMENDATION FOR EDITOR 

SALTUS OF WORCESTER LABOR 

NEWS 

Whereas, The National Federation of Post 
Office Clerks, the first government organiza- 
tion to affiliate with the American Federation 
of Labor, is carrying on a nationwide pub- 
licity campaign by means of a copyrighted 
newspaper mat service called "Postal Oddi- 
ties", and 

Whereas, Labor News, a newspaper pub- 
lished in Worcester, has subscribed to this 
service beneficial to the labor movement, and 

Whereas, The editor of Labor News has 
added to this feature extremely favorable 
material ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That Editor Freeman Saltus be 
commended for his interest and assistance 
to government organizations affiliated with 
the American Federation of Labor. 

JAMES E. WALSH, Post Office Clerks 

No. 497, Springfield 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Post Office 

Clerks No. 214, Lawrence 
JOHN B. MURRAY, American Federa- 
tion of Government Employees 178, 
Springfield. 
CHARLES E. CAFFREY, Springfield 

Central Labor Union 
BENJAMIN G. HULL, Westfield Cen- 
tral Labor Union 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 60 
DEFEAT OF FEDERAL LENDING BILL 

Whereas, The killing of the Administration 
Lending Bill by Congress will retard industrial 
recovery, keep relief rolls at very high levels 
and cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of 
dollars, and 

Whereas, It will result in throwing hun- 
dreds of thousands of persons onto the streets 
and prevent the re-employment of hundreds of 
thousands of others; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That this 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
condemn the actions of the Tory Republicans 
abetted by reactionary Democratics who are 
toying with the lives and security of our 
fellow citizens and that we hold up to public 
jpinion the Repulalican congressmen of Massa- 
chusetts, who collectively voted to kill the bill. 

WILLIAM BJORK, Painters No. 11 

Boston 
GERRIT OLDENBROOK, Retail Clerks 

No. 1445, Boston 
JOHN P. McCarthy, Retail Clerks No. 

1445, Boston 
ARMAND J. LONARDO, Retail Clerks 

No. 232, Lawrence 
OTIS SMITH, Retail Clerks No. 1435, 

Lynn 



JAMES G. LINEHAN. Retail Clerks No. 
1445, Boston 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 33 
REPEAL OF SO-CALLED HATCH LAW 

Whereas, The Hatch Bill recently passed by 
Congress and approved and signed by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt interferes with the constitutional 
political rights of citizens, and 

Whereas, Section 9a of this bill, under which 
wage workers employed on WPA projects or 
similar federal agencies under the control of 
executive departments, would be barred from 
being active members of progressive political 
parties, and 

Whereas, The Hatch Bill may eventually 
cause disfranchisement of millions of American 
citizens who, through unemployment, are com- 
pelled to seek government relief or employment, 
thus creating a class of political ward-heelers 
and economic serfs, such a class being the basis 
of fascism or totalitarian autocracy; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That this, the 54th annual conven- 
tion of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor, vigorously protests this bill and sends 
protests to the President of the United States, 
and Massachusetts Senators and Congressmen, 
seeking repeal of this un-American act. 

ANDREW BURT, Painters No. 11, 

Boston 
WILLIAM BJORK, Painters No. 11, 
Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Burt (Painters No. 11, Bos- 
ton) stated he was glad the Resolutions 
Committee had had a change of heart 
and said he felt it was one of the 
most important resolutions before the 
convention, and that as far as civil lib- 
erties and constitutional rights of the 
people were concerned, the bill would 
cause a condition worse or just as bad 
as that in Germany, Italy or other to- 
talitarian country. He said that he 
was only a private and wondered what 
would happen to him if he made po- 
litical utterances. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. M 

ANNUAL SESSIONS OF MASSACHU- 
SETTS LEGISLATURE 

Whereas, By referendum the citizens of this 
commonwealth saw fit to amend_ our state con- 
stitution at the last general election to the point 
where our state Legislatures will in this and 
subsequent years convene but once in every 
two years instead of annually as before, and 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



97 



Whereas, The general public was not properly 
instructed as to the dangers of such a system 
in state government which was clearly evi- 
denced by the fact that the outcome of the 
vote on the biennial sessions referendum was 
for a time in doubt as to its passage, and 

Whereas, The Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor was unalterably opposed to this 
amendment to the state constitution and vig- 
orously attempted to urge and influence the 
general public to defeat it, and 

Whereas, The prevalence of this amendment 
will undoubtedly result in retarding humane 
liberal labor legislation sponsored by the labor 
movement, and reduce our opportunities of 
passing such legislation by one-half, and 

Whereas, The very purpose of this amend- 
ment which was offered by the proponents 
urging its passage, namely econorny, has been 
already defeated in that the legislators have 
attempted through a legislative act to increase 
their salaries to compensate them for the salary 
they would lose in the year in which there was 
no legislative session, and subsequently tried to 
pass an act which would empower them to call 
themselves into session, which conclusively 
proves the fallacy of, and subjects to ridicule 
the principles upon which the biennial sessions 
amendment was founded, and 

Whereas, The year in which no legislative 
session was held would result in state rule by 
the Governor of the Commonwealth and his 
executive council, which seems an undemo- 
cratic way in which to conduct the affairs of 
the state; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the legislative committee of 
the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
be instructed to prevail upon the next session 
of the Legislature to take the initial steps to 
repeal the biennial sessions amendment to the 
constitution of Massachusetts. 

MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

JOSEPH STEFANI, Cooks and Pastry 
Cooks No. 186, Boston 

FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 

TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 
Union, Lawrence 

RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

JOHN A. FUSCO, Building Laborers No. 

175, Lawrence 
JOHN V. JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 

119, Lawrence 
JAMES H. SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 

90, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 

The committee recommended the reso- 
lution be referred to the incoming 
Executive CounciL 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 67 

ALLEGIANCE TO THE AMERICAN 
FEDERATION OF LABOR 

Whereas, The American Federation of 
Labor being our parent body and the or- 
ganization to which all_ our local and inter- 
national unions are affiliated, and 



Whereas, The history of this organization 
and its long record of success in advancing 
the cause of Organized Labor and securing 
benefits for its members is the best evidence 
of its worth, and 

Whereas, There has come to be a division 
in the ranks of Labor caused by the se- 
cession of some of its groups, and 

Whereas, This dual movement has forsaken 
even its original intention for the purpose 
of attacking and disrupting existing organiza- 
tions, and 

Whereas, It is the avowed purpose of this 
rebel group to engage in organization among 
the building trades workmen, and textile em- 
ployees ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the assembled delegates at 
the ,54th annual convention of the Massachu- 
setts State Federation of Labor do hereby 
pledge anew our allegiance to the American 
Federation of Labor and that we do all in 
our power to offset this baneful influence 
and give our undivided support to our brother 
members in all the various trades in which 
this battle is being carried on, keeping in 
mind that we do not know when our own 
craft may become the object of one of these 
attacks. 

JOHN F. WADE, Central Labor Union, 

Lawrence 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, Central Labor 

Union, Lawrence 
JOHN H. LEONARD, Street Carmen No. 

261, Lawrence 
EMMETT CUDAHY, Bakery Drivers No. 

686, Lawrence 
JAMES SULLIVAN, Bartenders No. 90, 

Lawrence 
JOHN JANIS, Brewery Workers No. 119, 

Lawrence 
MATTHEW P. MANEY, Carpenters No. 

Ill, Lawrence 
JAMES R. MENZIE, Carpenters No. 

1092, Lawrence 
GEDEON CHAMPAGNE, Carpenters No. 

551, Lawrence 
JOHN J. MULCAHY, Carpenters No. 

1566, Lawrence 
RAYMOND V. HILL, Teamsters No. 477, 

Lawrence 
JOHN F. O'NEILL, Electrical Workers 

No. 326, Lawrence 
HERBERT F. MORRIS, Electrical 

Workers No. B1006, Lawrence 
WALTER A. SIDLEY, Teachers No. 

244, Lawrence 
LEO F. McCarthy, Typographical No. 

51, Lawrence 
FRANKLIN J. MURPHY, Hotel & 

Restaurant Employees No. 319, Law- 
rence 
DANIEL F. GLYNN, Plumbers No. 283, 

ROBERT BARDSLEY, Musicians No. 

372, Lawrence 
HENRY L. MORENCY, Postal Clerks 

No. 366, Lawrence 
RALPH YOUNG, Stage Employees No. 
Ill, Lawrence 
The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Sidd reported for the Com- 
mittee on Union Labels, Buttons and 
Shop Cards, as follows: 



98 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



RESOLUTION NO. 79 

SUPPORT OF BARBERS UNION SHOP 
CARD 

Whereas, At the 15th annual convention 
of the Journeymen Barbers State Association 
held at Northampton on August 6, 1939, the 
delegates from different sections of the Com- 
monwealth complained that they were not 
receiving the full support of the union mem- 
bers of Labor in the patronage of our shop 
card ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we ask the delegates of 
the State Federation of Labor that when 
they return to their respective cities to ask 
their friends and fellow union members to 
only patronize shops that display the Barbers 
Union Shop Card. 

ARTHUR F. CARON, Barbers Union 
No. 30, Springfield 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Sidd moved the recommenda- 
tion of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



Delegate Russell reported for the 
Committee on Resolutions, as follows: 

RESOLUTION NO. 80 

SAFETY CODE FOR WINDOW 
CLEANERS 

Whereas, Many accidents and casualties 
have been caused by defective and the absence 
of safety devices on buildings in the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, and 

Whereas, There is no safety code at pres- 
ent governing window cleaning operations in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ; there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That a safety code for window 
cleaning operations be adopted and endorsed 
by this 54th annual convention of the State 
Federation of Labor; and be it further 

Resolved, That such safety code be in- 
corporated in the safety laws of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. 

JOHN COSTA, Window Cleaners Union 
No. 86, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



Whereas, It is common knowledge that 
these officials by their very training, have 
little sympathy for the rights of the workers, 
and 

Whereas, Such officials have been guaran- 
teed high salaries for life, too often have been 
used by big business and the politicians to 
throttle the liberties and the rights of the 
workers, and their being placed now in con- 
trol and supervision of civilian activity is 
detrimental to the rights and continued lib- 
erties of the organized, as well as the un- 
organized workers ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor, in convention assembled, 
call upon Senator Walsh and Senator Lodge 
and each of the Congressmen from our com- 
monwealth to seek legislation which will pre- 
vent any army or naval official being placed 
in control of civilian activities, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That our delegate to the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor convention be in- 
structed to present to that convention a reso- 
lution requesting that the American Federa- 
tion of Labor seek legislation which will 
prevent army or naval officials being placed 
in control or supervision^ of any governmental 
activity performed by civilian workers. 

J. FRANK BURKE, Typographical No. 

310, Lowell 
JOHN CONNOLLY, Bookbinders No. 

176, Boston 
W. G. HARBER, Mailers No. 16. Bos- 
ton 
EDWARD T. GAY, Pressmen No. 67, 

Boston 
J. ARTHUR MORIARTY, Typographi- 
cal No. 13, Boston 
WALTER F. McLOUGHLIN, Press As- 
sistants No. 18, Boston 
JOHN F. PERKINS, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
THOMAS LYNCH, Paper Rulers No. 

13, Boston 
GEORGE W. LANSING, Newspaper 

Pressmen No. 3, Boston 
THOMAS S. MADIGAN, Photo - En- 
gravers No. 3. Boston 
GEORGE F. DOHERTY, Stereotypers 

No. 2, Boston 
FRANK H. CALLAHAN, Bookbinders 

No. 16, Boston 
MARTIN J. CASEY, Electrotypers No. 

11, Boston 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Plate Boys, 
Paper Handlers and Press Clerks 
No. 21, Boston 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 62 

LEGISLATION TO PREVENT ARMY 

AND NAVY OFFICIALS FROM 

CONTROLLING CIVILIAN 

ACTIVITIES 

Whereas, Ours is a civilian government, 
and all other agencies of government are 
subordinate to this civil authority, and 

Whereas, The trend at the present time 
is to appoint in administrative positions offi- 
cers of the armed forces of the United 
States, in control of purely civil activities 
of our government, and 

Whereas, This is contrary to all principles 
of government by the people, as we under- 
stand it, and 



RESOLUTION NO. 10 

GOVERNOR SALTONSTALL'S RECOM- 
MENDATION TO CLOSE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Whereas, The American Federation of 
Labor since its beginning has always been 
a staunch supporter of public school educa- 
tion, and believing that proper education for 
the masses is the foundation of our govern- 
ment, and 

Whereas, As long as the working men and 
women of this country are organized in the 
American Federation of Labor, we will insist 
that every method shall be used to further 
the advancement of public school education. 
We will not tolerate for one moment any 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



99 



move on the part of any public official to 
lower the standards of public education, and 

Whereas, It has been the policy in recent 
years for public officials to slash the budget 
allotted to public schools, thereljy cutting the 
salaries of our teachers, instructors and other 
employees of our public school system to 
such a point that our educational facilities 
are being lowered to such a degree that it 
is seriously demoralizing the standards of 
education, which is detrimental to the wel- 
fare of our boys and girls throughout this 
nation, we, the members of Organized Labor, 
will see to it that such public officials shall 
be removed at election time and replace them 
with citizens who will maintain and keep 
our public school educational system at the 
high standard it merits ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we disapprove the recom- 
mendation of His Excellency, Governor Salton- 
stall, to close four of the nine teachers' col- 
leges of this state, and be it further 

Resolved, That we vigorously condemn the 
ways and means committee for its recom- 
mendation to slashing the budget to suoh 
a low figure that our state colleges cannot 
operate properly on the high standard to 
which they are entitled; we also condemn 
this committee for not making provisions for 
the year of lO-lO, and be it further 

Resolved, That we hereby demand that the 
original appropriation allotted our state col- 
leges be restored, and in the future kept 
at a level whereby our schools can function 
properly, and be it further 

Resolved, That we commend the members 
of the Legislature who served on the com- 
mittee of education for their loyalty and de- 
votion to our public school education in op- 
posing the closing of any of our teachers' 
colleges. We, the delegates, heartily endorse 
their action, and be it further 

Resolved, That the incoming Executive 
Council, together with the Secretary-Treas- 
urer-Legislativc Agent be instructed to com- 
bat any movement by any public official or 
any group, through the press and voice of 
the radio, who attempts to retard or lower 
the standards of public school education. 

BENJAMIN G. HULL, Westfield . Cen- 
tral Labor Union 
JOSEPH L. MARION, Holyoke Central 

Labor LTnion 
CHARLES E. CAFFREY, Springfield 

Central Labor LTnion 
SIDNEY E. LeBOW, Lowell Central 

Labor Union 
JOHN H. GRIFFITH, Lowell Central 

Labor Union 
EDWARD C. ENO, Electrical Workers 

No. B-ini.5, Lowell 
URBAN FLEMING, Holyoke Central 

Labor Union 
JAMES E. WALSH, Post Office Clerks 

No. 497, Springfield 
ARTHUR J. PAYETTE, Moving Picture 

Operators No. 186, Springfield 
THOMAS M. NOLAN, Typographical No. 

13, Boston 
ANDREW C. TILLEY, Federal Labor 

LTnion No. 18.518, Chicopee 
NATHAN SIDD, United Garment 

Workers No. 1, Boston 
FRANCIS T. REARDON, Federal Labor 

Union No. 20291, Westfield 
WILLIAM DYNAN, Federal Labor Union 

No. 18518, Chicopee 

The committee recommended the fol- 
lowing resolution be substituted for 
Resolution No. 10: 



KESt^LUTlOiX NO. 90 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Whereas, The American Federation of Labor 
since its beginning has always been a staunch 
supporter of public school education, and be- 
lieving that proper education for the masses 
is the foundation of our government, and 

Whereas, As long as the working men and 
women of the country are organized in the 
American Federation of Labor, we will insist 
that every method shall he used to further 
the advancement of public school education. 
We will not tolerate for one moment any move 
on the part of any public official to lower the 
standards of public education, and 

Whereas, It has been the policy in recent 
years for public officials to slash the budget 
allotted to public schools, thereby cutting the 
salaries of our teachers, instructors and other 
employees of our public school system to 
such point that our educational facilities are 
being lowered to such a degree that it is seri- 
ously demoralizing the standards of education, 
which is detrimental to the welfare of our 
boys and girls throughout this nation, w;e, the 
members of organized labor will see to it that 
such public officials shall be removed at elec- 
tion time and replace them with citizens who 
will maintain and keep our public school edu- 
cational system at the high standard it merits; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we disapprove the recom- 
mendation of His Excellency Governor Salton- 
stall in recommending the closing of four of 
the nine teachers colleges of this state and also 
the action of the Mayor and School Committee 
of Boston in refusing to admit the entering 
class to Boston Teachers College this coming 
Fall; and be it further 

Resolved, That we vigorously condemn the 
ways and means committee in its recommenda- 
tion of slashing the budget to such a low figure 
that our state colleges cannot operate properly 
on the high standard to which they are en- 
titled; we also condemn this committee for not 
making provisions for the year of 1940; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That we hereby demand that the 
original appropriation allotted our state colleges 
he restored and that the Boston Teachers Col- 
lege continue to function as heretofore and that 
in the future appropriations be kept at a level, 
whereby these schools can function properly; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That we commend the members of 
the Legislature who served on the Committee 
of Education, for their loyalty and _ devotion to 
our public school education in opposing the clos- 
ing of any of our teachers' colleges. AVe, the 
delegates, heartily endorse their action; and be 
it further 

Resolved, That the incoming Executive Coun- 
cil, together with the Secretary-Treasurer-Leg- 
islative Agent be instructed^ to combat any 
movement by any public official or any grouo, 
through the press and voice of the radio, who 
attempts to retard nr lower the standards of 
public school educatien. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Hull (Central Labor Union, 
Westfield) thanked the committee for 
recommending concurrence and agreed 
with the changes recommended. He 
said that delegates should go back home 
and inform their members as to what 
had happened. He stated that when 
a politician interfered with the public 



100 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



school system he should be removed, 
whether he be a mayor or a governor. 
He also stated that he was a Republican 
and had introduced the governor at ral- 
lies in Westfield, but when the question 
of closing the state colleges came up 
he went to the State House to discuss 
the matter, as he had always been told 
the Governor would be willing to sit 
down and talk on matters, but the Gov- 
ernor was "too busy" to see him. He 
stated that politicians must come to the 
realization that teachers and custodians 
are also voters. He felt it was very 
important and that we should demand 
our public school institutions be con- 
tinued. 

Delegate Murray (Newspaper Press- 
men No. 3, Boston) wanted to know 
what good it was to educate children 
to be school teachers if when they grad- 
uated there were no jobs. He felt that 
Resolution No. 66 should have been 
adopted. He also felt that a state uni- 
versity should be established and offer 
educations for anyone, regardless of 
whether or not they desire to become 
teachers. 

The motion was then adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 13 

LEGISLATION TO PREVENT ARMY 
AND NAVY OFFICIALS FROM 
CONTROLLING CIVILIAN 
ACTIVITIES 

Whereas, During recent years an ever- 
increasing number of army and naval officials 
both from the active and retired lists, are being 
placed in control and supervision of civilian 
activities, and 

Whereas, Men who have been trained for 
years to accept and to give orders, without 
those under them having any right to discuss 
the workability or feasibility of such orders, 
surely are not fitted, in a free country, to be 
placed in any position to supervise, on govern- 
mental work, the activities of free American 
workers on work outside of army or naval 
work; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor, in convention assembled, call 
upon the Congress of the United States to 
enact legislation which will make illegal the 
placing of army or naval officials in charge of 
any governmental activity, wherein such army 
or naval officials, either active or retired, will 
be placed in charge of any activity on the part 
of civilian workers, other than work done di- 
rectly for the army or navy, and be it further 

Resolved, That our delegate to the American 
Federation of Labor convention be instructed 
to request that similar action be taken by the 
American Federation of Labor and that the 
American Federation of Labor officially seek 
legislation which will make illegal the placing 
of army or naval officials in charge of civilian 
activities. 

JOHN J. MARA, Boot and Shoe Workers 

"O," Boston 
GEORGE T. DOUGLAS. Boot and Shoe 
Workers 1-0, Haverhill 



The committee recommended that the 
resolutions be made a matter of record 
as a similar resolution had previously 
been adopted. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Norwood concluded the re- 
port of the Committee on Union Labels, 
Buttons and Shop Cards, reporting for 
the committee, as follows: 

Union patronage of union-made goods and 
services is one of the oldest tenets in the 
faith of Organized Labor. The principle is at 
once so simple, so just, and so logical that it 
should scarcely need to be expounded at all. 
We are all familiar with the arguments, the 
appeals, and the beseechings which prevail at 
every Labor gathering, for the purpose of 
awaking the rank and file of Organized Labor 
to the vital importance of the use of the vast 
consuming power of the Labor Movement for 
the enhancement of the Labor cause. 

Patronage of union-made goods will not cost 
a member of Organized Labor a penny in value 
lost. In fact, the chances are strongly in 
favor of his getting better return for his dol- 
lar if he spends it on union goods. The sen- 
timental and moral compensations to the 
sincere trade unionist who consistently spends 
his wage as he earns it, under union condi- 
tions, are great. As an organizing force, the 
guaranteed application of a stream of purchas- 
ing power in the desired _ direction, or if _ the 
circumstances so dictate, its withdrawal, is a 
remarkable leverage. 

Women are the purchasing agents in the 
homes of workers. There are 250,000 such 
homes in association with Organized Labor in 
Massachusetts. Assuming that the union 
wage of the primary wage earner in each such 
family is at an average of $35 a week, we 
have in the hands of these women for expend- 
iture $8,000,000 a week, more or less, to divert 
the course of history in behalf of Organized 
Labor in Massachusetts. 

Since we believe in the union label and 
union purchase of union goods and since we 
also believe in organization, can we not per- 
suade ourselves to the simple logic of organiz- 
ing our women into auxiliaries or label 
groups, for the purpose of influencing at its 
source the flow of union money into the pur- 
chase of union goods. 

Delegate Norwood recommended the 
report of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Russell spoke as follows: 

In the past three months we have lost from 
our midst some of our most important and sin- 
cere trade union officials. Your committee has 
before it several resolutions asking this con- 
vention to recognize its losses through the pass- 
ing of such friends as Charles D. Keaveney, 
Charles Kimball, Sylvester McBride, John P. 
Meade, Mary V. Murphy, William F. Nutley, 
Charles Reed, George Sanderson, and others. 
Your committee respectfully recommends the 
following as a substitute for those now in the 
committee's possession: 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



101 



RESOLUTION NO. 91 
IN MEMORY OF DECEASED MEMBERS 

Whereas, Almighty God, in his wisdom, has 
called from our midst several prominent, loyal 
and devoted trade unionists who have served 
their respective organizations and the Massa- 
chusetts Labor Movement unselfishly and whose 
devotion has contributed in no small way to the 
progress and success of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, In His judgment our Saviour has 
called to eternal rest Charles D. Keaveney, In- 
ternational Vice-President of the International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and Presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts State Association of 
Electrical Workers; Charles Kimball, Interna- 
tional Representative, United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America; Sylvester 
McBride, former President of Boston Typo- 
graphical Union, delegate to the Boston Central 
Labor Union and the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor conventions; John P. Meade of 
the Boot and Shoe Workers Union, who served 
the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
as Legislative Agent and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as Director of the Division of In- 
dustrial Safety; Mary V. Murphy, of the Bos- 
ton Musicians Union, Treasurer of the Boston 
Central Labor Union and Vice-President of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor ; 
Charles E. Reed, assistant to President Daniel 
Tracy of the International Brotherhood of Elec- 
trical Workers and former Business Agent of 
the Lynn and Salem locals of Electrical 
Workers; and George Sanderson, Business 
Agent of Electrical Workers No. 224 of New 
Bedford and former Vice-President of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor, and 

Whereas, These active members of various 
branches of the American Federation of Labor 
will always be remembered as pioneers and 
champions of the cause of the Labor Movement; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention of 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
express the sincere sympathy of the Labor 
Movement of Massachusetts to the families of 
our late brothers and sister and spread upon 
the records of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor a copy of these resolutions, and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the delegates to the 54th an- 
nual convention stand in silent meditation in 
memory of our late associates. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was unanimously adopted, 
the delegates standing in silent medita- 
tion for one minute. 

RESOLUTION NO. 38 
STATE WAGES AND HOURS LAW 

Whereas, The promises made by the Gover- 
nor and Senator Lodge in the campaign last 
fall regarding the state Wages and Hours 
Bill in speeches at Pittsfield, Adams and 
North Adams, "Immediately after my inaugu- 
ration as Governor," said Saltonstall, "I shall 
press for the enactment of a state law to 
supplement and make workable the national 
Wages and Hours Law. Decent standards — 
standards that are higher than the 25 cent 
minimum of our national Wages and Hour 
law — must be set up for Labor." "The peo- 
ple of Massachusetts know," he said, "that 
the all-important factors in any man's ability 
to be of service to his fellowmen are sin- 
cerity, integrity and truth"; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we, the delegates to the 



54th convention of the Massachusetts State 
I'edcration of Labor, condemn the silctu.c of 
the Governor and Senator Lodge and the 
other leaders of the administration, now in 
power on Beacon Hill, whilst the -State Wages 
and Hours Bill was being sabotaged by those 
senators and representatives who showed by 
their votes that they feel the workers of 
Massachusetts are not worth 30 cents per 
hour. 

JOHN P. McCarthy, Retail Clerks 
No. 1445, Boston 

OTIS SMITH, Retail Clerks No. 1435, 
Lynn 

Delegate Russell stated: 

Your committee has been unable to locate the 
sponsors of the resolution and were at a loss to 
know what to do. We have attempted not to 
condemn anyone unless we had the facts before 
us and were at a loss to know just what posi- 
tion Senator Lodge took in this matter. We 
are going to ask that the sponsors of the reso- 
lution present us with the facts.^ While we 
were sure of the action of the Governor, we 
have not the facts on Senator Lodge, as re- 
ferred to. The committee suggests that the 
words "and Senator Lodge" be deleted, not be- 
cause he might not be deserving of condemna- 
tion, but because we would not want to do so 
unless we had the facts. Your committee, 
therefore recommends concurrence in the reso- 
lution with the deletion of the words "and Sen- 
ator Lodge." 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

RESOLUTION NO. 85 
RESOLUTION OF THANKS 

Whereas, The organized labor movement 
of the City of Boston has entertained the 
convention in a most splendid manner, and 

Whereas, The press of the city and the 
state has been especially active and co-opera- 
tive, and 

Whereas, The citizens of the city have 
supported and cooperated in all efforts to 
make our stay here most pleasant and 
memorable, and 

Whereas, The city and state officials have 
extended to the delegates and visitors to this 
convention all possible courtesy and assist- 
ance ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor does in this way extend to our fellow 
trade unionists of Boston, to the people of 
the city, the officials of the city, to the press, 
and to the following, our heartfelt thanks for 
their generous hospitality and their part in 
makine this a most successful convention : 

Reverend Father George A. Hines 

George Murray, Acting Mayor of the City of 
Boston 

Ray C. Kirkpatrick, Assistant on Labor Rela- 
tions, Public Works Administration 

John Pearson, New England Regional Direc- 
tor, Social Security Board 

John T. McDonough. New England Regional 
Administrator. Works Progress Administration 

Robert J. Watt. American Workers' Delegate, 
International Labor Organization 

Leverett Saltonstall, Governor, Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts 



102 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



Dennis W. Delaney, Massachusetts Adminis- 
trator, Works Progress Administration 

Francis P. Fenton, Director of Organization, 
American Federation of Labor 

James T. Moriarty, Commissioner, Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industries 

Warren Jay Vinton, Housing Authority, 
Washington 

Leon Arkin, Jewish Daily Forward 

John L. Barry, President, New Hampshiie 
State Federation of Labor 

C. M. Fox, President, United Textile Work- 
ers 

I. M. Ornburn, Secretary-Treasurer, Union 
Label Trades Department 

John Carroll, Chairman, Massachusetts Hous- 
ing Board 

Daniel A. Goggin, Chairman, Entertainment 
Committee, Boston Central Labor Union 

John J. Kearney, Vice-President, Boston 
Central Labor Union 

Harry P. Grages, Secretary, Boston Central 
Labor Union 

The committee recommended concur- 
rence. 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

Delegate Grages (Central Labor 
Union, Boston) spoke as follows: 

As secretary of the convention arrangements 
committee, it is my pleasure to thank the dele- 
gates, their wives and friends for their pa- 
tience and cooperation in working with us to 
make this convention a success. The attitude 
and action of the delegates and their friends 
was certainly appreciated by the convention 
committee of the Boston Central Labor Union, 
and again I thank the delegates and their 
friends. 

■ The motion was then adopted. 



RESOLUTION NO. 87 

SALARIES OF MEMBERS OF COM- 
MITTEE ON CREDENTIALS AND 
OTHERS 

Resolved, That the 54th annual convention 
pay members of the Credentials Committee, the 
Sergeant-At-Arms and Assistant Sergeant-At- 
Arms the sum of $2.5.00. 

NATHAN HURWITZ, Laundry Drivers 
No. 168, Boston 

Delegate Russell moved the recom- 
mendation of the committee be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Velleman (Stenographers No. 
14965, Boston) moved that the report 
of the Committee on Resolutions be 
adopted as a whole. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, 
Boston) asked the consent of the con- 
vention to make a statement. 



There being no objection, Delegate 
Nolan was granted the floor. 

Delegate Nolan told of his interna- 
tional union not paying the one-cent 
assessment adopted by the American 
Federation of Labor and said that ac- 
tion would no doubt be taken by the 
A. F. of L. He wanted the delegates 
to know that members of the I. T. U. 
were loyal. He said they were orga- 
nized since 1852, while the A. F. of L. 
had been organized since 1882 and that 
the L T. U. did not have a charter from 
the A. F. of L., but instead had a cer- 
tificate of affiliation. He said that he 
hoped organizations sending delegates 
to the American Federation of Labor 
convention would do all in their power 
to prevent the suspension of the I. T. U. 

Delegate Hurwitz (Laundry Wagon 
Drivers No. 168, Boston) moved that the 
matter be referred to the delegate to 
the American Federation of Labor. 

Delegate Fleming (Central Labor 
Union, Holyoke) spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

I don't think it is right to place the respon- 
sibility on the shoulders of our Secretary- 
Treasurer. It is a momentous question and 
this convention should take a stand on it. I 
don't want to criticize the International Typo- 
graphical Union, but I do want to remind them 
that the strength of their organization is be- 
cause of the fact that_ Organized Labor has 
supported them, and it is foolish for this state 
branch to go on record to support the I. T. U. 
because it failed to pay its assessment. Our 
Secretary will have only one vote and if he 
takes a position in opposition to the wishes of 
some of the officers there he places himself in 
the position of being criticized. I think this 
convention should instruct Secretary Taylor and 
not place the responsibility on his shoulders. 

Delegate Hurwitz, with the consent 
of the convention, withdrew his motion. 

Secretary Taylor spoke on the matter, 
as follows: 

I doubt very seriously whether there is any- 
thing this convention can do to influence the 
national convention on this matter. I think it 
will ultimately be settled by the International 
Typographical Union and the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. It is true that my organiza- 
tion is not paying the additional one-cent as- 
sessment. Consequently the American Federa- 
tion of Labor will take some action and I doubt 
that any action we may take will alter the 
situation. 

Delegate Moriarty (Typographical No. 
13, Boston) spoke on the matter, with 
the following remarks: 

As a member of the union we are discussing, 
T want to say that nothing has happened, and 
I believe the I. T. U., together with friends 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



103 



in the A. F. of L., will be lakcn care of by 
the American Fcilrration of Labor. Delegate 
Nolan only wanted to create a moral efifect. I 
don't think we shoull take any action. 

President Morrissey resumed the 
chair. 

President Morrissey then introduced 
Ralph Diehl, representative of the Union 
Labor Life Insurance Company, who ad- 
dressed the convention with the follow- 
ing remarks: 

I want to express my appreciation for the 
privilege of addressing this convention in behalf 
of the Union Labor Life Insurance Company 
and at the same time extend to you the fra- 
ternal greetings of the president of that com- 
pany, Matthew Woll. Your organization has 
been addressed many times in the past on this 
subject. You are acquainted with the aims, 
objects, purposes, policies, and growth of the 
company. As stockholders of this great enter- 
prise you are also vitally interested in the suc- 
cess your company has enjoyed. At the end 
bf the fiscal year 1938, your company had over 
$69,000,000 of insurance in force, affording in- 
surance protection to the families and depend- 
ents of over 80,000 wage earners in America. 
This has been tremendous growth in a short 
period of time, but it would not have been pos- 
sible without the undivided support of Organ- 
ized Labor throughout the country. I want 
to draw your attention to one particular phase 
of our company, inasmuch as it has made it 
possible for trade union groups to participate 
in life insurance under group contracts. Up 
until the Union Labor Life Insurance Company 
entered the field, and not until we went into the 
field with the aid and assistance of the various 
state branches, were we able to change the laws 
in 22 states, but today any labor union can 
avail itself of the cheapest form of protection 
on group policy. That is something I hope 
the delegates will take back to their various 
locals. 

We sell and have available all the types of 
policies that can be bought in the life insurance 
field. Insurance from birth to age 60. 

The reception J have Received here in the 
past week has been very gratifying, I must 
say. I believe I received more requests at 
this convention than any other convention I 
attended. It seems to be a reflection of the 
work that is being done here in New England 
for the past four or five years. I only hope 
we will continue to merit your favorable atten- 
tion when it comes to group life insurance or 
individual policies and I assure you the LTnion 
Labor Life Insurance Company will do every- 
thing possible to continue the confidence you 
have already placed in us. Thank you. 

Delegate McCall for the Committee 
on Credentials, reported that 448 dele- 
gates had been seated. 

Delegate McCall then moved that the 
report of the Committee on Credentials 
as a whole be adopted. 

The motion was adopted. 

Delegate MacDonald, Chairman of the 
Committee on Grievances, reported that 
no grievances had been submitted. 



There being no objection, the report 
of the committee was adopted. 

Delegate Norwood (Laundry Workers 
No. 66, Boston) moved that the Presi- 
dent appoint a committee, either from 
the convention or from the officers, to 
call all parties in the laundry industry 
together within two weeks. 

The motion was adopted. 

Secretary Taylor reported for the 
tellers, announcing that 327 ballots had 
been cast, with the following result: 



PRESIDENT 

NICHOLAS P. MORRISSEY 

Teamsters No. 2.5, Boston 327 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, First District 
JOHN J. BUCKLEY 

Teamsters No. 25, Boston 169 

ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE 

Plate Boys and Paper Handlers No. 21, 

Boston 191 

JOHN F. DONOVAN 

Coal and Fuel Drivers No. 68, Boston.. 02 
WILLIAM J. DOYLE 

Electrical Workers No. 103, Boston.... 148 
HARRY P. GRACES 

Central Labor LTnion, Boston 177 

MICHAEL J. O'HARE 

Street Carmen No. 589, Boston 94 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Second District 
HORACE F. CARON 

Carpenters No. 1305, Fall River 327 

HERBERT S. FERRIS 

Electrical Workers No. 223, Brockton... 327 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Third District 
EDWARD C. ENO 

Electrical Workers No. B-1015, Lowell.. 327 
TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL 

Central Labor Union, Lawrence 327 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Fourth District 
CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK 

Teamsters No. 170, Worcester 327 

CHARLES F. GRIFFIN 

Paper Makers No. 12, Fitchburg 327 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Fifth District 
CHARLES E. CAFFREY 

Central Labor Union, Springfield 327 

BENJAMIN G. HULL 

Central Labor Union, Westfield 327 

SECRETARY-TREASURER- 
LEGISLATIVE AGENT 
KENNETH I. TAYLOR 

Typographical No. 216, Springfield 327 

DELEGATE TO AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR CONVENTION 
KENNETH I. TAYLOR 

Typographical No. 216, Springfield 327 



104 



Proceedings of the 54th Annual Convention 



ALTERNATE DELEGATE TO AMERI- 
CAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
CONVENTION 

JOHN M. SULLIVAN 

Teamsters No. 25, Boston 327 

Secretary Taylor announced for the 
tellers, that the following officers were 
elected for the ensuing year. 

PRESIDENT 
NICHOLAS P. MORRISSEY 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, First District 

JOHN J. BUCKLEY 

ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE 

HARRY P. GRACES 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Second District 

HORACE F. CARON 

HERBERT S. FERRIS 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Third District 

EDWARD C. ENO 

TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, Fourth District 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK 

CHARLES F. GRIFFIN 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, Fifth District 

CHARLES E. CAFFREY 

BENJAMIN G. HULL 

SECRETARY-TREASURER- 
LEGISLATIVE AGENT 
KENNETH I. TAYLOR 

DELEGATE TO AMERICAN FEDERA- 
TION OF LABOR CONVENTION 
KENNETH L TAYLOR 

ALTERNATE DELEGATE TO AMERI- 
CAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
CONVENTION 
JOHN M. SULLIVAN 

President Morrissey called upon Dele- 
gate Nolan (Typographical No. 13, Bos- 
ton) to administer the oath to the 
elected officers. 

There being no further business to 
come before the convention, President 
Morrissey declared the 54th annual con- 
vention adjourned at 7:30 p.m., sine die. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent. 



^oint Repcrlt 

of the 

Oxecutioe Gouncil anh OUiceis 



to the 



jinvj-Tcuiili ClnHual UonOeniion 




JOINT REPORT 

of 
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL AND OFFICERS 

Your officers I'espectfully submit this report of their work and the busi- 
ness transacted during the past year by the Executive Council. This volume 
contains the report of your President, Vice-Presidents and Secretary-Treas- 
urer-Legislative Agent. It also sets forth the activities of the Executive 
Council, as well as much general information. 

Delegates will note that the Executive Council has departed somewhat 
from the past policy with regard to its annual report, and has included a sum- 
mary of activities of various government agencies, state and federal, hopeful 
that such information will be of interest and benefit to those in attendance 
at the 54th annual convention. Besides a report of the past year's activities 
numerous recommendations are made for the consideration of the delegates. 
Careful study should be made of these matters as some may have a decided 
effect upon the future success of the organization. 

At the call of President Nicholas P. Morrissey the Executive Council met 
quite frequently. Members of the Council unanimously report that harmony 
and cooperation have been the watchwords, realizing both are very important 
if the Federation is to continue in the direction of progress. This report indi- 
cates the gains made along lines of affiliations, finance, legislation, prestige 
and usefulness to affiliated organizations. 

Legislative matters are outlined in the report of your Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent. This year has been one of the busiest and most strenuous 
on Beacon Hill. In fact at the time the officers' report to the convention was 
prepared, the Legislature was still in session indicating that the 1939 session 
would be a record-breaker. 

This joint report is submitted with the sincere hope that delegates to the 
54th annual convention will give it their most careful consideration so that 
their deliberations and actions will contribute much to the future progress of 
the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor. 



108 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 
Greetings : 

In accordance with my constitutional duty I hereby submit my first report 
as your President of the activities of my office and other matters considered 
by the Executive Council during the past year. 

Upon taking over the duties of President, I was pleased to note that the 
condition of our State Federation of Labor was most enviable. Our finances 
were at a desirable high level, our affiliations were many in number, and the 
service being rendered to local unions most satisfactory. It was my deter- 
mination to pick up where former Presidents James T. Moriarty and John F. 
Gatelee left off, and endeavor to carry on the splendid work done by my 
predecessors. To this end I have tried, to the best of my ability, to steer the 
State Federation of Labor in the direction of being more effective and bene- 
ficial to its affiliated unions and members, as well as all wage earners who rely 
on our great organization as their agency of defense. 

I am pleased to report that our great organization continues to progress 
and expand, and with pardonable pride I say that it now stands second to 
none among the State Federations of Labor of this nation. Our bank account 
has expanded, notwithstanding an increased overhead and now reveals that 
$20,088.59 is deposited in our name as available cash. Affiliated unions have gone 
beyond 600 as a total, in fact we are now made up of exactly 631 per capita pay- 
ing local organizations. In addition, many of the local unions affiliated with the 
State Federation over the years have expanded greatly, which reflects to some 
extent in the amount of revenue received. 

During the year prior to the last convention, the Executive Council be- 
came aware that our office space and facilities were inadequate and not being 
expanded with sufficient rapidity to keep in line with the tremendous progress 
of the organization itself. Consequently, this matter was given consideration 
immediately. We now have a most modern and attractive headquarters, with 
much-needed equipment being added. 

Last fall the Federation actively participated in the state election. Hold- 
ing fast to our traditional principle of being non-partisan, we had occasion 
to seek the defeat of several lawmakers and the reelection of others, and were 
successful in numerous instances. I am especially happy to report that Labor's 
political strength was displayed very forcefully in the western part of the 
state where the Labor movement of that area, with the cooperation of your 
officers, reelected Senator Chester T. Skibinski of Chicopee, whose record on 
Labor matters was 100 per cent for the years 1937 and 1938. Although it 
appeared to some that Senator Skibinski had less than an even chance of re- 
turning to the Massachusetts Senate, the Federation's united support of his 
candidacy and the work of trade unionists in that district caused the young 
senator from Chicopee to return to the Senate with about 11,000' votes to 
spare. In other areas many senators were reelected, not because of the trend 
or a magic wand, but because of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor's 
active support. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 100 

Our major task last fall was in connection with the gubernatorial contest 
between James M. Curley and Leverett Saltonstall. After consulting the offi- 
cial records which revealed the attitude of each candidate toward trade union- 
ists, the Executive Council was left no choice but to condemn the labor record 
of Leverett Saltonstall and endorse the candidacy of James M. Curley. Your 
officers became immediately active, advocating the defeat of Leverett Saltonstall 
on the basis of his labor record, which revealed that he voted against labor 
37 times and only voted in favor of our measures on three occasions. Regard- 
less of the outcome, the political experts concede that the campaign conducted 
by the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor was most effective. Though 
Mr. Saltonstall was the victor, I am satisfied that Labor was operating on all 
cylinders. The demonstration last fall, if it did nothing else, was a means of 
telling future candidates for the office of Governor that their march to the 
Capitol can be made much easier with a good labor record. My only regret 
was to note that Labor has in its family a few political self-seeking members 
who of course had no official standing, but were trotted out as alleged spokes- 
men for Labor. It is unfortunate that the undisputed record was insufficient 
for them to adhere to our policy, "elect our friends and defeat our enemies." 

In connection with the campaign conducted last fall I can only say that we 
are very grateful to the many central bodies and local unions throughout the 
Commonwealth for their cooperation and support. It is my hope that central 
bodies and district and regional labor groups will continue their non-partisan 
activities in future political campaigns. Each local group should have active 
committees evaluating the attitudes and records of candidates for public office. 
They should be geared, so to speak, to cooperate with this organization whose 
business it is to prepare and distribute the records of all lawmakers. 

During the fall, in addition to our political activities, our campaign for 
new affiliations was carried on with gratifying results. The actual report of 
affiliations will be found elsewhere in this report. 

Regional Conferences were conducted again this year and in my opinion 
were very successful. Secretary-Treasurer Taylor and I attended them all, and 
I found the interest at a high point. 

The matter of investigating the activities of the State Labor Relations 
Commission also required much of our time, which was conducted as a result 
of instructions from the 53rd annual convention. In order to carry out the 
wishes of the delegates in attendance at the last convention, it was considered 
important that certain records of cases before the State Labor Relations 
Commission be made available to us for an impartial study. Accordingly, we 
requested certain information relating to the Commission's activities, which, 
in my opinion, should be available to any interested person or organization. 
But notwithstanding the fact that two trade unionists are members of the 
Commission, we were denied the information sought, which caused your officers 
to conclude that members of the Commission preferred to keep the result of 
cases and their other activities secretive for some unknown reason. It would 
seem that if the criticism which was offered against the Commission, before, 
during, and since the last convention was unjustifiable the Commission would 
in self-defense be happy to grant our request for certain data. It has been, 
and still is my opinion that the Commission is doing a very poor job. We 
continue to receive nothing but complaints against its members. However, we 
were obliged to disagree with some trade unionists who, during the course of 



110 Joint Report of Executive Gouncil and Officers 

the year, wanted the members of the Commission removed. We were fearful 
that requesting their removal might be somewhat like jumping from the frying 
pan into the fire, as our experience with Governor Saltonstall regarding recom- 
mendations offered by the Executive Council to fill certain vacant Labor posts 
reveals a batting average of .000. 

Serious consideration was given by the Executive Council to two matters 
which I consider of great importance. One was the matter of future conven- 
tion cities with adequate hotel facilities and meeting places to handle future 
conventions. Our increased membership means a larger number of delegates, 
thus there is real need for a study of this matter. A committee made up of 
members of the Executive Council was appointed to investigate and report 
with recommendations, which is submitted with the unanimous approval of 
the Executive Council elsewhere in this report for the delegates' consideration. 
The other matter involved the question of per capita tax payment. We have 
many local unions paying on small memberships.* An extreme illustration is 
in one instance where a local union pays on a membership of two. After dis- 
cussing this matter at length, it is the feeling of the Executive Council that 
a minimum charge be made of $1.00 per month, which seems to tbe smalli 
enough. Without imposing any undue hardship upon any local union, it pro- 
vides a means of increasing the revenue to this organization, which may be 
used in the futvire if the facilities to serve our affiliates are increased, which, 
in my opinion, is inevitable, judging by the progress made during the course 
of the past seven or eight years, as well as the year just ending. A report 
submitted by the Executive Council will also be found elsewhere in this report. 

During the early weeks of the legislative session we were confronted with 
a legislative proposal to reorganize the Unemployment Compensation Commis- 
sion. The suggested bill abolished the Commission and reorganized the system 
under a Division of Unemployment Compensation. Not being satisfied with 
the bill as drawn, a committee composed of Vice-President William J. Doyle, 
Secretary-Treasurer Kenneth I. Taylor and myself consulted with legislative 
leaders, insisting upon certain changes so that Labor would continue to have 
proper representation in the administration of the newly-organized division. 
In addition, the Executive Council vigorously insisted that James P. Meehan, 
Commissioner, and Fred J. Graham, Director of the Massachusetts State Em- 
ployment Service be retained within the reorganized division. Unfortunately, 
the Governor disregarded our request by only reappointing Fred J. Graham 
as a Deputy in charge of the Employment Service, and made no provision for 
James P. Meehan, even after an amendment providing for a labor relations 
representative was included in the final draft of the bill, which everyone under- 
stood to be designed especially for Jim Meehan. Several other appointments 
were made in this division, among them being two Labor representatives on 
the Advisory Council. In this regard the Executive Council made recommen- 
dations which were also disregarded by Governor Saltonstall, as was our sug- 
gestion made for a position on the Board of Review within the Division of 
Unemployment Compensation. 

The Executive Council has given much thought to the subject of taxation 
which seems to be an outstanding matter on Beacon Hill. Of course the sales 
tax, which was again filed with the Legislature, was vigorously opposed by 
the Executive Council. Two tax proposals were considered as possible propo- 
sitions that could be sponsored by the State Federation of Labor as ways of 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



increasing the revenue to the Commonwealth. One was referred to the Execu- 
tive Council by the Boston Central Labor Union. It provided for a one per 
cent payroll tax on employers and one per cent tax on wages of employees. 
The other proposal was offered by J. Arthur Moriarty, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Boston Typographical Union, which would be a tax on interest received 
by banks and other such institutions in connection with mortgages held on 
homes and other real estate. The Council decided not to propose either propo- 
sition without the consent of a convention. 

It is my recommendation that a tax committee be appointed to explore 
and consider tax matters that may affect trade unionists. Such a committee 
might well give serious thought to tax propositions which have been ill- 
considered in the past on Beacon Hill, such as a tax on intangibles, a gradu- 
ated income tax and other proposals. 

Our attention was focused on the fight in Congress a few weeks ago, rela- 
tive to the emergency relief bill which reached the Senate after having been 
passed by the House without any provision for a prevailing wage. We immedi- 
ately contacted our two United States Senators, urging them to vote and insist 
upon the insertion of the provision dealing with the prevailing wage rate. 
Frankly, their replies cause me to be in doubt as to exactly where they stood 
while the fight was being waged in that branch of Congress. Nevertheless, 
the bill passed with the 130-hours-pei--month provision, breaking down the 
prevailing wage rate which took the building trades, especially, years to 
establish. 

Several months ago the Executive Council of the American Federation of 
Labor reached into Massachusetts and took from our midst their capable 
New England Representative, Francis P. Fenton, and exalted him to the posi- 
tion of Director of Organization for the American Federation of Labor. This 
recognition of Frank's hard work and many accomplishments met with the 
whole-hearted approval of all who know him. In his place is John J. Murphy 
of Worcester, who had been serving as an organizer under Frank Fenton. 
Brother Murphy is trying hard and deserves the cooperation of the entire 
labor movement. 

I complete my first term as President with a deep feeling of satisfaction 
and gratification. Much has been accomplished during the year which reflects 
and will continue to reflect in benefits to Massachusetts trade unionists. My 
associations with members of the Executive Council have been most pleasant 
and amicable. For their cooperation and assistance during the year I am in- 
deed thankful. It is a source of comfort to know that the affairs of the 
Federation are in the hands of Secretary-Treasurer Taylor. Working with 
him during my term of office has been a real pleasure. I certainly appreciate 
the alertness of efficient Agnes T. Kane whose "service with a smile" and con- 
stant cooperation have surely added much to the success during the year. Our 
new member of the office staff, Esther F. Cahill, has proved to be conscientious 
and most interested in the work of the Federation. 

I extend my sincere thanks to Commissioner James T. Moriarty for his 
splendid cooperation during the past year. His understanding of our problems 
has caused us to continue having confidence in the Department of Labor and 
Industries, which, as we all know, was not the case prior to his being 
appointed to that position. 



112 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 



In conclusion I wish to thank Massachusetts trade unionists for the oppor- 
tunity and privilege they afforded me to serve as their President. I am equally 
thankful for the splendid assistance and cooperation extended by organizations 
and members throughout the Commonwealth. 



Respectfully submitted, 



'-y^JLioA '?.''>V\^^'^AM>^J^ 



President. 




Massachusetts State Federation of Labok 1 1 '■', 

VICE-PRESIDENTS' REPORTS 

DISTRICT I. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

At the last annual convention I was chosen as one of the Vice-Presidents 
of the First District, an honor which I shall long remember and a respon- 
sibility of which I have been always aware during the course of the year. I 
submit to the delegates this report of my activities during my term of office. 

I was in attendance at all meetings of the Executive Council and sin- 
cerely endeavored to assist in solving the many problems that confronted 
the State Federation of Labor. My actions and my votes as a member of the 
Council were influenced only by my determination to have Executive Council 
decisions react beneficially to our membership and other wage earners in 
Massachusetts. 

On several occasions it has been my pleasure to have served with Presi- 
dent Morrissey and Secretary-Treasurer Taylor on committees appointed to 
study and solve, when possible, problems affecting our membership, especially 
legislative matters including the reorganization of the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Commission and numerous tax proposals that have been considered 
by the Legislature. During the legislative session, I responded to every 
request and was able to attend and participate in many of the legislative hear- 
ings when measures involving the interests of our membership were being 
considered. 

I have endeavored to be of general assistance to the many local unions 
which comprise the First District, giving advice in connection with organi- 
zation activities and negotiations with employers. My assistance has also been 
available to those with problems such as workmen's compensation and labor 
relations. 

I am very grateful for the opportunity to have served as a Vice-President 
of the First District and as a member of the Executive Council. I am also 
grateful for the cooperation extended by the affiliated unions of the First 
District during the year. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM J. DOYLE, 

Vice-President, District 1. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the. 54th Annual Convention of the 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 
Greetings: 

As a Vice-President of the First District, I hereby submit my report 
for the past year. I have attended all meetings of the Executive Council 
with the excepi;ion of one, due to my duties as Secretary of the Boston Cen- 
tral Labor Union, 



114 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

My duties as Vice-President are similar to my duties as Secretary of 
the Boston Central Labor Union. I have been active in organizing all classes 
of workers, and have attended many meetings of locals not affiliated with the 
State Federation, stressing upon them the need for affiliation, 

I have attended many legislative hearings at the State House, in order 
to get favorable action on our bills. I have written many letters to the 
Senators and Representatives in Washington, seeking favorable action on 
our bills and resolutions. 

In closing this report, I wish to express my appreciation to the various 
unions and the Executive Council of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY P. GRACES, 

Vice-President, District 1. 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As one of your Vice-Presidents for the First District, I hereby submit 
the report of my activities for the past year. I have complied with all re- 
quests from local unions for assistance and advice, and feel confident that I 
have accomplished many of the things sought by the local unions I have 
aided. With the assistance of other members of the Executive Council I 
have endeavored to carry out the instructions given us by the 53rd annual 
convention, especially with regard to legislative matters of concern to Labor. 

Whenever possible, I attended legislative hearings at the State House. 
In addition, I assisted by keeping in touch with Senators and Representatives 
in my vicinity, advising them of the measures in which Labor was interested, 
and requesting that they support the State Federation's legislative program. 

The annual Regional Conference for the First District was held in Boston 
in conjunction with a meeting of the Boston Central Labor Union. It was 
very instructive to those in attendance. My opinion is that such conferences 
should be continued. 

During the political campaign last fall, I actively participated by advo- 
cating the election of Labor's friends and the defeat of those who oppose us. 
In this connection, I extended cooperation to the non-partisan political com- 
mittee in my district. 

In conclusion, I wish to say that I have attended all meetings of the 
Executive Council; did everything possible to increase our affiliations, and 
have enjoyed my work as a member of the Executive Council, which has done 
splendid work for the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL J. O'HARE, 

Vic§-President, District 1. - 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 115 

DISTRICT II. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As one of your Vice-Presidents of the Second District, I respectfully 
submit this report of my activities during the course of the past year. I 
have attended and participated in meetings of the Executive Council, endeav- 
oring to the best of my ability to solve the problems confronting Massachu- 
setts trade unionists. During these times of depression, wage earners must 
be alert constantly. Problems of employment, legislation, organization, and 
many others, have been and still are before us. In these matters I have 
always conducted myself so that our members would be properly cared for. 

I have attended many meetings of unaffiliated unions in my district, 
urging them to become a part of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
and participate in the splendid work it is doing. It is gratifying to report 
that in many instances such local unions have voted to join the State Fed- 
eration. 

During the legislative session, the Regional Conference for this district 
was held at Fall River, over which I had the honor of presiding. Those in 
attendance obtained a most interesting and instructive outline of the Federa- 
tion's legislative programs, together with an explanation of proposed laws 
which Labor opposed, and other matters of interest to trade unionists. 

My efforts were also directed toward advising the Senators and Rep- 
resentatives of my district as to legislation desired by Labor and the bills 
that Labor opposed, urging them to vote accordingly. 

This year has been my first term as Vice-President and a most enjoyable 
one. I sincerely appreciate having been chosen to serve in this capacity, and 
express my thanks to those who made it possible. I also express my thanks 
to the various local unions of my district for their cooperation during the 
year, and to the members of the Executive Council for their many courtesies. 

Respectfully yours, 

HORACE CARON, 
Vice-President, District 2. 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

I respectfully submit this report of my activities during the past year 
as one of the Vice-Presidents of the Second District and as a member of 
the Executive Council. The honor of representing the State Federation of 
Labor in my district and the activity such a position provides is certainly 
interesting and worthwhile. 

The tremendous expansion of the State Federation in the past four years 
and the standing of our organization in the Commonwealth, made me realize 



116 Joint Eeport of Executive Council and Officers 

that decisions and actions of the Executive Council were of extreme impor- 
tance, necessitating- careful consideration and sound judgment. I was able 
to attend each Council meeting and I am completely satisfied that its every 
action was in the best interest of the hundreds of affiliated unions and their 
members. 

Two Regional Conferences were conducted in the Second District during 
the winter months, one at Fall River in charge of my colleague, Vice-Presi- 
dent Caron, and the other at Brockton, over which I had the pleasure of 
presiding. Both were most successful and instructive. The customary policy 
of inviting unaffiliated unions resulted in much new interest in our activities 
and also increased the number of unions affiliated with the State Federation 
of Labor from this district. 

Much of my time was devoted to organization work, assisting local unions, 
speaking before unaffiliated locals and fulfilling assignments given to me by 
President Morrissey and Secretary-Treasurer Taylor. Along lines of organi- 
zation work, I am pleased to include in my report the fact that my efforts 
to bring the progressive Retail Clerks Union of Brockton under the banner 
of the American Federation of Labor was successful. For several years this 
organization was independent, having previously been a local of the Retail 
Clerks International Protective Association. Time and attention were also 
given to the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 161 of Brockton, 
the Culinary Alliance, as well as many others that requested my services. 

Although the Senator and Representatives from the Brockton area are 
supporters of legislation sponsored by the State Federation of Labor, our 
program was constantly called to their attention by the undersigned "just 
in case." 

Being a member of the Executive Council has been both an honor and 
a pleasure. The work has been most interesting and the results obtained 
indeed gratifying. I sincerely thank trade unionists of my district and else- 
where for giving me the privilege of serving as a member of the Council, 
and for the constant assistance given to me during the course of the year. I 
am indeed grateful to President Morrissey, Secretary-Treasurer Taylor and 
members of the Executive Council for their assistance and cooperation. And 
to Miss Agnes T. Kane, I am very thankful for the many courtesies she so 
willingly extended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT S. FERRIS, 

Vice-President, District 2. 



DISTRICT III. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

This report ends my second term as one of your Vice-Presidents of the 
Third District. It has been a most pleasant duty and an honor to have rep- 
resented such a splendid group of union men and women. I have attended 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 117 

all meetings of the Executive Council and have taken part in the important 
deliberations of problems w^hich came before the Council. With my colleague 
in this district, Vice-President Timothy H. O'Neil, we sponsored and con- 
ducted a most successful regional conference at Lawrence, over which I had 
the honor of presiding. This meeting afforded an opportunity to trade union- 
ists to obtain first-hand explanations of the legislative matters and other 
activities of the State Federation of Labor, and also brought about several 
new affiliations for the Federation. 

During the legislative session, I made every effort to attend all hearings 
of importance to the labor movement and as representative of the Lowell 
Central Labor Union had occasion to attend and participate in many. It 
is somewhat disappointing to attend these important hearings and find so 
few trade unionists present, especially when we realize how many thousands 
of members the Federation has in Massachusetts. But after seeing and hear- 
ing our most able Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent, Kenneth I. Taylor, 
in action, many may feel that the State Federation of Labor's case is well 
taken care of. We organize and form unions because we know that singu- 
larly we can get nowhere, but as a group we accomplish much. By the same 
token why should we not remain mindful of our traditional belief, "in num- 
bers there is strength," when important labor bills are being considered on 
Beacon Hill. I am sincerely hopeful that this matter will be given its proper 
consideration by trade unionists throughout the Commonwealth and that 
legislative hearings conducted in the future by Brother Taylor will be well 
attended. 

To me it would be very discouraging when "hatchet men," some from 
our own ranks, stand in opposition; but Brother Taylor carries on as though 
he had a room full of labor men behind him. (Carry on. Ken!) It sure 
is a pleasure to work with and for him. It would be hardly fair not to 
acknowledge the splendid cooperation of his capable secretary, Miss Agnes T. 
Kane, who realizes his every need in connection with his never-pnding task 
and is never without the required assistance at her finger tips. 

I have endeavored to fulfill all assignments given to me and have given 
unsparingly of my time to organizing activities in the Third District. It 
has been a pleasure indeed to work with our woi'thy President, Nicholas P. 
Morrissey, who has carried on nobly in the face of many obstacles. It has 
again been my privilege to attend the meetings of unaffiliated local unions 
to relate the value of being affiliated with the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor. While we didn't rise to last year's record, much good has been 
accomplished and many new affiliations were obtained. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the trade unionists of the Third District 
for their splendid and unselfish cooperation. It has been a pleasure to have 
served with such an excellent group of men as we have on the Executive 
Council. Whether or not I am returned to this honorable office, I want each 
ti'ade unionist of my district to feel free to call on me for assistance at 
any time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES M. ERWIN, 

Vice-President, District 3. 



118 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As one of your Vice-Presidents from the Third District, which I have 
had the honor and privilege to represent, I hereby tender my report for the 
past year. 

I have attended all the meetings of the Executive Council with the excep- 
tion of one. 

I presided at the annual Regional Conference which was held in Law- 
rence. Kenneth I. Taylor gave a splendid resume of the bills affecting 
Labor which were presented to the Massachusetts Legislature. 

I heartily approve the continuance of such conferences as I have a strong 
conviction that they are instrumental in bringing to the individual trade union- 
ist a better understanding of the actual problems that confront the Labor 
Movement in Massachusetts, and a more appreciative realization of what is 
accomplished by the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor. 

I have at all times during the past year endeavored to fulfill all assign- 
ments placed in my hands by President Nicholas P. Morrissey and Secretary- 
Treasurer Kenneth I. Taylor to the best of my ability. 

I have been unsparing in my efforts to assist new local unions in the 
Third District in order to guide and protect them in the establishment of 
wage scales and improved working conditions; and have given my aid and 
assistance to all Trades Unionists in my district in matters pertaining to 
the general welfare of the Labor Movement. 

During the legislative session, I attended and influenced many members 
of affiliated unions in my district to attend legislative hearings to favor 
labor legislation and oppose legislation which was detrimental to our move- 
ment. I am pleased to report that the Third District was well represented 
when hearings took place and on more than one occasion we have paged our 
respective legislators in the lobby of the State House and made known to 
them the position of organized labor in reference to various legislative bills. 
I am cognizant of the fact that the zeal displayed by our Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent, Kenneth L Taylor, has resulted in strengthening our posi- 
tion and maintaining our place as one of the most progressive and potent 
State Federations of Labor in the United States. 

I am deeply grateful to Miss Agnes T. Kane for the many courtesies 
extended to me and for her willingness to oblige on all matters during the 
course of my administration. 

As my first term as Vice-President comes to a close, I wish to say that 
it has been an honor which I shall long remember to have served the Third 
District on the Executive Council, and in conclusion, I wish to sincerely 
express my thanks to all officers and delegates from the Third District as 
well as to my colleagues on the Executive Council, with whom it has been 
a privilege to associate during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY H. O'NEIL, 

Vice-President, District 3. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor ]]'.) 

DISTRICT IV. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As Vice-President of the Fourth District, I desire to submit a report 
of my activities during the course of the year. It was my privilege to attend 
most of the meetings of the Executive Council and to participate in the 
discussions in connection with the many problems confronting Labor in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

During the legislative session the annual Regional Conference was held 
in the City of Worcester, at which Vice-President Griffin had the honor of 
presiding. The meeting was most instructive. Secretary-Treasurer Kenneth 
I. Taylor outlined the legislation which was considered by the Legislature 
this year, giving a clear picture of the problems of Labor on Beacon Hill. 
It must have been inspiring to the representatives of unaffiliated unions, 
who are invited to these gatherings, to learn of the splendid work carried on 
by our Federation. 

My time and services have been at the disposal of local unions of the 
Fourth District during the year. Among other activities, I have attended 
meetings of unions not attached to the State Federation and outlined the 
advantages of being affiliated and in some instances my visitations resulted 
in new affiliations. Unions have called on me from time to time for advice 
which was always given unstintingly. 

I have just finished my second term as Vice-President of the State Fed- 
eration. It has been an honor which I shall not forget, to have represented 
the Fourth District on the Executive Council. My sincere thanks are ex- 
tended to unions of that district and members thereof for the cooperation 
extended. I also wish to convey my appreciation to President Morrissey, 
Secretary-Treasurer Taylor, Miss Agnes T. Kane, and members of the Ex- 
ecutive Council for the courtesies and cooperation extended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHESTER G. FITZPATRICK, 

Vice-President, District 4. 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

At its 53rd annual convention the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor elected me to the office of Vice-President to represent District 4. I am 
very grateful to the men and women who have honored me in such a manner 
and I deeply appreciate the opportunity of serving the trade unionists of 
Massachusetts during the past year. 

At the outset, let me offer a brief word of thanks to the entire office staff 
at 11 Beacon Street. Each and every one of them has been most helpful, alert 
and willing to assist in solving the problems that have come up from day 
to day. 



120 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Immediately following the primaries of September the Executive Council 
decided that the legislative record of Leverett Saltonstall should be condemned 
and that the candidacy of James M. Curley should be endorsed; and further, 
that the officers should be instructed to do everything possible to bring about 
his election to the office of Governor. I am glad to report that I carried out 
these instructions, speaking in behalf of Mr. Curley at meetings of local unions, 
trade councils and central bodies, and condemning the record of Mr. Saltonstall. 
In like manner, I attended political rallies in the Fourth District, especially 
in Gardner, Leominster and Fitchburg, explaining the hardships that biennial 
sessions would impose upon the working people of the Commonwealth. At all 
of these gatherings I publicized the legislative record of local representatives 
and state senators and in strict accordance with these records, I either en- 
dorsed or condemned their candidacy. 

During the course of the year I have had occasion to visit with local 
unions that were not affiliated with the state branch. Some of these through 
my efforts have joined with us, and are helping to carry on with the work we 
are doing. However, I have noticed a condition that seems to be universal 
throughout the Commonwealth, and I respectfully call it to your attention for 
your serious consideration. A large number of local unions, representing wage- 
earners engaged in the same or similar crafts have not affiliated with us. I 
refer in particular to the letter carriers, post office clerks and railway clerks. 
I recommend that a definite campaign be inaugurated at once to bring these 
people into our organization, thereby strengthening our membership and in- 
creasing our income. 

On two occasions I was accorded the honor of presiding over Regional Con- 
ferences. In March, Vice-President Fitzpatrick was busily engaged in settling 
the tri-state truck strike and invited me to Worcester to preside in his absence. 
This invitation I gladly accepted. In April, the people of Fitchburg and 
vicinity were privileged to hear our Secretary outline legislation in which we 
were interested. I am confident that I express the opinion of all of these 
people when I state that a great deal of good was derived from these meetings, 
and that they should be continued in the future. 

From the time the Legislature convened in January until the present day, 
I have consistently contacted the representatives and senators from my district 
whenever any legislation, either favorable or unfavorable to us, has come up 
in the State House. On each occasion I have endeavored to state our case 
clearly and to convince these legislators that our position was the correct one. 
I was able to appear before committees that conducted the hearings on these 
measures, notably the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on 
Labor and Industries. Early in May I was very much interested in our State 
Fund Bill when it came up for a vote in the State House. I am happy to re- 
port that most of the members of the General Court from my district voted for 
the roll call and the bill itself. 

This brief summary, then, is my report to you for the busy year that is 
passing. In conclusion, I wish to thank the other members of the Executive 
Council, the members of local unions of District 4, and all others who in any 
way helped me in fulfilling my duties as Vice-President of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES F. GRIFFIN, 
- Vice-President, District 4. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 121 

DISTRICT V. 

To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As one of the Vice-Presidents of the Fifth District, I submit this report 
of my activities in this section. I attended all meetings of the Executive 
Council during the past year. 

The Massachusetts State Federation of Labor had a number of important 
labor bills before the Great and General Court this year. I was present 
at many of the hearings and spoke before the various committees to record 
this district in favor of beneficial labor legislation and to oppose legislation 
which would be detrimental to the best interests of Labor. 

The annual Regional Conference in Springfield was held in February 
this year and was very largely attended. Nicholas P. Morrissey, our Presi- 
dent, and Kenneth I. Taylor, our Legislative Agent, spoke at this conference, 
in which great interest was shown and it proved to be very interesting and 
instructive. 

In this district, as in past years, it has been a busy year for Labor. 
I have continued to help organize new unions, to assist those already organ- 
ized, and to endeavor to bring back into the State Federation unions which 
have withdrawn within the past year or two. 

In addition to speaking before organized trade union groups and con- 
ventions, I have addressed several civic and educational groups to acquaint 
them with the aims and policies of our State Branch of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. Important among these "outside" groups was the Mas- 
sachusetts Vocational Education Convention held at Springfield. 

Also, I have represented the State Federation of Labor in this district 
at hearings of the various state committees, among them being the recess 
committee appointed to study the Unemployment Compensation Law. This 
recess committee met at Springfield and I was present at the meeting to 
explain Labor's views on the workings of the Unemployment Compensation 
Act. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the efforts and cooperation of the 
various unions in this district, the Springfield Central Labor Union, and 
the Executive Council and office staff of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. CAFFREY, 

Vice-President, District 5. 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

Greetings : 

As one of your Vice-Presidents of the Fifth District, I desire to submit 
a report of my activities during the past year. I attended and took an active 
part in all meetings of the Executive Council. Being my first term as a 



122 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Vice-President, it has been indeed gratifying to note the earnest consideration 
that members of the Council give to the many problems which affect Massa- 
chusetts workers. I am convinced that their actions have been motivated 
only by their strong desire to ably represent those who rely upon them for 
guidance and leadership. 

I wish to respectfully call attention to a matter which I consider of 
real and serious concern to working men and women. In May of this year, 
Governor Saltonstall recommended to the Legislature that four of our Teach- 
ers Training Colleges be abandoned. Of course the Massachusetts Federation 
of Taxpayers wasted no time patting him on the back for such a "courageous 
act" and again approved the proposal at their "flea circus" at Boston. No 
consideration was given by the Governor or the "Tax Dodgers' Association" 
to the fact that the institutions of learning they proposed closing are a few 
colleges to which wage earners can afford to send their children. I vigorously 
opposed closing these teachers colleges and carried on my fight for their 
retention into the press and before interested groups of citizens and tax- 
payers. Mayor Raymond D. Cowing of Westfield appointed me to a citizens' 
committee of 250 to oppose the Governor's proposal. In addition, I attended 
the legislative hearing on this matter. 

I wish to express my thanks to Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent 
Kenneth I. Taylor for the splendid argument he gave before the Committee 
on Education against closing these colleges, and also Vice-President Charles 
M. Erwin of the Third District, who was present to oppose the recommen- 
dation. 

During the course of the year I appealed to a number of unaffiliated 
local unions urging them to become a part of the Massachusetts State Fed- 
eration of Labor. I find that a large number of letter carriers and post- 
ofBce clerks are not affiliated. I have urged them to join. We need them 
and they need us. I took special interest in legislative matters concerning 
workers and am convinced that we must continue with our shoulders to the 
wheel if we expect to convince our lawmakers that we insist on humane laws 
to safeguard the workers of our Commonwealth. 

During the year I have assisted many local unions in this district and 
have cooperated with Vice-President Caffrey 100 per cent, as he has with me. 

In conclusion, I wish to commend President Nicholas P. Morrissey, who 
has given his all for the benefit of the workers. Too much praise cannot 
be given our very able Secretary-Treasurer, Kenneth I. Taylor, who has 
proven himself to be a human cyclone for the cause. I also express my 
thanks to Misses Agnes T. Kane and Esther F. Cahill, who have served with 
a wonderful spirit of cooperation. The welcome sign is extended by those 
two young ladies for everyone who visits our office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN G. HULL, 

Vice-President, District 5. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 123 

REPORT OF THE DELEGATE TO THE FIFTY-EIGH IH ANNUAL 
CONVENTION OF THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

The fifty-eighth annual convention of the American Federation of Lahor 
was held at Houston, Texas, from October 3 to 13 inclusive. As your delegate 
I submit the following report of convention activities: 

I had the honor of submitting two resolutions on behalf of the State 
Federation in accordance with the instructions of the fifty-third annual 
convention. 

The first was Resolution No. 14 which, after endorsing the principle 
that hours of work should be reduced in proportion to the increase in the 
productivity of labor, asked that a survey of each industry be conducted by 
a competent commission working in co-operation with the Department of 
Labor and the Works Progress Administration. The convention unanimously 
adopted the recommendations of the Resolutions Committee that the resolu- 
tion be referred to the incoming Executive Council for investigation and 
action. 

Resolution No. 69 called for widespread advocacy and use of union 
watermark paper produced by the International Brotherhood of Papermakers. 
Upon motion of the Committee on Labels this resolution was adopted as 
written. 

Although this was the first convention of the American Federation of 
Labor which I have attended as a delegate, I was honored as your repre- 
sentative by selection as a member of the Committee on Education. Because 
of pending legislation for federal aid to state systems and the growing im- 
portance of vocational and apprentice training, the deliberations of the 
committee were perhaps unusually significant and the Committee were pleased 
that their recommendations were acceptable to the convention. 

The delegates reviewed the history of negotiations for unity in the labor 
movement and adopted the recommendations of the Committee on Resolutions 
that the convention "authorize the Executive Council to continue to carry on 
the battle and at the same time stand ready to respond to any genuine appeal 
for peace or any honorable and sincere opportunity to reunite the lahor 
movement." 

The operations of the National Labor Relations Board were also reviewed 
at length with the result that the convention adopted the Resolutions Com- 
mittee recommendations that amendments dealing with the following subjects 
• should be presented to Congress: 

(1) The unit rule must be changed to conform to that which is 
in the Railway Labor Act so that it will be obligatory on the Board 
to grant a craft or class the right to select its bargaining representa- 
tive by majority vote. 

(2) The power of the Board to invalidate contracts must be 
definitely curtailed. 

(3) Every known interested pai'ty should be served with due 
process and be aff"orded an opportunity to appear in any case. No 
contractual rights should be passed upon without every party to the 
contract being served with process and given the right to appear in 
the case. 

(4) Intervention by interested parties should be made a matter 
of right and not a matter of discretion. 



124 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 



(5) Definite qualifications should be set forth in respect to 
examiners. Some are wholly incompetent and unfit to serve in that 
capacity. In fact affidavits of prejudice should be permitted to be 
filed against them where an examiner is considered unfair. 

(6) Clarification respecting power over the issuance of sub- 
poenas is necessary and liberalizing of the rule in that respect should 
be provided. 

(7) The secrecy of files must be lifted to the extent that all 
persons may have an opportunity to examine a record which contains 
material on which decisions are made. The idea of keeping informa- 
tion and material in a secret file and then utilizing it in connection 
with other evidence as a basis for the decisions smacks of star 
chamber proceedings. 

(8) Elections shall be conducted within thirty days from 
filing of a petition therefor. 

(9) All cases shall be decided within 45 days after the close 
of the taking of testimony. 

There are two propositions which we acknowledge are controversial. 
We recommend that the Executive Council consider them further: 

First: Jurisdiction shall be granted appellate courts to review 
the facts as well as the law to determine whether the decision con- 
forms to the weight and credibility of the evidence. 

Second: Separate the administrative functions from the judicial 
functions of the Board, lodging the judicial functions in a tribunal 
wholly independent from the National Labor Relations Board." 

The convention also adopted resolutions opposing confirmation of Donald 
Wakefield Smith to the Board and asking for the removal of certain members 
of the personnel of the Board. 

The remarkable organizing activities of the Federation and affiliated 
national and international organizations were well reflected in the report 
submitted to the convention which showed a membership as of August, 1938, 
of 3,623,087 in 32,631 local unions. The report showed 102 national and 
international unions affiliated with the American Federation. There are 
1517 directly chartered local trade and Federal labor unions. 

Among the many distinguished speakers who addressed the convention 
was our old friend and my predecessor. Bob Watt. He gave a most thorough 
and interesting report of the findings of President Roosevelt's special com- 
mission to investigate labor relations in Great Britain and Sweden, for which 
he was highly complimented by President Green. Your former Secretary- 
Treasurer also reported on the activities of the International Labor Organiza- 
tion of which he serves as a Labor Representative on the Governing Body. 

As your delegate, I attended all the sessions of the convention and found 
them very instructive and helpful to me in preparation for our own state 
legislative program. The extent to which my attendance may have accom- 
plished your assignments was in no small measure due to the several 
colleagues from our state who freely assisted and guided me out of their 
experience through previous participation in the deliberations of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

May I express my appreciation to the convention for the privilege and 
honor accorded me by my selection as delegate of the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor to the 58th Annual Convention of the American Federa- 

Respectfully submitted. 




Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 125 



REPORT OF SECRETARY-TREASURER-LEGISLATIVE AGENT 



S^C5^ 



To the Officers and Delegates to the 54th Annual Convention of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor: 

The following report outlines the State Federation of Labor's legislative 
activities during the 1939 session of the Massachusetts Legislature. The origi- 
nal report to the 54th annual convention was somewhat incomplete due to the 
fact the Legislature was in session when the report was printed. This revised 
report contains and sets forth the final action of the Legislature on all legisla- 
tive matters in which the State Federation of Labor was interested. 

It is pleasing to note that we end another year of progress for the State 
Federation of Labor. Elsewhere in this joint report will be found a complete 
outline of the Federation's gains. 

Biennial sessions of the Legislature are now a part of the Constitution 
of Massachusetts, meaning that in 1940 the Legislature will not convene 
unless a special session is called by the Governor or by members of the General 
Court. It is too early to outline the numerous disadvantages that Legislative 
sessions every second year will present and the adverse affect biennial ses- 
sions will have on Labor's constant legislative needs. The "off year" in 1940, 
when necessary legislation cannot be sought, may lead to the recommendation 
that the voters be asked to reconsider their action of 1938. 

By waiting until the 55th annual convention to consider the matter fur- 
ther no time will be lost. A proposal to have the Legislature convene annually 
cannot be submitted to the voters before 1944. Two successive Legislatures 
must approve such a petition in joint session before it can find a place on the 
ballot. 

In connection with the amendment to the State Labor Relations Act which 
was sponsored by the Federation and unanimously enacted by the Legislature 
(page 127), the delegates will be intreested to know that the C. I. 0., which 
opposed the measure, recently started circulating a petition in an attempt to 
suspend the law, thus have it appear on the ballot at the next state election. 
The change is the same as the amendment being sought by the American 
Federation of Labor to the National Labor Relations Act. It safeguards 
craft unions by compelling the commission to certify a craft unit if a ma- 
jority of such a group so desire, rather than to leave with the commission 
members the right to disregard the wishes of a minority group of skilled 
mechanics. 

If C. I. O. obtains the requii-ed number of signatures it means that the 
voters of Massachusetts will be, in effect, voting for the American Federation 
of Labor or the C. I. O. Anyone can predict the outcome of such a contest — 
except the so-called high command of the C. I. 0. apparentiy. 



126 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

BILLS FAVORED BY LABOR AND ENACTED INTO LAW 

Elimination of Employee Contribution to Unemployment Compensation Fund 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Eliminate the Employees Contribution to the Unemployment Com- 
pensation Fund — Senate Bill No. 146. (Subsequently substituted by 
House Bill No. 2441.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives June 26, adopted by the Senate 
June 29 and signed by the Governor June 30. Now^ Chapter 319. 

Last year it appeared that the Unemployment Compensation Fund was 
increasing so rapidly that the 1 per cent contribution by employees was un- 
necessary. It was therefore suspended for one year. During that time when 
workers were not paying the assessment the fund continued to increase, not- 
withstanding the substantial amount paid to idle workers in benefits. 

The fund increased to more than $60,000,000. Even employers acknowl- 
edged that there was little need of employees contributing. In fact they and 
the Advisory Council of the newly-organized Division of Unemployment Com- 
pensation began designing ways and means of reducing the tax of 2.7 paid 
by employers. Realizing of course that workers would have to be taken into 
consideration as they provided a reduction for employers the Advisory Coun- 
cil, supported by employers, proposed that the employee contribution be further 
suspended until the fund reached a low point of two-thirds of the greatest 
amount paid in benefits in one year during the past 10. Then the employee 
contribution would be re-imposed until the fund reached the greatest amount 
paid in benefits in one year during the past 10. 

This proposition was embodied in House Bill No. 2319, which also con- 
tained other amendments to the Unemployment Compensation Act recom- 
mended by the Advisory Council in place of all amendments to the law that 
were before the Committee on Labor and Industries. 

With the bill before the House Committee on Ways and Means and July 
1st nearing, at which time the one-year suspension of the employee contribu- 
tion expired, the committee reported a separate bill providing for the above- 
described method of assessing employees. In the House of Representatives a 
vigorous fight was conducted by Representative Frederick B. Willis of Saugus, 
aided by Representative Charles V. Hogan of Lynn, against the recommended 
bill, which resulted in the substitution of a bill for outright repeal of the em- 
ployee contribution. Substitution prevailed by a vote of 117 to 71 on roll call. 

In the Senate an attempt was made to rescue the Advisory Council's 
proposed bill by offering it as a substitute for the repeal bill passed by the 
House, but failed 13 to 13 on roll call. The following day another attempt was 
made to block outright repeal. A bill was offered to suspend employee con- 
tributions for two years. This attempt also was futile, being rejected on roll 
call, 20 to 17. 

The Senate fight was most vigorous, with the score rather close at times. 
But Senator Albert Cole of Lynn very ably handled the Federation's side of 
the two-day contest, with the assistance of Senator Thomas M. Burke of 
Boston, which resulted in the permanent elimination of employee contributions 
to the Unemployment Compensation Fund, 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 127 

Partial Payment of Unemployment Compensation Benefits 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Amend the Unemployment Compensation Act So As to Stop the 
Practice of Penalizing Unemployed Persons Who Accept Part-Time or 
Subsidiary Work, and to Encourage the Acceptance of Such Work — 
Senate Bill ,No. 148. (Subsequently made part of House Bill No. 2568.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives August 11, adopted by the Senate 
August 11 and signed by the Governor August 12. Now Chapter 490. 

This amendment to the Unemployment Compensation Act seems to be the 
most popular and least controversial of all amendments filed during this year's 
session of the Legislature. Even the Advisory Council of the Division of 
Unemployment Compensation jumped aboard after waiting to see how the wind 
was blowing. 

At present many workers who accept part-time work do not realize they 
render themselves ineligible for benefits for the week in which such work is 
done. The law or its interpretation tends to discourage workers who would 
be happy to accept part-time employment, hopeful that it may lead to steady 
employment. 

During the recent study conducted by a special commission it was brought 
out that a Lynn shoe worker was called upon by his employer to process a few 
sample shoes. The shoe worker, glad to accommodate, returned to work long 
enough to finish certain sample work and received 46 cents. When he appeared 
at the district office of the Unemployment Compensation Commission he was 
told that he was ineligible for benefits that week because he had earned 46 
cents. 

This is one amendment that is absolutely needed. It will eliminate con- 
fusion, and workers will be encouraged to accept part-time employment with- 
out fear of losing benefits. 



Amendment to Labor Relations Act 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Amend the Labor Relations Act by Defining Bargaining Units — 
House Bill No. 820. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives June 6, adopted by the Senate June 
19 and signed by the Governor June 26. Now Chapter 318. 

This amendment to the so-called "Baby Wagner Act" is designed and 
intended to safeguard the rights of craft groups which may, because of the 
nature of their work, be minorities in whatever plant their members may be 
employed. The present law dealing with the matter of appropriate bargain- 
ing units allows the commission to determine the suitable bargaining units 
which could be the employer unit, craft unit, plant unit, or subdivision 
thereof. Nothing in the Act compels them to designate craft units ev^en 
though a majority of such workers wish to be a separate unit. 



128 Joint Eeport of Executive Council and Officers 

House Bill No. 820 makes the designation of craft units mandatory, pro- 
viding a majority of a craft make such a selection. This amendment is 
already a part of the New York Labor Relations Act and is being sought by 
the American Federation of Labor as an amendment to the National Labor 
Relations Act. 

Burial Allowance for Fatally Injured Workmen 

(Petition of Senator Chester A. Dolan, Jr.) 

An Act to Provide That the Payment of Burial Expenses Shall Not Be De- 
ducted from Compensation Due Dependents In Fatal Injury Cases — 
Senate Bill No. 319. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives March 7, adopted by the Senate 
March 13 and signed by the Governor March 20. Now Chapter 81. 

Prior to the enactment of this amendment to the Workmen's Compensation 
Act, burial allowance for fatally injured workmen, which is limited to $150, 
was deducted from the amount payable to dependents. This change provides 
that the allowance of $150 continues, but that it cannot be deducted any 
longer from compensation due dependents. 

The State Federation supported this legislation, but filed a bill of a simi- 
lar character. Our proposed amendment provided for a burial allowance 
of $300 instead of $150. 



Workmen's Compensation for Those Employed in the Granite Industry 

(Petition of the Committee on Labor and Industries) 

An Act Providing Workmen's Compensation Benefits for Employees in the 
Granite Industry Contracting Silicosis and Other Occupational Pulmon- 
ary Dust Diseases — House Bill No. 2379. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives August 9, adopted by the Senate 
August 11 and signed by the Governor August 12. Now Chapter 465. 

Much consideration and study has been devoted to the serious question 
of providing workmen's compensation for workers in the granite industry. 
The unions involved have cooperated fully and worked very hard trying to 
find a means of protecting such workers who are susceptible to silicosis or 
other occupational pulmonary dust diseases by providing workmen's compen- 
sation benefits. 

For several years these workers have been without coverage under the 
Workmen's Compensation Act. Insurance companies take advantage of the 
present Act which, unfortunately, is not compulsory. They select their risks, 
issuing policies in cases only where profit is assured. In industries where 
risks may be greater, such as granite, they simply establish prohibitively 
high rates which make it impossible for some employers in a competitive 
business to buy coverage for their employees. Insurance interests claim 
they do not refuse to insure risks, but to raise rates beyond an employer's 
reach is exactly the same. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 129 

This bill is designed to keep the cost of workmen's compensation at 6 per 
cent of the payroll. To accomplish that, it was necessary to change the 
benefits to incapacitated workers, which was agreed upon by the groups 
of employers and employees involved. After a year's experience those in- 
terested in this matter will be better able to ascertain whether the cost is 
too high or benefits too small, or both. 

Among those who devoted much time and effort to this problem and 
who attended the hearings before various committees were Costanzo Pagnano 
of the Granite Cutters Union, Senator John D. Macakay of Quincy and 
others. 

Fair Competition for Bidders on Public Works Contracts 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Building and Construction 
Trades Council) 

An Act to Provide and Require Fair Competition for Bidders on the Con- 
struction, Reconstruction, Remodelling or Repair of Public Works by the 
Commonwealth or any Political Subdivision Thereof — Senate Bill No. 272. 
(Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2234). 

Adopted by the House of Representatives July 26, adopted by the Senate 
August 7 and signed by the Governor August 12. Now Chapter 480. 

This bill is aimed at certain unfair practices in which some building 
trades contractors have been indulging, namely the chiseling of sub-contrac- 
tors and others to whom work is sub-let by general contractors. It provides 
that all general contractors who seek public works contracts must give 
figures and prices of work to be sub-let. At present general contractors who 
successfully bid are free to sub-let certain work and are permitted in the ab- 
sence of any statutory prohibition to chisel sub-contractors down to a point 
below which the latter can operate profitably. In some instances sub-con- 
tractors have been obliged to force workers to accept less than the prevailing 
wage rate in order to make both ends meet, so to speak. The State Building 
and Construction Trades Council feels that this legislation will remove that 
evil. 

An interesting hearing was conducted at which both employers and em- 
ployees appeared in favor of this legislation. Among those who participated 
were Frank C. Burke, President, and James P. Meehan, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Massachusetts State Building and Construction Trades Council, and 
E. A. Johnson, Secretary of the Boston Building and Construction Trades 
Council, and many others. 

Raising the Compulsory School Age 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Further Limiting the Exemption Under the Compulsory School 
Attendance Law — ^ House Bill No. 317. (Subsequently substituted by 
House Bill No. 2459.) 

Adopted by the Senate August 10, adopted by the House of Representatives 
August 11 and signed by the Governor August 12. Now Chapter 461. 

At long last it appears as though the State Federation of Labor w'ill suc- 
ceed in having the compulsory school attendance age increased from 14 to 16 



130 Joint Report op Executive Council and Officers 

years. In recent years the only important opposition came from members of 
the clergy whose arguments were somewhat unsound and without too much 
reasoning, but nevertheless rather effective with our lawmakers. They have 
realized, however, that the Federal Wages and Hours Law prohibits the use 
of minors under the age of 16 in manufacturing establishments and mines, 
and that unions and some employers have been able to establish standards or 
policies of not employing boys and girls younger than 16. In short, the prob- 
lem of child labor in Massachusetts is not the same as it was several years 
ago. Today there are fewer children under 16 being employed. 

Representative Ralph V. Clampit of Springfield, House Chairman of the 
Committee on Education, should be given much credit for this long-delayed 
victory. For the past several years he has devoted considerable time and 
attention to this particular subject. His sincerity and cooperation in connec- 
tion with this bill are deeply appreciated. 

Changing the Hours of Beginning Employment from Five to Six o'clock 

in the Morning 

(Petition of the Consumers' League of Massachusetts) 
An Act Limiting the Hour of Beginning Work for Certain Minors — House 
Bill No. 1079. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives May 31, adopted by the Senate 
May 31 and signed by the Governor June 2. Now Chapter 255. 

Due to inconsistencies in the labor laws, the employment of boys under 
18 or girls under 21 at five o'clock in the morning was possible in many occu- 
pations even though women over 21 could not begin work before six o'clock. 
House Bill No. 1079 brings Section 66 of Chapter 149 of the General Laws 
into line with the prevailing hour of six o'clock in the morning as the be- 
ginning hour for most employment. 

Supervision of Special and Chartered Buses by 
Department of Public Utilities 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 
An Act to Place Special and Chartered Buses Under the Supervision of the 
Department of Public Utilities — House Bill No. 1568. (Subsequently 
substituted by House Bill No. 2386.) 

Adopted by the Senate July 24, adopted by the House of Representatives 
July 27 and signed by the Governor August 3. Now Chapter 404. 

Many small bus companies have been created in recent years to compete 
with firms that have operated for many years. These so-called special or 
chartered bus businesses are not supervised by the Department of Public 
Utilities and are therefore able to avoid certain requirements relative to 
suitable equipment, maintenance and insurance, all of which are important 
in the interest of public safety. 

Such firms, too, provide unfair competition. Wages paid are so low 
and other working conditions imposed upon the unorganized drivers so un- 
desirably to the advantage of these companies that the business of companies 
whose employees are thoroughly unionized and enjoying reasonable wages 
and working conditions, is impaired. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 131 

It is felt that this legislation will remove, to some extent, the unfaix- 
advantages these unrestricted firms have at present and will also provide 
the necessary supervision over their business to preserve and improve the 
safety of users of these buses. 

An interesting hearing was conducted, at which many representatives of 
various street carmen's unions appeared. Willis B. Downey, General Counsel 
of the Boston Elevated Railway, and other representatives of transporta- 
tion companies were also helpful with this legislation. 

Broadening the Scope of the Forty-Eight Hour Law for Women and Minors 

(Petition of the Consumers' League of Massachusetts) 

An Act Broadening the Scope of the Forty-Eight Hour Law, So-Called, for 
Women and Children in Industry — House Bill 1084. (Subsequently sub- 
stituted by House Bill No. 2450.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives July 17, adopted by the Senate 
July 17, and signed by the Governor July 20. Now Chapter 377. 

This legislation is a redraft of House 1084 which was introduced as a 
result of complaints from workers, labor officials and civic groups. Serious 
inadequacies were noted in the existing 48 hour law. For instance, there were 
many charges that girls were working 50, 60 and 70 hours a week in private 
clubs, letter shops and various offices. There were other complaints that 
workers in occupations covered under the existing 48 hour law were forced 
to divide their workday into two or three periods with long intervals between, 
thus making their time away from home excessively long. Many workers 
were working at such high speed that they did a day's work in four hours, 
then were sent home to rest for four hours and later forced to come back to do 
another day's work in four hours, giving them a day of 12 hours in and about 
their place of occupation. 

There was a great deal of undercover opposition to this bill and if it 
were not for the splendid work of Senators Skibinski and Cole in the Senate 
and Representatives Herter, Sirois, Kalus, Cutler, Cappucci and Craven in the 
House, the legislation would never have been passed. The Stenographers, 
Typists, Bookkeepers and Assistants Union No. 14965 joined with the State 
Federation of Labor and the Consumers' League in actively campaigning for 
the bill. 

As a result of these efforts, the benefits of the 48 hour law are extended 
to women in private clubs, offices, letter shops and financial institutions and 
all these under the 48 hour law are protected against split tricks. 

Extending the Lunch Hour Provision to Additional Women and Minors 

(Petition of the Consumers' Leagiie of Massachusetts) 

An Act Extending the Lunch Hour Provision — House Bill No. 1078. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives, June 7, adopted by the Senate 
June 8 and signed by the Governor June 12. Now Chapter 280. 

Until the passage of this legislation there was no requirement for a lunch 
period for women and minors in anything except factories or workshops 
where five or more persons were employed. This legislation provides for a 



132 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 



lunch hour for women and minors in mechanical and mercantile establish- 
ments and in all factories and workshops regardless of the number employed. 

Extending the Regulation of Employment of Minors 

(Petition of the Consumers' League of Massachusetts) 

An Act Designating the Age of Employment of Certain Additional Minors — 
House Bill No. 1083. (Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2353.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives June 5, adopted by the Senate June 
5 and signed by the Governor June 8. Now Chapter 273. 

Until this legislation was passed, children of any age could work around 
race tracks any number of hours a day. Such employment has a serious 
moral and physical hazard, yet neither police nor labor department inspectors 
could prevent it. By passage of this legislation, children under 14 cannot 
work in stables and children under sixteen may not work in stables or in pool 
or billiard rooms longer than eight hours a day and forty-eight hours a week. 

Reducing Hours of Employment for Certain Minors 

(Petition of the Consumers' League of Massachusetts) 

An Act Decreasing the Hours of Labor for Certain Minors — House Bill 
No. 1080. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives July 10, adopted by the Senate 
July 10 and signed by the Governor July 12. Now Chapter 348. 

Before the passage of this legislation boys 16 to 18 and girls 16 to 21 
could work ten hours a day and 54 hours a week if employed in a barber shop, 
bootblack stand, public stable, garage, brick or lumber yard, messenger office, 
construction or repair of buildings, or in any contract or wage-earning indus- 
try carried on in tenement or other houses, or in any radio broadcasting station 
except as talent. This legislation cuts the hours of work to 48 hours a week 
and nine hours a day and prevents split tricks. 

Commission on Apprenticeship Training 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act for the Continuance for an Additional Two Years of the Existence 
of the Commission on Apprenticeship Training in the Department of 
Labor and Industries — House Bill No. 733. 

Adopted by the House of Representatives June 20. 

It was necessary to file this legislation to extend the" apprentice training 
commission for another two years as the commission would have expired under 
the terms of the present law on December 31, 1939. 

Labor and industry, as well as lawmakers, agree that the functions of 
such a commission are worthwhile and considering the progress made by the 
present commission the Legislature deemed it advisable to continue this type 
of work within the Department of Labor and Industries. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 133 

Prohibition of Split Trick Employment for Minors Under Sixteen 

(Petition of the Consumers' League of Massachusetts) 

An Act Limiting the Hours of Work for Certain Minors — House Bill No. 
1081. (Subsequently substituted by Senate Bill No. 532.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives June 10, adopted by the Senate 
June 10, and signed by the Governor June 12. Now Chapter 352. 

This eliminates split tricks in the employment of minors under 16. 
Under this legislation employers will be unable to work young people at 
top speed for a few hours and then send them home to rest, only to come 
back to finish a day's work. 

Promotion of Drawtenders in Accordance with Length of Service 

(Petition of Francis F. Morse) 

An Act Regulating Promotions in Drawtending Service — Senate Bill No. 74. 
(Subsequently made part of House Bill No. 2576.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives August 12, adopted by the Senate 
August 12 and signed by the Governor August 12. Now Chapter 506. 

For a number of years the Bridge Tenders Union of Boston has endeav- 
ored to have promotions within the drawtending service made on a basis of 
seniority, rather than political. Many first and second assistant drawtenders 
who are qualified in all respects for promotion, especially years of service, 
are disregarded because they are not "in." If this measure, which is now 
part of House Bill No, 2276, is enacted due consideration will have to be 
given to years of service when promotions are made. 

Frank F. Morse, Secretary-Treasurer of the Bridge Tenders Union, and 
others who have fought for this measure against all sort of obstacles deserve 
much credit. 

BILLS OPPOSED BY LABOR AND DEFEATED 

Compulsory Mediation of Labor Disputes 

(Petition of Ralph H. Cahouet) 

An Act Providing for the Mediation of Industrial Disputes Arising in the 
Industry of Transporting Propei'ty for Hire by Motor Vehicles in the 
Commonwealth — House Bill No, 1926. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 8 and rejected by the Senate 
May 17. 

After being decisively rejected during last year's session of the Legis- 
lature, Attorney Ralph H. Cahouet, representative of employers in the trans- 
portation industry, made another attempt to have this measure enacted into 
law this year. The bill provides for compulsory mediation of differences 
between employer and employee in the transportation industry, regardless 
of whether such differences are minor grievances or vvages and conditions 
of employment. 



134 Joint Report op Executive Council and Officers 



Under the terms of this proposed bill, all matters between employer and 
employee that are not agreed upon during negotiations would be referred to 
a board of mediation. While the board would have the points in dispute^ 
under consideration, unions and their members would be obliged to tolerate 
any conditions imposed upon them by their employer. There would be no 
recourse. Employees could not strike, even against unbearable working con- 
ditions or oppressive wages, until at least one week after the board of medi- 
ation made known its findings. Should the workers decide to cease work 
in protest against undesirable working conditions prior to the board's deci- 
sion, they would be in violation of the law and be subject to a fine of from 
$10 to $50 each for every day they participated in the strike. 

Trade unionists must give serious consideration to this sort of legisla- 
tion. Though this particular measure is aimed at teamsters* unions through- 
out Massachusetts, it could conceivably apply to any other groups in the 
transportation field, even if they are not drivers of trucks. And, too, if 
such a law were enacted, little time would elapse before other employers 
would try their luck at "hamstringing" Labor. We need only look to other 
parts of the country to satisfy ourselves that employers and their powerful 
organizations are hard at work trying to throttle and eliminate the value 
and effectiveness of trade unions. During recent months laws have been 
passed in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, which in effect 
will retard, if not eliminate, trade unionism. Compulsory mediation has been 
imposed. Picketing has been limited, and under certain circumstances pro- 
hibited. Changes have been legislated to allow employers to charge labor 
representatives with interference, coercion and intimidation in the course of 
organization campaigns. 

Legislative action in other states curbing trade unions is not coincidental. 
It is the retaliatory tactics of employers who have been unsuccessful over the 
years in their attempt to wipe out the idea of industrial democracy through 
trade unionism. 

We should be proud of our alert and cohesive labor movement in Massa- 
chusetts. Through the united efforts of teamsters' unions and our hundreds 
of other interested affiliates, this measure was rejected. It is gratifying 
indeed to observe that when our fundamental and constitutional rights are 
at stake, the thousands of members of the Massachusets State Federation of 
Labor join as one and say "no." 

Sales Tax 

(Petition of Henry F. Long, Commissioner of Corporations and Taxation) 

An Act Providing for Payment of An Excise by Vendors of Tangible Personal 
Property and a Compensating Tax, and Establishing a Welfare Fund and 
Providing for Crediting the Proceeds of Certain Taxes Thereto and for 
Disposition Thereof — House Bill No. 34, 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 11. 

This measure to establish a two per cent retail sales tax commanded much 
attention during this session. Its main support came from Commissioner 
Henry F. Long of the Department of Corporations and Taxation, the Massa- 
chusetts Federation of Taxpayers and Mayor Maurice J. Tobin of Boston, as 



Massachusetts State Federation op^ Labor 135 

well as mayors of several other cities. Anions the many organizations opposed 
to the bill was the State Fedei'ation of Labor. 

The Gardner Auditorium, State House, was filled to capacity for several 
days during' which time spokesmen for and against the measure were heard. 
The well-known group of real estate barons were on hand to express their 
support of the measure, hoping that they might shift their tax load to wage 
earners and unemployed citizens by way of a retail sales tax. Since the hear- 
ing several other tax proposals have been recommended and considered, includ- 
ing an additional tax on gasoline and cigarettes, a reduction of the income 
tax exemption with an increase of tax on the remaining taxable income, to- 
gether with a tax increase on liquor and dog track receipts and surtax. 

Those acquainted with the strategy used on Beacon Hill have been aware 
that Republican leaders have been holding the 2 per cent retail sales tax bill 
in abeyance, waiting for prorogation when the measure could be "jammed" 
through by its advocates, when lawmakers were weary and anxious to return 
home. 

The Federation of Labor has consistently opposed this type of taxation. 
It is an imposition upon those least able to pay. The ordinary worker already 
pays substantial taxes, visible and invisible, and should not be forced to take 
on this new form of taxation which would be permanent. 

Proponents of the bill realized soon after the hearing that the bill would 
have a stormy course and therefore suggested certain changes by exempting 
necessities of life, medicine and a few other commodities. They hoped that 
such a modified retail sales tax measure might quiet some of the opposition 
which was heard and displayed at the hearing, and since. It also appeared as 
though the strategists were trying to enter into a "deal" by having the leader- 
ship of the Republican and Democratic parties agree to passage of the measure 
without a roll call vote. This was frustrated when more than 30 members of 
the House of Representatives indicated that they would insist that the vote 
be taken by the call of the ayes and nays. 

Wage earners throughout the Commonwealth, whether organized or not, 
should realize that the opposition of the State Federation of Labor to this 
measure has prevented the enactment of this proposal up to the present time. 

Abolition of Labor Relations Commission 

(Recommendation of His Excellency, Governor Leverett Saltonstall) 

Recommendation That the Labor Relations Commission Be Abolished and Its 
Duties Be Transferred to the Commissioner of Labor and Industries 
and the Courts — contained in House Bill No. 2121. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 12. 

Soon after becoming Governor of the Commonwealth, Leverett Salton- 
stall made many recommendations for economy (House Bill No. 2121). With 
the best wishes of the Massachusetts Federation of Taxpayers, he recom- 
mended that the State Labor Relations Commission be abolished and that 
its various duties be transferred to the Commissioner of Labor and Industries 
and the courts. 



136 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Although the Governor clahned it was a recommendation in the interest 
of economy, obviously the recommendation to give part of the Act to the 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries and the remainder to the courts vv^as 
an attempt to do w^hat employers have wanted done from the commission's 
inception — wreck or otherwise render ineffective Labor's Bill of Rights. 

Since the time of making the proposal, he or his legislative leaders 
have changed his mind to some extent. At present the union-wrecking "and 
the courts" part of his recommendation has been dropped. Republican lead- 
ers then tried but failed to design a bill to meet the Governor's request and 
at the same time not offend the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor, 
the organization responsible for the enactment of the law in 1937. Some 
call it "trying to carry water on both shoulders." 

Abolition of State Teachers Colleges 

(Recommendation of His Excellency, Governor Leverett Saltonstall) 

Recommendation to Eliminate the State Teachers Colleges Located at Hyannis, 
Springfield, North Adams, and Worcester — contained in House Bill No. 
2121. (Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2428.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives July 25 and rejected by the Senate 
July 27. 

Among other recommendations for economy made by Governor Saltonstall 
during the early months of his administration was the proposal to abolish 
certain teachers colleges. This particular recommendation again caused the 
Gardner Auditorium to be filled to capacity by those from the communities 
which would be affected and also by those who have attended or desire to 
attend these state-supported institutions of learning. Besides the Governor's 
cheer leader, Norman MacDonald, there were few who cared to come forth in 
favor of closing these colleges which afford an opportunity for many tu 
obtain a college education at a moderate cost. 

The Ways and Means Committee finally recommended that a recess com- 
mission be established to study the matter of closing these colleges which was 
adopted by the House. It can be expected that the commission will make its 
report to the 1941 session of the Legislature with recommendations. 

Bill to Prohibit the Sale of Liquor on Sunday 

(Petition of Henry K. Sherrill and Others) 

An Act to Prohibit the Sale of Alcoholic Beverages on the Lord's Day — 
Senate Bill No. 233. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 11. 

Although this measure had very little chance of passage, it required the 
constant attention of those who obviously would be adversely affected by 
the prohibition of liquor sales on the Lord's Day. Very little support was 
given to the measure except by a remote few who seem to think that those 
who desire a "short one" should abstain on Sundays. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor V.il 



BILLS FAVORED BY LABOR AND DEFEATED 

State Fund — Workmen's Compensation 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Providing for a State Fund for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to Replace the Present Workmen's Compensation Law — House Bill No. 
1863. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 2 and rejected by the Senate 
May 9. 

This year's fight brought us closer to establishing a state fund for work- 
men's compensation. Since 1931 the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
has been unable to procure a roll call vote in the House of Representatives 
on this important measure, mainly due to the influence of insurance interests. 
They realize that measures of importance to Labor must be roll called at 
every stage if such legislative proposals are to be enacted into law. They 
also realize that a roll call vote provides a permanent record of how each 
lawmaker voted. Some Representatives who enjoy the friendship of Labor 
are also chummy with the insurance interests. Without a roll call vote Labor 
cannot ascertain whether its "friends" voted for or against the measure. 
Then, too, the absence of a roll call is all that insurance lobbyists want. No 
roll call vote is their best guarantee that the bill will not pass. 

But this year, both the insurance interests and some of Labor's "friendly" 
Representatives met with a surprise. Two roll call votes were taken. On 
reconsideration the motion prevailed, 111 to 103, but on the question of sub- 
stituting the Federation's bill for the Committee on Constitutional Law's 
adverse report, we were defeated 99 to 110. At least the margin is nar- 
rowing, and with united support from labor unions throughout the Common- 
wealth in the future, there is a reasonable chance of creating a state fund 
for workmen's compensation. 

Insurance spokesmen have constantly argued that a compulsory act, 
such as our proposal is, would be unconstitutional. But recently the question 
was put to Attorney-General Dever by the Committee on Labor and Industry. 
He ruled that a compulsory act would be constitutional. 

We must realize that the federal and state governments provide benefits 
for our aged, our unemployed and our injured workmen. The federal gov- 
ernment, through the Social Security Act, provides benefits for the aged 
and unemployed — without profit. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, hoAV- 
ever, provides a system of paying benefits to injured workmen — but allows 
insurance companies to do the underwriting and reap lucrative profits. 

How much longer we shall permit insurance companies to charge em- 
ployers more than they should pay for insuring their workmen and also, 
derive profit at the expense of injured workmen, who otherwise would receive 
more generous benefits, depends upon workers themselves. I earnestly rec- 
ommend that an intensive campaign be launched in which every local union 
and every member participate in an effort to bring this contest between 
Labor and the insurance interests to an end — ^by the establishment of a state 
fund for workmen's compensation. 



138 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Representative Carl A. Woekel of Methuen led the Federation's fight 
for the bill in the House of Representatives, assisted by Representative Harry 
Kalus of Boston, while Representatives Albert L. Bourgeois of Lowell and 
Charles J. Innes, Jr., of Boston carried the torch for our opponents. 

In the Senate the measure was rejected, 19 to 13, on roll call. The 
fight in that branch was led by Senator Chester T. Skibinski, who was sup- 
ported by Senator Chester A. Dolan, Jr., while Senator Joseph F. Francis 
related the arguments against the measure so often used by insurance 
spokesmen before the committees that have considered the bill. 

To a large degree the progress made this year is attributable to the 
splendid assistance rendered by trade unionists throughout the Common- 
wealth. It was indeed gratifying to note the response to my request for 
last-minute assistance while the measure was in the House of Representatives. 

State Wages and Hours Law 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Promote the General Welfare and to Protect the Health, Safety, 
Morals, and Standard of Living of the People of the Commonwealth by 
Providing for the Elimination of Deti'imental Wage and Hour Standards; 
to Prescribe the Powers and Duties of the Department of Labor and 
Industries Under the Act, and for Other Purposes — Senate Bill No. 147. 
(Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2456.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives July 27 and rejected by the Senate 
August 1. 

The American Federation of Labor recommended that its various state 
branches introduce State Wages and Hours Bills in their respective states to 
supplement the Federal Wages and Hours Law, which only assumes juris- 
diction over businesses engaged in interstate commerce. Without a state act, 
employees of hotels, restaurants, laundries and other local service businesses 
are without a law providing for a minimum wage or maximum workweek. 

Originally the State Federation of Labor's proposed bill provided for 
a minimum wage of 35 cents per hour, to be increased to 45 cents during a 
two-year period. It also provided for a maximum work week of 42 hours in 
accordance with the provisions of the Federal Act, which reduces the national 
workweek to 42 hours on October 24 of this year. After one year the work- 
week would have been reduced to 40 hours. The substitute bill (House Bill 
No. 2456) provides a minimum wage of 30 cents per hour and a maximum 
workweek of 48 hours. It would establish a new division within the Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industries under the supervision of the Commission and 
provide, as the present Minimum Wage Law does, for wage boards to study 
the various industries and make wage and hour recommendations. 

Probably no measure filed by the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
has ever met with as much opposition as this bill. Every selfish group of 
employers, large and small, from the Cape to the Berkshires, either attended 
or sent high-paid "stooges" to express their opposition at the four-day hearing 
conducted in the Gardner Auditorium, State House. Each group professed 
to be in favor of decent wages and a reasonable workweek provided they were 
exempt. It will be recalled that these groups are the same ones that have 
always tried to block Labor's long march in the direction of increased wages 
and reduced hours of employment. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 139 

The bill was reported favoiably by the Committee on Labor and Indus- 
tries but met with the usual fate when it reached the Committee on Ways 
and Means. The latter committee recommended that a resolve be adopted 
providing for a two-year study of the subject. In the House of Representa- 
tives a vigorous fight was conducted, led by Representatives William H. 
Haskell, Harry Kalus, John M. Cawley, and Morris Kritzman. Those who 
opposed the bill and favored Ways and Means Committee's recommendation 
for a study were Representatives Albert Bergeron, John W. Vaughan and 
Joseph L. Whiton. On roll call the resolve was substituted 116 to 104. Another 
attempt was made in the House to revive the bill by substituting it for the 
resolve, but substitution was rejected, 117 to 104. 

Peaceful Persuasion Act 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Further Define the Acts Relative to Peaceful Persuasion and In- 
junctions in Labor Disputes and to Make Impossible the Emasculation and 
Nullification of Said Acts and for Certain Other Purposes — Senate Bill 
No. 142. (Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2451.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives July 31 and rejected by the Senate 
August 1. 

This measure was considered one of the most important and necessary 
legislative proposals on Beacon Hill this year. This bill must eventually be 
enacted into law if unions and their representatives throughout the Common- 
wealth are to be allowed to distribute literature in connection with organiza- 
tion campaigns and to picket peacefully without interference from certain 
local police officers. It must also be enacted if the Anti-Injunction Act of 1935 
is to be of any value, since the Massachusetts Supreme Court has made it 
plain that the Act is meaningless and of no value. (Details regarding the 
Supreme Court's decisions and other information relative to injunctions can 
be found on page 179). 

Although it is our contention that the United States Supreme Court in 
several of its recent decisions legalized the distribution of literature and picket- 
ing for most any purpose, throughout the Commonwealth cities and towns 
continue to enforce ordinances and by-laws prohibiting the distribution of 
literature and the displaying of placards during the course of labor disputes, 
and also apply anti-loitering ordinances to picketing during labor disputes. 

In very strong language Governor Saltonstall recommended that an ade- 
quate peaceful persuasion act be enacted during this session of the Legisla- 
ture and also recommended that the anti-injunction act be studied and changed, 
if necessary, so that its intent would not be nullified. Either his recommenda- 
tions were hollow gestures or members of his party prefer not to respect his 
recommendations, particularly when they may involve the betterment of 
Labor, because the Committee on Judiciary has voted against Senate Bill No, 
142. Representative Philip Sherman endeavored to design a compromise 
bill which would change the definition of a "labor dispute," and, in effect, would 
permit picketing and peaceful persuasion under certain circumstances not 
now considered as legal by the Supreme Court of Massachusetts. Even this 
measure was rejected in the House of Representatives and the Senate, 
notwithstanding the Governor's recommendation. 



140 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Compulsory Workmen's Compensation Act 

(Petition of the Departmeyit of Industrial Accidents) 

An Act Making Workmen's Compensation Insurance Compulsory Upon Em- 
ployers Instead of Elective as Heretofore — ^House Bill No. 42. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 4. 

The present Workmen's Compensation Act is elective. Employers are 
not obliged under the terms of the Act to provide coverage for their employ- 
ees. Of course workers have the right in the absence of such coverage to sue 
at common law, but experience has shown that compulsory workmen's com- 
pensation would be the best means of giving benefits to workmen injured on 
their jobs. The State Federation of Labor believes this to be true and also 
feels that the Commonwealth should take over the entire business of insuring 
workmen in the industrial accident field. Until our State Fund is enacted 
into law, however, it is advisable that the present Act be made compulsory, 
so that every employee is afforded some protection, little as it may be under 
the private insurance company-operated system. 

This measure met with considerable opposition, especially from promoters 
of various "schemes" that are being sold to employers as a substitution for 
workmen's compensation. They propose an ambiguous compulsory act which 
contains among other things, self -insurance. 

Child Labor Amendment 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

Resolution Ratifying the Proposed Amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States Relative to the Labor of Persons Under Eighteen Years 
of Age— House Bill No. 315. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives February 20 and rejected by the 
Senate February 27. 

The proposed amendment to the Constitution to grant Congress the right 
to curb the use of child labor on a national basis has been approved by 
twenty-eight states. Thirty-six are required to affirm the amendment before 
it becomes a part of the Constitution. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
considered by many throughout the nation as a progressive state and a leader 
in progressive legislation, continues to reject the proposed amendment. But 
despite this reputation, Massachusetts not only refuses to join with other 
states to stamp out the use of child labor nationally, but has consistently 
rejected the State Federation of Labor's proposal to raise the compulsory 
school age from fourteen to sixteen years. 

The question of whether the fight to ratify the child labor amendment 
is to continue has been decided by the United States Supreme Court. Be- 
fore that tribunal were two appeals, one from Kansas and the other from 
Kentucky. The questions determined were whether the proposed amendment 
was still properly before the several states after having been submitted in 
1924, and whether a state could ratify the amendment after having previ- 
ously rejected it. The high court said yes. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 141 

Many loyal supporters of the State Federation's proposal to ratify the 
amendment were present at the hearing as usual. Labor representatives from 
every section of the Commonwealth were in attendance to assist. Their 
interest and support is sincerely appreciated. 

In the House of Representatives a lively fight was waged to overturn 
the Committee on Constitutional Law's adverse report. Representative Adolph 
Johnson of Brockton, who filed the legislative petition for the State Federa- 
tion of Labor, was at his best. And with the aid of Representatives Morris 
Kritzman of Boston and Leslie B. Cutler of Needham, the members heard 
an interesting and intelligent debate on the subject. Those who opposed 
ratification on the floor of the House were Representatives Charles J. Innes 
of Boston, H. Edward Snow of Natick, and Albert L. Bourgeois of Lowell. 
The latter member seems to be a new recruit for those who oppose Labor 
"regardless." Nevertheless, a roll call vote was obtained for future reference. 
The vote was 13 to 195. 

In the Senate, the attempt to upset the Committee's report was led by 
Senator Chester T. Skibinski. Regardless of opposition, even from the 
clergy, he fights valiantly for the worthwhile proposition to end the use of 
child labor in America. 

Regulation of Private Employment Offices 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Providing for the Regulation of Private Employment Offices — House 
Bill No. 337. (Subsequently substituted by House Bill 2224.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives June 20. 

Private employment offices will continue to operate in Massachusetts in 
the same undesirable way as in the past years. The Legislature, fully aware 
of the need for proper regulation, again rejected our measure which would 
provide for licensing and supervising fee-charging employment agencies by 
the Department of Labor and Industries. 

It is noteworthy that the bill was defeated by a Legislature which this 
year was overwhelmingly Republican, although in the platform of the Repub- 
lican Party which was designed and adopted last fall, can be found the fol- 
lowing plank: 

"We demand the enactment of legislation for the rigid regulation of pri- 
vate employment agencies." 

Nevertheless, Representative Philip M. Markley of Springfield fought 
vigouously in the House of Representatives, but without the support of those 
who "demanded" the enactment of such legislation, defeat was inevitable. 

Election of Judges 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

Proposal for a Legislative Amendment of the Constitution to Provide for the 
Election of Judges by the People — House Bill No. 1035. 

Rejected by the Senate April 17. 

The State Federation of Labor's proposal for an amendment of the Con- 
stitution to provide for election of judges was rejected again this year. But 
despite being set back again, much new interest and support has developed. 



142 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Many lawyers as well as large numbers of laymen who are not members of 
Labor are vigorous in their support of our proposed method of selecting 
judges. 

A careful perusal of court decisions over the years reveals rather vividly 
the need of a more democratic method of choosing those in charge of metering 
out "justice for all." Labor's memory is not too short or limited. Most trade 
unionists can remember when employers simply marched into court and after 
ex parte hearings obtained injunctions and restraining orders of a most 
vicious variety. Today Labor is still confronted with the situation of "em- 
ployers marching in," but fortunately our representatives can be heard, which 
can be considered as progress. 

Probably the best definition of a judge in Massachusetts is that he is 
a lawyer who once knew a governor. To change this condition so a judge 
may understand the people and their problems and needs, rather than just 
being acquainted with a governor, may require a constitutional convention. 
This should be explored and considered very carefully. 

Inclusion of Employers of One or More Employees Under the 
Unemployment Compensation Act 

(Petition of the MassachtLsetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Extending Jurisdiction of the Unemployment Compensation Act to 
Employers of One or More Employees — Senate Bill No. 150. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 11. 

Originally, the Unemployment Compensation Act assumed jurisdiction 
over employers of eight or more. Last year the Act was amended to include 
employers of four or more. The latter amendment went into effect January 1, 
1939. 

No sound argument can be advanced against this measure which would 
give coverage to all workers in Massachusetts. Representatives of the Divi- 
sion of Unemployment Compensation claim it would seriously affect their 
bookkeeping and impair the operation of the system. Needless to say, many 
administrative organizations get "uppish" when suggestions are made that 
might increase their work and responsibility. 

There is no argument against the fact that an idle worker formerly 
employed by a firm not subject to the Act gets just as hungry and otherwise 
in need as the worker whose former employer is subject to the Act. All em- 
ployers should be included and all workers should be entitled to unemployment 
compensation when out of work. 

If the present situation is allowed to continue employers of four and five 
may soon find ways of carrying on their businesses with three employees, and 
in that way save the 2.7 per cent payroll tax. Such a situation would impose 
an undeserved penalty upon contractors, for example, who operate with a suffi- 
cient number of employees to be subject to the Act, giving a competitor a 2.7 
per cent advantage on all work obtained by bids. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 143 

Elimination of the Waiting Period Under the Unemployment 
Compensation Act 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Eliminate the So-Called "Waiting Period" In the Payment of Unem- 
ployment Compensation — Senate Bill No. 149. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 11. 

At present an idle worker must wait two consecutive weeks before he is 
entitled to unemployment compensation benefits, and then after the third week 
of waiting he receives his check for one week. This proposed amendment 
would eliminate the waiting period and allow those eligible for benefits to col- 
lect after the first week of unemployment. 

The Advisory Council of the Division of Unemployment Compensation 
has regommended the continuance of the two-week waiting period, but that it 
not necessarily be served consecutively. The Council's proposed amendment 
would take effect April 1, 1940. 

A two-week waiting period is too long. Low-paid workers should not have 
to wait two weeks to become eligible for benefits and then wait another week 
before the first check is forthcoming. Expenses of individuals, whether unem- 
ployed or not, continue on. The landlord and grocery man may be sympa- 
thetic, but not to the extent of being reluctant about asking for their money. 

Those who are unfortunate enough to lose their jobs because of circum- 
stances over which they have no control should be allowed benefits immediately 
after registering as unemployed and available for work. 

Time Lost During Certain Labor Disputes to Be Credited to Workers 
Eligible for Unemployment Compensation 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Providing for Credit for Waiting Period In Certain Cases — Senate 
Bill No. 317. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 11. 

Attention has been called to a condition which sometimes exists immedi- 
ately after the termination of a labor dispute, especially a dispute for which 
the union or workers involved were not responsible. Not all employees return 
to woi"k immediately after a labor dispute ends. Some are required to wait 
until certain operations or processes are performed in order to provide them 
with work. 

If the labor dispute was actually a lockout by an employer or the workers 
were obliged to strike to enforce a labor board's decision, for example, there 
is no reason why the time during the dispute when the workers were idle 
should not be covmted toward the necessary two-week waiting period required 
under the Unemployment Compensation Act. Especially so if it is determined 
that the action of an employer was responsible for the stoppage of work. 

This measure would benefit those who do not return to work immedi- 
ately after a labor dispute, and would make them eligible for benefits imme- 
diately, provided the dispute lasted at least as long as the required waiting 
period. 



144 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Payment of Union Dues Not to Render Worker Ineligible for 
Unemployment Compensation During Labor Dispute 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 
An Act Providing for Benefits in Certain Cases — Senate Bill No. 316. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives August 11 and rejected by the 
Senate August 11. 

Under the present law a vi^orker is ineligible for unemployment compensa- 
tion if he is participating in or financing or directly interested in a labor dis- 
pute which causes stoppage of work. iSome trade unionists may be temporarily 
idle because of a labor dispute, but may not actually be on strike or involved 
directly in the dispute. The law now provides and rulings have been rendered 
that a worker who is a member of and pays dues to a union engaged in a 
labor dispute, even though he is not personally involved, cannot collect benefits 
from the Division of Unemployment Compensation. 

The proposed amendment provides that the payment of regular union dues 
or assessments shall not be construed as financing a labor dispute, thus such 
workers would qualify for benefits if eligible in all other respects. 

Readjustment of Legislators Salaries 

(Petition of Representative Roland D. Sawyer) 

An Act to Establish the Salaries of the Members of the General Court Under 
the Biennial System — House Bill No. 761. (Subsequently substituted by 
House Bill No. 2571.) 

Adopted by the House of Representatives August 10, adopted by the Senate 
August 12 and vetoed by the Governor August 12. Veto overridden by 
the House of Representatives August 12 and sustained by the Senate 
August 12. 

Labor was most vigorously in favor of the re-establishment of salaries 
for members of the Senate and the House of Representatives. Under the 
system of annual sessions of the Legislature lawmakers were paid $2000 per 
year, plus travel, and therefore it was necessary to consider the matter of 
re-establishing their salaries under the biennial system which was adopted 
at the last state election. 

The Massachusetts Federation of Taxpayers of course opposed this pi'o- 
posal, claiming that such a re-adjustment would actually be a wage increase 
and too costly to the taxpayers. 

Labor realizes that state Senators and Representatives are more than 
just lawmakers. They work for their constituents not only at the occupation 
of lawmaking during sessions of the Legislature, but are actually business 
agents, serving citizens of their respective districts in most every conceiv- 
able capacity. As one lawmaker put it, "I have done everything for my 
constituents except take care of their babies while they attend theatres." If 
the salary remained at $2000, which would be for two years instead of one, 
it would actually mean that members of the Legislature would be accepting 
a 50 per cent reduction of wages. Many members rely entirely upon the 
salary received as a legislator. If a readjustment of their wages is not made, 



Massachusetts State Federation of LAnf)R 145 

Labor can look forward to a time in the near future when the oidinary worker 
who cannot afford to hold such an office without an adequate salary will be 
virtually barred from sitting as a member of the Legislature. Only those 
who have independent incomes and other businesses, to whom $2000 would 
probably mean little, would be among those making our laws of the future. 
This bill provided for a salary of $3000 per term, which would include two 
years. 

After being "tabled" in the Senate or held as a blackjack over the heads 
of some Senators who needed their salaries readjusted but who were not in 
line with the administration's economy and tax program, a substitute bill 
providing for a salary of $3000 for each term (two years) was passed by the 
Senate and the House of Representatives — only to be vetoed by Governor 
Saltonstall. The House overrode the veto but the Senate failed to do so, thus 
establishing the salary at $2000 for two years. 

Bill To Repeal Teachers' Oath Law 

(Petition of the State Branch of the American Federation of Teachers) 

An Act to Repeal the Teachers' Oath Law, So-Called — ^Senate Bill No. 300. 
Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 258.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives February 16. 

It was expected that the fight to repeal the so-called teachers' loyalty 
oath law would be crowned by success during this session. Proponents of 
repeal had reason to be optimistic. With the House of Representatives and 
the Senate more predominantly Republican than it has been in several years, 
and with a Republican Governor who claimed he would sign the repeal bill 
if it reached his desk, advocates of repeal had high hope for victory. 

But to their surprise the House of Representatives rejected the Com- 
mittee on Education's recommendation for repeal, thus preventing the measure 
from being acted upon by the Senate or from being sent to the Governor for 
approval. 

Burial Allowance for Fatally Injured Workmen 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Increase the Amount Allowed for Burial of a Person Injured in 
an Industrial Accident — ^House Bill No. 1644. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 22. 

At present the Workmen's Compensation Act provides for an allowance 
of an amount not to exceed $150 toward the burial of a fatally injured work- 
man. If the workman leaves dependents, weekly benefits are provided, the 
maximum compensable amount being $6400. Until the law was changed dur- 
ing this session, the $150 burial allowance was deducted from the amount to 
which dependents were entitled. Chapter 81, enacted as a result of a petition 
filed by Senator Dolan, provides that the burial allowance no longer be 
deducted from the dependents' benefits. 

This petition, however, would increase the burial allowance from $150 
to $300. It is accepted that the proposed increase should be allowed in ac- 
cordance with Chapter 81, not to be deducted from dependents' benefits. 



146 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

It was felt that the increased amount of burial allowance would serve 
two worthy purposes. It would allow $300 for burial cost, which is little 
enough for a decent funeral these days; and it would correct at least par- 
tially an injustice which has existed for some time. At present, fatally 
injured workmen who have no dependents are entitled to nothing more than 
the statutory allowance of $150 for burial. If the burial costs more, the 
balance must be made up by parents or from personal funds, rather than 
by insurance companies giving coverage to industry in which the workman 
lost his life. In other words, a single man with no financial reserve and 
no life insurance, who is fatally injured at his work, can be buried at the 
expense of the insurer, if the cost does not exceed $150. If it does, the addi- 
tional expense must be met by parents or friends, even though the workman 
literally gave his life to industry. 

Labor Representation on Public Utilities Commission 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act Providing for the More Representative Character of the Membership 
of the Department of Public Utilities — House Bill No. 767. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives February 21. 

Again this year the Committee on State Administration reported this 
measure favorably. In the House of Representatives it reached the third 
reading stage and was defeated, despite the efforts of Representatives Daniel 
J. Bresnahan of Springfield and Frederick B. Willis of Saugus, who fought 
vigorously for its passage. Opposing them as usual, was Representative John 
W. Lasell of Northbridge, who leads the league of those who oppose wage 
earners "regardless." 

Supervision of Linemen, Cable Splicers, Metermen, Etc. 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor and the 
Massachusetts State Association of Electrical Workers) 

An Act Relative to the Supervision of Linemen, Cable Splicers, Metermen, 
Operators and Station Electricians — House Bill No. 681. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives April 10 and rejected by the Senate 
April 13. 

Though this measure is an excellent means of minimizing fatalities and 
hazards in the power industry by licensing and supervising those engaged at 
the occupation of lineman and cable splicer, as well as metermen, operators 
and station electrician, it meets defeat each year because of one reason — 
the influence of the power interests on Beacon Hill. 

An analysis of the power interests' opposition is interesting. The admin- 
istration of the law would cost the Commonwealth nothing. On the contrary, 
the license fees receivable would doubtless make the law self-supporting and 
in addition provide some revenue for the general fund. It seems rather 
obvious, therefore, that the "interests" prefer to allow hazards to continue 
in the industry and unnecessary fatalities to occur because of inexperienced 
workmen being engaged. There can be no other conclusion. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 147 

Because of the prolonged illness of Charles D. Keaveney of the Brother- 
hood of Electrical Workers who has ably presented the proponent's case in 
past years, Walter J. Kenefick, also a representative of the International 
Brotherhood, conducted the hearing in a most competent manner. His enthu- 
siastic associates and supporters of the measure were at the hearing as usual. 
Among them were John F. O'Neil, Electrical Workers, No. 326 of Lawrence, 
and Stephen Sullivan, Electrical Workers of Lowell, and many others. 

It must be disappointing indeed to members of the State Association of 
Electrical Workers not to have a roll call vote of the measure in the House 
of Representatives, especially after having obtained pledges from far more 
Representatives than are required to stand for a roll call vote. But it must 
be remembered the power interests are well entrenched. 



Wage Adjustment for Employees of State Institutions 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Employees, Local 30, American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) 

An Act to Raise the Wages of Certain Employees of the Department of Men- 
tal Health— House Bill No. 991. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 11 and rejected by the Senate 
May 18. 

Attendants and other employees in the state mental health hospitals are 
among the lowest paid employees in the state service. Considering the type 
of work performed, it is almost unbelievable that some attendants receive 
as low as $10.35 per week and maintenance. Truly these workers can be 
classed as forgotten men. 

The proposed bill would establish a minimum wage of $14 per week, 
which is low enough. Unfortunately the proposal came at a time when 
economy was being advocated on all sides, making the task of establishing 
this minimum, although small, an impossibility, at least for this year. 

Benefits of Baby Wagner Act for State Employees 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Employees, Local 30, American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) 

An Act to Apply Benefits of an Act Known as the State Labor Relations Law 
to Employees of the State and Political Subdivisions thereof — House 
Bill No. 1129. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 4 and rejected by the Senate 
May 9. 

Although it has been emphasized by the posting of notices that state 
employees have the right to join a union, certain executives continue their 
indirect interference. Last year this amendment to the so-called Baby Wag- 
ner Act was proposed, broadening the scope of the Act to include and give 
protection to state and municipal employees, provided they joined a union 
which constitutionally prohibited the use of a strike so far as government 
employees were concerned. 



148 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Members of the Committee on Public Service were sympathetic to the 
idea of retarding the efforts of department heads or other state executives, 
who may be continuing their interference with employees' rights to join a 
union, but still seemed uncertain as to how such legislation could be de- 
signed. Finally a compromise bill was drawn, even setting up a system 
of arbitration to handle grievances, which was offered in the House of Rep- 
resentatives by Representative Johnson of Brockton, but was rejected. 

Abolition of Split Shifts in State Institutions 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Employees, Local 30, American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) 

An Act Further Regulating the Hours of Labor of Certain Employees In the 
Commonwealth — House Bill No. 1272. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 1 and rejected by the Senate 

May 4. 

This much-needed legislation would abolish a most undesirable condition 
under which attendants and other employees at state mental hospitals are 
obliged to work. Although the present law confines the work week to 48 
hours, split shifts, so-called, are in effect in many institutions. Employees 
are forced to work their daily hours over a stretch that is arbitrarily im- 
posed. In many instances employees are required to be on and off duty 
for 16 hours before their eight hours are completed. This system oftentimes 
deprives attendants and others of an afternoon and evening off. 

This amendment would have required that the work day be eight hours 
and that it be completed within ten consecutive hours. Legislators feel that 
such a practice could and should be inaugurated by the Department of Mental 
Health and its various hospital authorities. 

Additional Man on Semi-Trailer Truck Units 

(Petition of the Massachtisetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Provide for the Presence of an Additional Man Besides the Op- 
erator of any Semi-Trailer Unit or Truck Carrying Five Tons or More 
—House Bill No. 1327. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 2 and rejected by the Senate 
March 8. 

This measure was one in which teamsters' unions throughout the Com- 
monwealth are deeply interested. Truck drivers and their representatives 
appreciate fully the dangers and hazards connected with the operation of 
large trucks and semi-trailer units which are now used by motor truck op- 
erators. 

Semi-trailer units, or the type of truck known as ten-wheelers, are 
especially dangerous from the point of view of the one person who is obliged 
to take it over the highways and back into depots, which requires much skill. 
At times during the course of such manipulations, it is important for a driver 
to determine whether his path is clear, and whether his judgment is accurate. 
Hence, it is important that such large units be provided with an assistant 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 149 

to the driver in charge of such a vehicle. In the interest of safety, the 
assistant could serve as driver when fatigue overcomes the person in charge 
of the truck, and he would be of immeasurable assistance when such large 
units are backed into, or otherwise brought to a terminal. 

During the course of the hearing, teamsters' local unions from all sec- 
tions of the Commonwealth were well represented and a most interesting and 
impressive case was presented before the Committee on Highways. 

Sick Leave for Employees of State Institutions 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Employees, Local 30, American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) 

An Act Requiring the Department of Mental Health to Grant Sick Leave With 
Pay to Employees Thereof — House Bill No. 1273. (Subsequently sub- 
stituted by House Bill No. 244.3.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives Julj' 10. 

Originally, the bill filed by Local 30 provided a 15-day sick leave with 
pay for employees of state mental health institutions. This group of workers 
seem to have been completely overlooked by administrators of the Common- 
wealth's affair. Their wages are sinfully low; their hours of employment, 
although limited to 48 per week, are spread out so that such workers are 
practically on call at all times; and many are not given sick leave. 

The Committee on Wa3's and Means recommended a measure authorizing 
and instructing the Commission on Administration and Finance to make rules 
and regulations, with the approval of the Governor and Council, regulating 
the granting of vacations, sick leaves, et cetra. But this measure, even though 
inadequate, was defeated in the House of Repi'esentatives. 

Appointment of Persons with Occupational Experience to Motor Truck 
Division, Department of Public Utilities 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Give Preference to Persons Having Occupational Experience In 
Making Appointments to the Motor Truck Division of the Department 
of Public Utilities— House Bill No. 1411. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives April 10 and rejected by the Sen- 
ate April 13. 

This measure was filed because of many appointments to the Motor Truck 
Division, Department of Public Utilities, being made in the past with no 
regard to occupational experience or qualification. Such appointees should 
be possessed with a general knowledge of the trucking and transportation 
industry and the problems and difficulties connected with the occupation of 
truck driver. 

Though this measure was rejected, some supporters feel that recent 
changes in the division may correct the condition which prompted the filing 
of this proposed legislation. 



150 Joint Report op Executive Council and Officers 

Weekly Pensions for State and Municipal Employees 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Further Define the Act Relative to Contributory Pensions for State 
and Municipal Employees and to Make Benefits Payments Weekly — Sen- 
ate Bill No. 166. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives April 24 and rejected by the Sen- 
ate April 27. 

Pensions for retired state and municipal employees are computed and 
paid on a monthly basis. This proposed amendment would provide w^eeldy 
payments if a pensioner so elected. Opposition from those in charge of 
administration who claimed such a change would entail bookkeeping com- 
plications, together with little interest on the part of beneficiaries of the 
pension system, were reasons for the rejection of the measure. 

Licensing of Automobile Mechanics 

(Petition of the International Association of Machinists, Lodge No. 264) 

An Act to Provide for Registration and Licensing of Motor Vehicles and 
Aircraft Mechanics — House Bill No. 1710. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 21 and rejected by the Sen- 
ate March 27. 

Most drivers of automobiles can cite instances of where their cars have 
been repaired by incompetent and inexperienced mechanics. Oftentimes faulty 
diagnosis of mechanical troubles result in much inconvenience to a motorist 
and, too, frequently contributes to serious accidents. 

Upon the theory that motorists are entitled to first-class repair work 
and in the interest of safety on our highways automobile mechanics should 
be competent and experienced, this legislation was filed. It provides for a 
board to license and supervise the occupations of automobile and aircraft 
mechanics. Though it would be self-supporting, it came at a time when 
Governor Saltonstall was recommending the abolition and consolidation of 
existing boards. 

Elimination of Liability of Mortgagors of Real Estate 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Protect Mortgagors of Real Estate from Unconscionable Deficiency 
Judgments after Long Periods of Time and for Certain Other Purposes 
—House 1017. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives February 20 and rejected by the 
Senate February 27. 

Attention has been called to an interesting feature in connection with 
transferring mortgages that may be held by a bank or other financial insti- 
tution on parcels of property, especially homesteads. 

Original mortgages oftentimes have a provision tucked into them, pro- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Lauor 151 

viding that such original owners of property might be held responsible for 
the payment of a mortgage if defaulted by the subsequent owner. An ex- 
treme illustration has been given revealing that a home-owner of 20 years 
ago, whose property may have changed hands several times during the elapsed 
time, could be held responsible for non-payment, even though he in no way 
was involved in the present-day default. 

The measure seems to be worthwhile and banks and other financial in- 
stitutions of course do not intend to allow even innocent mortgagors to be 
relieved of the financial liability that in no way is theirs. 

Licensing of Operators of Refrigerating Apparatus and Internal 
Combustion Engines 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Branch, International Union of 
Operating Engineers) 

An Act to Provide That Persons in Chai'ge of Refrigerating Apparatus and 
Internal Combustion Engines of Twenty-Five Horse Power or More Shall 
Be Licensed — ^Senate Bill No. 186. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 15 and rejected by the 
Senate March 22. 

Lawmakers continue to disregard the impressive arguments in favor of 
this legislation. Apparently they lose sight of the most important fact that 
this bill is needed very much in the interest of public safety. Nevertheless, 
both branches of the Legislature again rejected it this year. 

Regulating the Hours of Barber Shops 

(Petition of the Journeymen and Master Barbers State Association) 

An Act to Provide That Cities and Towns Be Authorized to Prescribe the 
Hours During Which Barber Shops and Beauty Parlors May Be Kept 
Open— House Bill No. 1268. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 9 and rejected by the Senate 
March 16. 

This bill would give cities and towns the right to adopt ordinances or 
by-laws regulating the hours during which barber shops could be open to 
conduct their business. Such permissive legislature is necessary if the 
hours of barber shops are to be regulated, because of the recent opinion of 
the Massachusetts Supreme Court to the effect that the Legislature has no 
right to enact such legislation. 

Under the terms of this measure 80 per cent of the barbers of a city 
or town would have to petition for the regulatory ordinance or by-law before 
city or town governments could consider the matter. 

Several other measures of interest to barbers were considered and re- 
jected by the Legislature this year, including House Bill No. 1267, a bill to 
provide annual registration of barber shops; House Bill No. 1703 and 1704, 
which related to and regulated the operation of so-called barbers' schools 
and barbers' colleges; and House Bill No. 1825, which would further define 
the word "barber." 



152 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Appointment of Qualified Members to Board of Registration of Barbers 

(Petition of the Journeymen and Master Barbers Association) 

An Act Providing for Legislation to Change the Qualifications Required for 
Appointment to the Board of Registration of Barbers and Relative to the 
Practicing of Barbering — House Bill No. 1266. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 9 and rejected by the Senate 
March 16. 

This legislative proposal contains several much-needed amendments to 
the law relative to the Board of Registration of Barbers. Among them is the 
provision that members of the board mvist have had five years' experience as 
a barber prior to their appointment to the board, and also that one member of 
the board shall be an employing barber and one a journeyman barber. The 
latter proposed change w^ould provide balanced representation which, since 
the inception of the board, has not been the case. 

Other amendments provide that no signs could be displayed which tend 
to mislead the public as to the services to be rendered in any shop; and 
that no registered barber could open a shop unless he had been a registered 
barber one year prior to opening such shop. 

Bill to Regulate the Installation of Fuel Oil Burners 

(Petition of Representative Francis X. Coyne) 

An Act Relative to Regulation by the Department of Public Safety of In- 
stallation and Servicing of Fuel Oil Burners — House Bill No. 650. (Sub- 
sequently substituted by House Bill No. 2082.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives May 15. 

This measure was designed to pi-ovide adequate supervision over the 
installation and servicing of fuel oil burners. The Committee on Military 
Affairs and Public Safety recommended a resolve providing for a study of 
this matter, together with the subject matter contained in several other bills 
before that committee. But it never survived the Ways and Means Committee, 
being rejected by the House upon recommendation of the latter committee. 

Licensing of Cooks and Regulation of Commercial Cookery 

(Petition of the Cooks and Pastry Cooks Association, Local No. 186) 

An Act to Establish a Board of Registration of Cooks and to Regulate the 
Practice and Occupation of Commercial Cookery — House Bill No. 1550. 
(Subsequently substituted by House Bill No. 2320.) 

Rejected by the House of Representatives June 13. 

This measure was intended to establish standards of competency and skill 
among cooks, chefs and others who prepare foodstuffs for public consump- 
tion. The Committee on State Administration was apparently impressed by 
the arguments offered in favor of the bill by Joseph Stefani, Business Agent 
of the Cooks and Pastry Cooks Association No. 186, and other supporters. 



I 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 153 



The committet! designed a modified bill providing for the registration and 
licensing of persons working at or desirous of entering the occupation of 
cooking. 

But again the Ways and Means Committee placed its stamp of disap- 
proval on a measure supported by the Federation which caused the measure 
to be defeated. 

Water-Tight bulkheads and Lifeboats on Fishing Boats 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor) 

An Act to Require Installation of Water-Tight Bulkheads and Lifeboats on 
Certain Fishing Vessels — House Bill No. 1682. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives April 10 and rejected by the Senate 
April 13. 

Officials of the fishermen's unions have been ti-ying for some time to 
provide adequate protection for those who work on fishing vessels. Many 
boats are equipped with faulty lifeboats and are seriously in need of water- 
tight bulkheads. If the loss of life in this industry is to be reduced, if not 
eliminated, every possible protection must be given to those who engage in 
this dangerous occupation. This measure would, in the opinion of those who 
need siich protection, properly require that water-tight bulkheads and suit- 
able lifeboats be provided on fishing vessels sailing from Massachusetts ports. 

Saturday Half Holiday for Drawbridge Employees 

(Petition of the Bridge Tenders Union, Boston) 

An Act Providing Saturday Half Holidays for Drawbridge Employees of the 
Department of Public Works — House Bill No. 482. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives March 28 and rejected by the 
Senate April 3 

Those employed in the drawtending service are required to work seven 
days each week, presumably because of the contention that the nature of their 
work requires them to be on duty at all times. This measure would have 
provided for a half-holiday each week. No good reason can be given for not 
granting such an improvement of working conditions since those working in 
other public services which are also required to be constantly available for 
public convenience are enjoying shorter workweeks. 

Fabrication of Freestone or Limestone Used by the Commonwealth by 
Residents of the Commonwealth 

(Petition of the Massachusetts State Building and Construction 
Trades Council) 

An Act Relative to the Awarding of Contracts for Public Work Requiring 
the Use of Freestone or Limestone — Senate Bill No. 271. 

Rejected by the House of Representatives April 6 and rejected by the Senate 
April 13. 

In connection vdth the use of freestone or limestone by the Commonwealth 
or by contractors doing work for the Commonwealth, such stone is fabricated 



154 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

in states where the pui'chase is made. The purpose of this measure was to 
provide a stipulation that the fabrication of freestone or limestone be done 
by citizens of the United States who are residents of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

Nevertheless, members of the committee on State Adnxinistration, as well 
as members of both branches of the Legislature, disagree with this reasonable 
proposal of confining as much state money as possible to having work done 
by our own residents. 

Conclusion 

The Federation continues to have many friends in the Senate and House 
of Representatives. Unfortunately, however, there are some who "go back 
home" with good scores who cannot be found when Labor seeks a sufficient 
number of lawmakers to stand for roll calls. This type of "friend" is also 
"chummy" with many of our adversaries and vote with us only when caught 
on roll call, but give no support whatever to our measures or to our efforts 
to obtain a record vote. 

I withhold making legislative recommendations as there is no session 
in 1940. It seems advisable that your Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent 
and Executive Council for the ensuing year go over this matter and give seri- 
ous consideration to the needs of our members and other wage earners 
throughout Massachusetts with respect to legislation and report to the 55th 
annual convention with specific recommendations. 

I conclude this report with a deep feeling of appreciation for the splendid 
support and cooperation extended by officers and members of our hundreds 
of local unions throughout the Commonwealth. Much of the Federation's suc- 
cess is attributable to their interest and assistance. 

It has been a pleasure to have served with President Morrissey and 
members of the Executive Council. The harmonious atmosphere and their 
willingness to cooperate has made my work somewhat easier, and also is 
responsible for much of the Federation's progress. 

Commissioner James T. Moriarty has continued to display his devotion 
to the cause of Massachusetts wage earners. He has been very helpful to 
the officers and members of the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor, for 
which I am sincerely grateful. 

I express my thanks and appreciation for the splendid cooperation and 
assistance given by Agnes T. Kane in connection with the many arduous duties 
of my office, and to Esther F. Cahill for her assistance and helpfulness dur- 
ing the course of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, ^ 




Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 155 



AFFILIATIONS 

During- the year several campaigns were conducted throughout the Com- 
monwealth in an effort to induce unaffiliated local unions to become part of the 
State Federation of Labor. In the various districts Vice-Presidents attended 
and spoke before meeting's of unions not yet attached to the State Federation, 
urging them to join with the hundreds of others that have been responsible 
for the prog'ress and expansion of the organization. 

At Regional Conferences the value of joining the State Federation was 
stressed. It has been the custom to invite all unions to attend and take part 
in our confei'ences, whether affiliated or not, and in most instances unattached 
locals have been impressed by the work being done. Their representatives 
usually returned to their respective local unions and urged that application 
be made for membership in the State Federation. 

It is pleasing to report that our efforts have resulted in 84 new affiliations. 
The records reveal that the number of locals suspended has decreased, and that 
fewer locals have had their charters revoked which, of course, means auto- 
matic suspension from the State Federation. The total number of unions sus- 
pended because of non-payment of per capita, or revocation of charters by their 
parent bodies decreased to the smallest number in several years. The number 
of local unions dropped, including those that withdrew, was 37. 

The State Federation of Labor is now made up of 631 per capita paying 
local unions, all of which are active. Those in arrears at the end of the fiscal 
year are mostly all in good standing at present. 

It cannot be stressed too forcefully that our goal will not be attained until 
every local union in Massachusetts affiliated with the American Federation of 
Labor directly or through their respective national or international unions is 
a part of this state organization. Your officers are fully aware of the fact 
that some of those still outside the fold have no intention of joining. Others 
may not understand or know of the splendid work the State Federation carries 
on. And there may be some that simply prefer to enjoy the benefits of an 
active and powerful state organization, but do not see fit to share in the 
expense. 

Delegates in attendance at the 54th annual convention should pledge them- 
selves to return to their respective localities and urge, through personal con- 
tact, all unaffiliated local unions to join. This sort of cooperation is most help- 
ful and usually results in new affiliations. Most of us know of at least one 
union that is not affiliated, and if each representative at this convention would 
lend his support to the campaign for a 100 per cent State Federation the time 
would not be too distant when even the hesitant groups would be affiliated and 
enjoying the benefits of membership in the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor. 

The new affiliations are: 



DISTRICT I 

Laundry Workers No. 66, Boston 

Railway Carmen No. 232, Boston 

Building Service Employees No. 30, Boston 

Food Service Sales and Chauffeurs No. 646, Boston 



156 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

American Federation of Government Employees No. 463, Boston 

Meat Cutters Union No. 618, Boston 

Boilermakers Union No. 281, Boston 

Sprinkler Fitters Union No. 669, Boston 

Window Cleaners Union No. 86, Boston 

Federal Labor Union No. 21789, Boston 

Machinists Union No. 301, Boston 

Sheet Metal Workers No. 395, Boston 

Theatrical Wardrobe Attendants Union No. 17329, Boston 

Operating Engineers Union No. 74, Boston 

Automobile Salesmen's Union No. 1474, Boston 

Street Carmen's Union No. 1141, Revere 

Retail Clerks Union No. 1445, Boston 

Federal Labor Union No. 21962, Boston 

Federal Labor Union No. 21097, Boston 

Sea Food Workers Union, No. 1572-2, Boston 

Wallpaper Workers No. 6, Chelsea 

Paper Workers No. 230, Boston 

Seafarers International Union, Boston 

Teamsters Union No. 203, Boston 



DISTRICT II 

Building Laborers Union No. 610, Fall River 

Molders Union No. 334, Framingham 

Textile Material Shippers and Clerks No. 21493, Fall River 

Plumbers Union No. 135, Fall River 

Meat Cutters Union No. 294, Quincy 

Meat Cutters Union No. 343, Framingham 

Railway Clerks No. 2011, New Bedford 

Central Labor Union, Taunton 

Machinists Union No. 1359, Attleboro 

Fire Fighters Union No. 144, Brockton 

Silver Workers Union No. 53, Attleboro 

Tool and Die Makers Union No. 1175, Attleboro 

Paper Makers Union No. 200, Fall River 

Lathers Union No. 139, Fall River 

Printing Pressmen's Union No. 96, New Bedford 

Motor Coach Operators No. 373, Dedham 

Retail Clerks Union No. 1458, Norwood 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees No. 161, Brockton 



DISTRICT III 

Federal Labor Union No. 21903, Watertown 
Garage Mechanics Union No. 1271, Lawrence 
Sea Food Workers Union No. 1572-1, Gloucester 
Meat Cutters Union No. 71, Lynn 
Bookbinders Union No. 139, Lowell 
Hat Workers Union No. 72, Haverhill 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 157 

State Hospital Employees No. 174, Danvers 
Retail Clerks Union No. 1435, Lynn 
Federal Labor Union No. 21803, Gloucester 
Pattern Makers Association, Lynn 
Street Carmen's Union No. 1153, Maiden 
Retail Clerks Union No. 232, Lawrence 
Retail Clerks Union No. 372, Lowell 
Federal Labor Union No. 21989, Cambridge 
Shellfish Workers No. 21956, Essex 
Granite Cutters, Gloucester 
Carpenters Union 1210, Salem 
Federal Labor Union No. 21721, Watertown 



DISTRICT IV 

Paper Makers Union No. 372, Fitchburg 

Central Labor Union, Leominster 

Bakery & Confectionery Workers Union No. 380, Worcester 

Barbers Union No. 144, Milford 

Plumbers and Steamfitters Union No. 92, Fitchburg 

Building Service Employees Union No. 179, Worcester 

Moving Picture Operators No. 723, Milford 

Barbers Union No. 994, Gardner 

Bakery & Confectionery Workers Union No. 133, Worcester 



DISTRICT V 

Painters Union No. 389, Amherst 

Electrical Workers No. 161, Greenfield 

United Garment Workers Union No. 153, Springfield 

Musicians Union No. 91, Westfield 

Granite Cutters, Chester 

Paper Makers Union No. 171, Turners Falls 

Lathers Union No. 25, Springfield 

Iron Molders Union No. 167, Springfield 

Street Carmen's Union No. 496, Pittsfield 

Painters Union No. 614, Westboro 

Carpenters Union No. 549, Greenfield 

Plumbers and Steamfitters Union No. 297, Pittsfield 

Retail Clerks Union No. 1459, Springfield 

Teachers Union No. 470, Northfield 

Letter Carriers Union No. 1614, Turners Falls 



PER CAPITA TAX 

Considerable thought has been given to the matter of revenue during the 
past year, as well as to the expenses of operating the Massachusetts State 
Federation of Labor. The Executive Council is pleased to report that the 
financial condition continues to be excellent. 



158 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

The State Federation of Labor now comprises more than 600 local unions 
in Massachusetts, a greater numbe\' than ever before in our history. There 
remain many unions, however, that do not see fit to become a part of the or- 
ganization; they seem to assume an attitude that they can obtain and enjoy 
the benefits of a powerful State Federation without belonging or contributing 
to its operating expense. 

Delegates are doubtless aware that the cost of being affiliated with the 
State Federation amounts to only one and one-half cents per member per 
month, with no initiation fee required. Many State Federations throughout 
the nation operate with a much higher cost to its affiliated local unions, in some 
instances per capita cost is five cents per member. 

The Executive Council feels that the time is not too far away when the 
facilities of our headquarters and an increase of personnel may be necessary, 
but feels that such an undertaking should not be seriously considered unless 
the revenue would permit. 

There are many local unions, small in size, that are affiliated with the 
State Federation, a good number of which are paying on memberships of from 
25 to 50. The monthly income from these locals is approximately 35 to 75 
cents. 

Without any financial hardship it is felt that a minimum charge ■ should 
be made, assessing unions now paying on memberships of 66 or less, one dollar 
per month, instead of one and one-half cents per month for each member. 
Such a constitutional change, in the opinion of the Executive Council, would 
increase our revenue considerably and start the organization in the direction 
of expansion, when such is required, on a more sound financial basis. Most 
delegates will agree that a minimum cost of one dollar per month is not un- 
reasonable. Such a change will not only increase our revenue, but will also 
simplify to a great extent the office bookkeeping. In addition, the minimum 
of one dollar will meet the cost of postage and printing connected with servic- 
ing small unions, which this present per capita payment does not do. All will 
have to agree that affiliation with the State Federation of Labor was never 
intended at less than cost. No local union would want to pay less than its 
share. Yet the cost of postage and printing of proceedings and the literature, 
on a per capita basis, exceeds in many instances the per capita received from 
some of the smaller local unions whose members are serviced, and will continue 
to be, the same as our larger affiliates. 

Accordingly, the Executive Council unanimously recommends the consti- 
tution be amended to provide for a minimum assessment of one dollar, as 
follows : 

Amend Section I of Article VIII by inserting after the word "standing" 
on line six, the following: "provided that the minimum amount to be paid by 
local unions shall not be less than one dollar per month," so as to read: 



ARTICLE VIII— REVENUES 

Section 1. The revenues of the State Federation shall be derived from 
local unions, which shall pay into the treasury of the Federation a per capita 
of one and one-half cents per month for each member in good standing, pro- 
vided that the minimum amount to be paid by local unions shall not be less 
than one dollar per month, the same to be payable to the Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent of the State Federation. He shall deposit in some bank, 



Massachusetts State Federation of^ Labor 159 

approved by the Council, all sums in excess of fifty dollars, and shall submit 
to all affiliated organizations a full financial report quarterly. It is further 
provided that each central body shall pay fifteen dollars per annum in quar- 
terly payments. 

CONVENTIONS 

The Executive Council has given much consideration during the year to 
the question of where future conventions w^ill be held. Our rapid and constant 
expansion in terms of affiliated unions and members creates a possibility that 
the cities in which conventions have been held in past years are somewhat 
limited because of inadequate hotel facilities, and in some instances because 
of both inadequate hotel facilities and lack of suitable meeting places. By 
authority of the Executive Council, President Morrissey appointed a commit- 
tee of members. of the Council to study the problem. 

The committee, after considering the matter, reported to the Council, and 
the following propositions are unanimously referred to the delegates to the 
54th annual convention: 

1. It appears that, in view of the expansion of the State Federation of 
Labor and the constantly increasing number of delegates at the annual con- 
vention, many cities in which conventions have been held in past years may 
not be suitable because of lack of adequate hotel accommodations and inade- 
quate meeting places. There is a strong feeling that only three cities are 
equipped with necessary convention accommodations, Boston, Springfield, and 
Worcester. 

2. If there are but three cities in which the convention can be held, the 
situation is one that presents several problems, which will have to be solved 
within the next year or two. Can the Federation expect each of the three 
cities to accept the convention by rotation, or, in other words, have the conven- 
tion every third year? This seems to be a reasonable question that requires 
an answer. 

3. The Executive Council is of the opinion that if the foregoing are 
accepted facts, a committee representing the State Federation of Labor should 
be appointed to meet jointly with committees representing the Central Labor 
Unions of Boston, Springfield and Worcester, in an effort to make arrange- 
ments suitable to the four organizations involved, and thus allow the Executive 
Council to make specific recommendations to the 55th annual convention. 

REPORT OF WILLIAM P. CONNERY, JR., MEMORIAL FUND 

COMMITTEE 

Your committee, which was appointed to raise funds for an appropriate 
memorial in memory of the late Congressman William P. Connery, Jr., hereby 
makes its final report, with certain recommendations for the disbursement of 
the fund. Originally, a committee was appointed by former President John F. 
Gatelee as a result of action taken at the 52nd annual convention. During the 
following year local unions and some international unions contributed a total 
of $1,528.20. 

At the 53rd annual convention the committee recommended that the cam- 
paign be continued. The convention adopted the committee's report and the 
same committee was reappointed by President Morrissey. 



160 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

During the past year every local union not having made a contribution 
was contacted several times. Communications were also sent to unaffiliated 
local unions, urging them to contribute if they saw fit. Approximately 1000 
unions were called upon to make donations, but only 42 responded this year. 
In addition, four national unions made donations, making a total of $487.62 
for the year. 

The committee feels it has done everything possible to obtain contributions 
from Massachusetts trade unions for the purpose for which it was created, but 
regrets exceedingly that the total sum collected during the course of the past 
two years is insignificant compared to the proposed memorial suggested by 
those who enthusiastically supported the movement on behalf of Labor's 
staunch friend, Billy Connery. Your committee sincerely hopes that the serv- 
ices of real friends will, in the future, remain a part of our memory longer 
than the deeds of Billy Connery, whose untimely death was due at least in part 
to his constant and energetic fight for the wage earners of America. 

Since it appears that many local unions do not intend to contribute to this 
fund and that no more revenue is forthcoming the delegates should consider 
the matter of how the money on hand should be disposed of. 

Some advocates of the fund originally felt that a monument should be 
erected by the Massachusetts State Federation of Labor in memory of Billy 
Connery. Unfortunately, the amount collected will not permit the carrying 
out of such an idea, even if it were the will of the convention. The total sum 
available, after all expenses were paid, is $1,895.92. 

Your committee respectfully suggests the following plans for the consid- 
eration of the delegates to the 54th annual convention: 

1. That consideration be given to providing a perpetual plaque in 
memory of the late William P. Connery, Jr., to be placed in a public building, 
if possible, within the Congressional District which he so well represented; or 

2. Turn the fund over to the widow of our late friend, William P. 
Connery, Jr. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MATTHEW P. MANEY (Chairman), Lawrence 
NICHOLAS P. MORRISSEY, Boston 
MICHAEL J. O'HARE, Somerville 
ANTHONY J. DeANDRADE, Boston 
CHARLES M. ERWIN, Lowell 
CHARLES E. CAFFREY, Springfield 
FRANCIS M. CURRAN, Holyoke 
LEO BARBER, Lynn 
KENNETH I. TAYLOR, Treasurer 

CONTRIBUTIONS TO WILLIAM P. CONNERY, JR., MEMORIAL FUND 

(Since the 53rd Annual Convention) 

Name Amount Name Amount 

Electrical Workers, No. 326, Law- Bookbinders International Union, 

rence $67.00 Wasliington, D. C 50.00 

American Wire Weavers, Belleville, Cooks and Waiters Union, No. 201, 

New Jersey 10.00 Haverhill 5.00 

rnrnentprsi ITninn No 1566 Law- Street Carmen's Union, No. 280, Lowell 10.00 

CarpenierS IjniOn, SSO. IODO, l^aW \W :\ r,^^tf^^ Wiro Woniroro Aa«r.,ii- 



rence 5.00 



W. J. Duffy, Wire Weavers Associ- 

^ ,^ ^ ^„„ ation, Cleveland, Ohio 10.00 

Charles D. Keaveney, Lynn 10.00 Extract Maimers, No. 20931, Boston.. 5.00 

Waitresses Union, No. 112, Boston.. 5.00 Boston Central Labor Union 50.00 

Wire Weavers Association, Cleve- Fruit and Vegetable Distributors 

land, Ohio 5.00 Union, No. 20588. Boston 5.00 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 161 



Name Amount Name Amount 

KtuiiTal Labor Union, No. 20681, Federal Labor Union, No. 20943, 

Springfield .5.00 Springfield 5.00 

Machinists Union, No. 20, Salem 10.00 Bartenders Union, No. 100, New 

Electrical Workers Union, No. B1015, Bedford .'i.OO 

Lowell 5.00 I'attern Makers Association, Lynn . . lO.fK) 

Teamsters Union, No. 437, Haverhill 5.00 Machinists Union, No. 002, Boston.. 10.00 

I'ost Office Clerks, No. 360, Lawrence 37.00 Paper Makers Union, No. 171, Tur- 

Federal Labor Union, No. 21355, ners Falls 5.00 

East Weymouth 5.00 Electrical Workers Union, No. 223, 

Bnilding Laborers Union, No. 473, Brockton 2.00 

Pittsfield 5.00 Carpenters Union, No. 1531, Rock- 
Federal Labor Union, No. 21903, land 3.00 

Watertown 10.00 Barbers Union, No. 994, Gardner . . . 1.00 

Machinists Union, No. 301, Boston.. 5.00 Plumbers and Steamfltters Union. 

Bicycle Workers Union, No. 20291, No. 276, Brockton 1.00 

Westfield 10.00 Steamfltters Union, No. 499, Lowell 2.00 

Bni'.ding Service Employees, No. 30. Molders Union, No. 167, Springfield 2.'5.12 

Boston 2.00 Retail Clerks Union, No. 143.5, Lynn 10.00 

Letter Carriers Union, No. 929, Typographical Union, No. 13, Boston 2.5.00 

Hingham 3.,50 Railroad and Steamship Clerks. No. 

Silver Workers Union, No. 53, Attle- S99, Now Bedford 5.00 

boro 3.00 Typographic.Tl Union, No. 165, 

Molders Union, No. 39, Taunton 10.00 Worcester 5.00 

Roofers Union, No. .33, Boston 10.00 *Staire Employees TTnion. No. .596, 

Lowell Central Labor Union 10.00 Greenfield 2.00 

Plnmliers and Steamfitters Union, • 

No. 297. Pittsfield 1.00 Total .$487.62 

* Received after close of fii^cal .year. 



UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

Shortly after Leverett Saltonstall was inaugurated as Governor of the 
Commonwealth and soon after the 1939 session of the Legislature got under 
way, the Unemployment Compensation Commission was abolished and a Divi- 
sion of Unemployment Insurance created. In short, the administrative end 
of our unemployment insurance system was reorganized. 

Advocates of reorganization exclaimed that benefits to idle workers 
should be paid promptly, and to accomplish just that, as well as to otherwise 
have the administration of the law run smoothly, the reorganization proposal 
had to be enacted. But the "cure all" reorganization, nor the improved 
employment conditions, nor the lessons learned from the previous year's 
experience have produced the promised improvement in operations. More 
attention seems to have been given to devising ways to reduce employer 
contributions to the fund than to pay the benefit obligations promptly and 
in full to uneiriployed workers. 

Unemployment insurance can be paid on time. The experience of other 
New England states is evidence that the state pooled insurance against 
unemployment can promptly provide purchasing power during layoffs or shut- 
downs. Since the 53d annual convention reviewed the progress of this labor- 
sponsored program to sustain the purchasing power of workers during payless 
periods, much activity has occurred and some substantial progress has oc- 
curred. 

The special legislative investigation as to the methods of appointment 
of unemployment compensation personnel which created headline news before 
the primaries was virtually shelved during the election campaign. Presum- 
ably it had served its primary purpose and, as in the case of the hurricane 
relief appropriations, the willingness of the Republican machine to avoid any 
disturbing controversies with ex- Governor Hurley's supporters was probably 
a further factor in this policy. The fact that another legislative committee 



162 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

had been created as a recess study group to advise the incoming Legfislature 
as to any needed changes in unemployment compensation did not deter the 
first group from recommending a reorganization of the administrative setup 
as soon as Governor Saltonstall took office. 

The State Federation did not oppose the elimination of the Commission 
in favor of a Director, but it did ask that Labor be protected in the deter- 
mination of policy and in the processes of administration by the appointment 
of an Assistant or Deputy as a Labor Relations Representative. We urged 
that Commissioner James P, Meehan be appointed to that post. To sustain 
the one-third share enjoyed by Labor in the determinations of the Commis- 
sion, we also asked that the new Advisory Council be given the power and 
duty of passing upon appointments and upon any regulations or rules. Sev- 
eral other amendments were publicly offered by the Federation. 

According to newspaper reports and the confidential statements of com- 
mittee members, rejection of some of our proposals were said to be due to 
a veto by the Social Security Board which, under the federal law, is required 
to certify that the provisions of a state law are in accordance with its stand- 
ards or else to withhold the financial grants upon which the state adminis- 
tration of unemployment compensation depends. We were skeptical — and 
continue to be — of the accuracy of these statements because we believed that 
our amendments were entirely proper and constructive. We cannot help but 
criticize the methods of operation whereby state legislative committees invite 
Social Security representatives to private executive sessions instead of re- 
questing some public testimony at open hearings. We believe that any legiti- 
mate criticisms should be made publicly instead of in star chamber sessions. 
When we saw Social Security Board representatives closeting themselves with 
the legislative committee or in the Governor's office, we asked the regional 
office of the Board for some statement as to the Board's position, and when 
the Regional Director explained that he could not divulge such information 
we telephoned the office of the chairman of the Board in Washington. We 
were told that the Board felt obliged to refer such questions to the state 
officials. 

While we honestly doubt that the Social Security Board opposed the 
Federation's amendments, we must criticize the unrealistic sense of obligation 
which the Board seems to have toward state administrations and Legislatures. 
The public has a right to know what opinions or criticisms are given at 
Beacon Hill as to pending legislation. We believe also that the Social Se- 
curity Board does itself a disservice by exposing itself to misrepresentation by 
newspaper writers or committee members by putting itself on the receiving 
end of buck-passing, however unbelievable and objectionable some of the 
stories may be. 

However, some of our recommendations were accepted by the Legisla- 
ture with the apparent blessing of the Social Security Board. After signing 
the bill. Governor Saltonstall named Fred Graham to serve as Labor Relations 
Representative along with his existing duties as Director of the State Em- 
ployment service. The Governor's action, however, would seem to be an 
evasion of the Legislature's intent in creating the two specific positions and 
was a direct rejection of the State Federation's active sponsorship of former 
Senator James P. Meehan. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 103 

Also, the Governor disregarded the suggestions of the State Federation 
as to the Labor representatives on the Advisory Council and the membership 
of the Board of Review. His appointments are as follows: Director, J. Ed- 
win Doyle; Deputy Director, Robert E. Marshall; Assistant Directors, Fred J. 
Graham and William L. Williston. The Advisory Committee, Public Repre- 
sentatives, Arthur G. Rotch, Chairman, and Henry Cloutier; Employee Rep- 
resentatives, Daniel J. Boyle and Joseph J. Cabral; Employer Representa- 
tives, Willard Ormsbee and Royal Parkinson. The Board of Review, G. Wal- 
lace Tibbets, Chairman, Sybil H. Holmes and William H. Thornton. 

The State Federation has noted that the Advisory Council has sponsored 
a proposal to reduce the income of the Unemployment Compensation Fund 
and has apparently secured the co-operation of Representative McCormack 
of Boston in drafting an amendment to the Social Security Act to permit 
states to reduce employer contributions whenever the fund is above a stated 
figure. While the McCormack draft offsets this destructive arrangement 
by requiring the maintenance of benefit provisions which in important details 
exceed the Massachusetts formula, we note that the American Federation of 
Labor has denounced any such reduction in revenue at this time. It is en- 
couraging also to read that Chairman Altmeyer of the Social Security Board 
told the Senate Finance Committee that the Board is very doubtful of the 
wisdom of such a proposal. 

Other than this liberality to employers, the Advisory Council has been 
slow to devise a simplified liberalization of unemployment compensation. 
Anyone who has been following Labor legislation on Beacon Hill must have 
been mystified by the number and length of executive sessions conducted by 
the Committee on Labor and Industries jointly with the Advisory Council. As 
a result of the delays caused by the apparent indefiniteness of these huddles, 
and the shelving of the committee's first draft of general amendments, it 
became necessary around June 15 to extract the sections dealing with the 
suspension of employee contributions and press it for enactment before July 1 
when the 1 per cent payroll tax would otherwise be revived. 

The Advisory Council and the committee seem to have decided that the 
steady growth of the fund might be so reduced by lowering employer taxes 
and by a slight increase in benefit rates that some sharp business slump 
might cause so heavy a drain as to threaten the existence of the fund. 
Therefore, while proposing to substitute a meager fund, about 1^ times the 
highest annual income or outgo in place of the original conservative theory 
of accumulating in good times to cushion the shock of bad business conditions, 
employees would not have to contribute when employment conditions are 
good but would be required to adjust themselves to a 1 per cent tax at the 
time when jobs are scarce, earnings low, and purchasing power least able 
to shoulder a virtual wage cut. 

The State Federation of course opposed this proposal and was able to 
substitute outright repeal of employee contributions. Other details as to the 
legislative developments are to be found in the repoi-t of the Legislative 
Agent. 

In recounting the experiences of the past year, the State Federation must 
make it clear that these criticisms are directed against the failure of admin- 
istrative and legislative leaders to translate the vitally needed objectives into 
action. Our criticism indicates no lessening of our enthusiasm for community 



164 



Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 







Percentage of 




Total Funds 


Benefits to 




Available 


Total 


ifits Charged 


for Benefits 


Collections 


$1S,969,000- 


$19,044,000' 


42.3 


5,602,000 


2,469„00O 


09.4 


32,119,000 


56,841,000 


30.1 


3,120,000 


4,757,000 


39.6 


110,OTO,000 


149,675,000 


42.4 


84,718,000 


78,525,000 


51.9 


10,463,000 


6,964,000 


00.0 


1,024,000 


2,246,000 


31.3 



insurance against the hazards of unemployment! Even at its v^^orst, unem- 
ployment compensation has established an enviable record in contrast w^ith 
the shortcomings of the private insurance racket in industrial accidents. 

Northeastern State Unemployment Compensation Funds as of March 31, 1939 

Total 

Collections 

and Interest 

Connecticut $33,013,000 

Maine 8,071,000 

Massachusetts 88,960,000 

New Hampshire 7,877,000 

New York 259', 745,000 

Pennsylvania 163,243,000 

Rhode Island 17,427,000 

Vermont 3,270,000 

The State Federation again reminds every affiliated union that it should 
have an active Committee on Social Security to protect the interests of its 
members on all the programs established under the Federal program, includ- 
ing especially the provisions and procedures of the state unemployment com- 
pensation system. 

To quote from the paper presented at the New England Conference of 
American Federation of Labor unions in Boston on March 25th during the 
round table discussion on Social Security, Bernard Wiesman, of the Social 
Security Board's Labor Information Division, said: 

"We believe that local unions should take as much interest in 
the operation of Social Security as they v^^ould if it w^ere part of a 
contract negotiated with an employer. A dollar a day is the equiva- 
lent of ten, twenty, or thirty per cent of average daily earnings for 
many of your members. It justifies, and necessitates, your close at- 
tention. 

"State Unemployment Compensation, in some states, can sup- 
ply as much as $300 to the covered worker who suffers long periods 
of unemployment within a year. On a percentage basis it may be 
equally important to the man or woman who ordinarily is employed 
at low wages or for a relatively short working year. 

"The exact condition under which unemployment compensation 
is payable depends upon the terms of the state law and of the ad- 
ministrative regulations and procedures adopted thereunder. 

"Complaining about delay is a human trait, and sometimes com- 
plaints serve a useful purpose. Complaints, however, will serve to 
bring about an improvement only when fortified by intelligent, con- 
structive suggestions. Labor union officers should look upon the 
procedures and provisions of unemployment compensation laws as 
closely as if they were part of the provisions of a contract with 
employers. The cash value to their members is just as great as a 
wage increase, or a wage decrease, especially because the money is 
payable at the time when workers need it so severely." 

On July 1, the Railway Unemployment Insurance Act of 1938 became 
effective. Under this law employees subject to the Railway Retirement Act 
are transferred from state unemployment insurance coverage to the new fed- 
eral railway unemployment insurance system. The New England Regional 
office, with George H. Parker as director, is established at 150 Causeway 
Street, Boston. Local unions having members affected by this law may 
obtain complete information by writing to Mr. Parker's office. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 105 



SOCIAL SECURITY 

The Federal Social Security Act was adopted in August of 1935. Taxes 
for the old age insurance provisions began in January of 1937 and lump sum 
benefits to the family or estate of covered workers who died or to the worker 
who reached 65 after that date and before 1942 have been payable since that 
time. Under that law monthly retirement benefits were scheduled to begin 
in 1942 to workers becoming 65 after working in some part of five years from 
the first of 1937. 

The Board early in 1939 presented a number of recommendations for 
sweeping amendments, one of which would provide for monthly old age in- 
surance benefits in January 1940. The American Federation supported these 
amendments. 

The new amendments provide an old age insurance system, payable as a 
matter of right, but balanced to meet more fully the needs of the individual 
worker. The original act measured benefits only by previous earnings of the 
individual, although it did give a much larger return in proportion to those 
with small total earnings than to those regularly employed over a long period 
of time. Thus, the original act provided monthly retirement benefit of $15 to 
anyone meeting the minimum requirements who had earned $3000 in total 
wages. It provided $10 a month more for the next $12,000 in total wages; $25 
more for the next $30,000 in total wages, or a total of $50 a month for $45,000 
in total earnings. The maximum was set at $85 a month for $129,000 in total 
earnings. 

All of those monthly benefits were personal; in other words, if the worker 
died, no more monthly benefits were payable to his widow or dependents. 
Instead, a cash settlement was provided for. Under the old law no considera- 
tion was given for the additional responsibilities of a worker who had a wife 
and dependent children, or elderly parents depending upon him for support. 
From a community standpoint, the original old age insurance provisions 
were a tremendous advance over the conditions which previously existed. In 
adopting the law, the Congress specifically provided that the Social Security 
Board should study the operation of the law and make recommendations from 
time to time as to changes which it believes necessary or desirable. 

The Social Security Board conducted these studies. Likewise, a National 
Advisory Council of outstanding representatives of employers, employees and 
the public also made careful analysis of the situation. As a result, when the 
Congress assembled in January 1939, a number of specific recommendations 
as to changes in the Social Security Act were before it. Essentially, these 
changes sought to liberalize the provisions of the Act to meet the social 
obligations of the community toward the worker who has dependents and 
to the worker who is already along in years and who would have very little 
time in which to qualify under the original act. It also sought changes 
which would simplify the administration of the Act. 

The amendments provide that the eligible worker who retires will receive 
a monthly benefit based on his average annual earnings, plus an increase 
for the number of years in which he has been covered by the program and, 
in addition, an insurance equal to half of that amount on behalf of his wife 
if she, too, is 65 years of age or over. The provisions for a cash settlement, 
or lump sum payment, were substantially changed. No lump sum payment 



166 



Joint Report op Executive Council and Officers 



is made excepting in cases where there are no survivors entitled to monthly 
insurance. 

Survivors' insurance provides perhaps the outstanding expansion of the 
Social Security program. A w^orker covered by the program is given insur- 
ance protection for his wife and children in the event that he should die 
while the children are too young to take care of themselves. Each dependent 
child under 18 is entitled to this insurance along with the widow in whose 
care they are left. Insurance is payable to a widow with any child still under 
age until the youngest has reached age 16 or 18, if still in school. Likewise, 
insurance is payable to the widow at 65, or over, who survives a worker, 
whether employed or retired at the time of his death. Aged dependent 
parents are entitled to insurance if the worker is not survived by widow or 
children who are entitled to it. 

By means of the changes which have been proposed, it is expected that 
the insurance paid during the early years of the program will be very much 
greater than under the original law, but in the later years of the program 
the obligations incurred should be somewhat lower than those of the original 
bill because the present provision will eliminate many expensive small benefits 
to persons who qualified under the old law by very short periods of employ- 
ment in covered occupations. It might be said that the present law is framed 
to provide the greatest good for the greatest number. That is the objective 
of any true system of social insurance which is established to provide ade- 
quate community protection against the economic hazards which confront 
the multitudes of its individual citizens. 

To illustrate the provisions for old age retirement insurance we reprint 
the example as tabulated in House Report 728 based on the bill as adopted 
by the House of Representatives in June. 



Illustrated monthly old age insurance benefits under present plan and under 

revised planl 





Present 
plan 


Revised plan 


Present 
plan 


Revised plan 




Single 


Married^ 


Single 


Married^ 


Years of 
coverage : 

3 


Average monthly wage of $50 


Average monthly wage of $100 


(3) 

.$15.00 
22.50 
32.50 


$20.60 
21.00 
24.00 
28.00 


$30.90 
31.50 
36.00 
40.00 


(3) 

$17.50 
32.50 
51.25 


$25.75 
26.25 
30.00 
35.00 


$38.63 


5 


39.38 
45.00 
52.50 


20 


40 




Average monthly wage of $150 


Average monthly wage of $250 


3 


(3) 

$20.00 
42.50 
61.25 


$30.90 
31.50 
36.00 
42.00 


$46.35 
47.25 
54.00 
63.00' 


(3) 

$25.00 
56.25 
81.25 


$41.20 
42.00 ' 
48.00 
56.00 


$61.80 


5 


63.00 


40 


72.00 


20 


84.00 







1 It is assumed, with respect to the revised plan, that an individual earns at least 
.$200 in each year of coverage in order to be eligible to receive the 1 per cent incre- 
ment. If this were not the case, the ))eneflt would be somewhat lower. 

- Benefits for a married couple without children where wife is eligible for a sup- 
plement. 

3 Benefits not paid until after five years of coverage. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 



]01 



To explain the survivor benefits, we reprint the figures cited in the 
same source. 



Illustrative monthly survivor benefits^ 





One child 
or parent 
65 or over 


Widow, 65 
or over 


Widow 

and one 

child 


One child 
or parent 
65 or over 


Widow, 65 
or over 


Widow 

and one 

child 


Years of 


Average monthly wage of 
deceased, $50 


Average monthly wage of 
deceased, $100 


3 


$10.30 
10.50 
12.00 
14.00 


$15.45 
15.75 
18.00 
21.00 


$25.75 
26.25 
30.00 
35.00 


$12.88 
13.13 
15.00 
17.50 


$19.31 
19.69 
22.50 
26.25 


$32.19 


5 


32.S1 


20 


37.50 


40 


43.75 






Years of 


Average monthly wage of 
deceased, $50 


Average monthly wage of 
deceased, $2'50 


3 


$15.45 
15.75 
18.00 
21.00 


$23.18 
23.63 
27.00 
31.50 


$38.63 
39.38 
45.00 
52.50 


$20.60 
21.00 
24.00 
28.00 


$30.90 
31.50 
36.00 
42.00 


$51.50 


5 


52.50 


20 


60.00 


40 


70.00 







b 



1 It is assumed that an individual earns at least $200 in each year of coverage. If 
this were not the case, the benefit would be somewhat lower. 

The amendments also provide for skipping the tax rate rise scheduled 
for 1940 so that the rates would remain the same until 1943. Another im- 
portant change is that wages earned in covered jobs after a person reaches 
65 will be taxed and counted towards benefits. 

Many important changes are also proposed in respect to unemployment 
compensation, old age assistance and aid to dependent children, all of which 
deserve careful attention by local union committees on social security. 

The State Federation and affiliated central labor unions and local unions 
which have established these committees to advise and assist members have 
found their work greatly assisted by the Labor Information Division of the 
Social Security Board which is headed by M. H. Hedges, Research Director of 
the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and which is represented 
in the New England Regional office by Bernard Wiesman who is available 
to any union officer or member for information and advice on social security 
questions. The State Federation has gladly cooperated in the Division's 
work which has done so much to promote an understanding of rules and 
procedure between the Board and Organized Labor. 



REGIONAL CONFERENCES 

In accordance with our constitution, regional conferences were spon- 
sored during the winter months. Conducted by district vice-presidents with 
the usual high degree of cooperation from Central Labor Unions, the meet- 
ings proved to be very successful, worthwhile, and most infoi-mative to those 
who attended. 

This method of keeping in touch with our hundreds of affiliated unions, 
outlining to their representatives the many activities of the Massachusetts 



168 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

State Federation of Labor and discussing with them the many problems 
confronting trade unionists, has caused the affiliated unions to understand 
that united action is important and essential if common problems are to be 
solved to the satisfaction of Massachusetts trade unionists. An explanation 
of legislative matters before the Massachusetts Legislature at these confer- 
ences is usually the important part of the meeting. Such matters discussed 
during the meetings will be found in the report of the Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent. 

The response to requests for support of legislative matters, after ex- 
planations were made, was indeed gratifying. Union representatives in 
attendance seemed to realize the importance of their local support in con- 
nection with legislation sponsored and supported by the State Federation of 
Labor. 

Conferences were attended by President Nicholas P. Morrissey who 
always had a message of interest to trade unionists, and Secretary-Treasurer- 
Legislative Agent Kenneth I. Taylor, who outlined the legislative program 
and other matters. In addition, the conferences were attended by Bernard 
Weisman, Labor Information Director, New England Regional Office of the 
Social Security Board, who outlined the various phases of the Social Security 
Act, including unemployment insurance. George M. Fitzgerald, representing 
the Workers Education Bureau of America, also attended the meetings and 
outlined the purposes of that agency. 

The Executive Council is very grateful to Central Labor Unions, their 
officers and trade unionists throughout the Commonwealth for the splendid 
support and cooperation given, which contributed much to the success of 
thes© meetings. 

Conferences were held: 

February 17 at Boston 
February 19 at Springfield 
. February 26 at Fall River 
March 5 at Lawrence 

March 12 at Brockton 
March 19 at Worcester 
April 2 at Fitchburg 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SAVINGS BANK 
LIFE INSURANCE 

This is the fourth annual report of your Committee on Savings Bank Life 
Insurance and the third report since it was made a standing committee. 

At the 50th annual convention of the Massachusetts State Federation of 
Labor, held in Springfield in 1935, a Committee on Savings Bank Life Insurance 
was created for the purpose of "cooperating with the State Division of Sav- 
ings Bank Life Insurance in bringing the advantages and benefits of Savings 
Bank Life Insurance to the attention of all members of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Labor." Thereafter, the convention voted to continue this 
committee on Savings Bank Life Insurance as a "standing committee of the 
Massachusetts Federation of Labor with authority in the President to add to 
the committee and to fill such vacancies as may occur so that further prog- 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor ifiO 

ress may continue to be made in bringing the advantages of this system to 
the attention of our members." 

During the past year speakers from the State Division of Savings Bank 
Life Insurance have appeared before several local and central labor unions 
throughout the state, and at these meetings literature regarding Savings Bank 
Life Insurance has been distributed and many questions have been asked and 
answered. The amount of Savings Bank Life Insurance in force is increasing 
steadily, and it is the belief of your committee that this is due at least in 
part to a wider knowledge of the benefits of Savings Bank Life Insurance 
among organized workers throughout the state. 

As was reported by your committee to the 53rd annual convention, the 
proposal to limit the amount of Savings Bank Life Insurance which any one 
person could buy was defeated in the Legislature with the help of the Massa- 
chusetts Federation of Labor and of many central labor unions and local labor 
unions throughout the state. A resolution was adopted in the Legislature of 
1938 providing for a special commission to investigate the question whether 
or not there should be any such limitation. Hearings were held before the 
special commission on this subject during the fall and winter of 1938 and 1939, 
at which our Legislative Agent, Kenneth I. Taylor, with the approval of the 
Executive Council, recorded the State Federation against any proposal to 
limit the right of Massachusetts people to buy Savings Bank Life Insurance. 
Mr. Taylor again stated that if any such bill were enacted for that purpose 
it was his opinion that the organized workers of the Commonwealth would 
readily obtain more than a sufficient number of signatures to invoke a refer- 
endum to the people on the question of restricting their rights to buy Savings 
Bank Life Insurance. This referendum would, of course, suspend the operation 
of the law, and as Mr. Taylor pointed out would make Savings Bank Life 
Insurance a subject of widespread discussion in the 1940 campaign. 

The special commission reported in March 1939, six of the seven members 
recommending that there be no limitation, and that matter is therefore dis- 
posed of, at least for the present time, and probably for some time to come. 
The report of the commission (House Document, No. 2124 of 1939) states that 
"after giving fair and careful consideration to the arguments presented and 
the information obtained, the Commission is of the opinion that the Common- 
wealth should not by legislative enactment deprive any of its citizens pos- 
sessed of initiative and thrift of such benefits as Savings Bank Life Insurance 
may afford. Therefore the Commission does not recommend that a limitation 
be placed on the amount of Savings Bank Life Insurance which any individual 
may purchase." 

We have asked Secretary-Treasurer Taylor's permission to include the 
following letter in our report: 

Mr. Kenneth I. Taylor 

Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent 

Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 

11 Beacon Street, Boston 

Dear Kenneth: 

Before we get too far away from the events of the current legis- 
lative year, I want to thank the State Federation of Labor and the 
numerous local and central unions for their very great help to Sav- 



170 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

ings Bank Life Insurance. After full hearings the Recess Commis- 
sion, as you know, recommended no statutory limitation on the 
amount of insurance one may buy in the savings banks, and the 
"Omnibus Bill", on which the insurance interests set such great store 
and which proposed to change the fundamental structure of the Sav- 
ings Bank Life Insurance system was refused admission by the Rules 
Committee. I want to thank you personally also for your constant 
and invaluable help in preserving the right of the workers to buy 
their life insurance protection at the lowest possible cost. 

Yours very truly, 
SAVINGS BANK LIFE INSURANCE 
By (Signed) 

Judd Dewey 

Deputy Commissioner 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD U. FAULKNER, Federation of Teachers No. 230, Northampton 

SILAS N. LAPHAM, Barbers No. 385, Salem 

HARRY HOGAN, Carpenters No. 177, Springfield 

FRANCIS J. LYNCH, Holders No. 39, Taunton 

BERTINE P. WINCHESTER, Carpenters No. 885, Woburn 

WESLEY D. RICHARDS, Wire Workers No. 19859, Worcester 

THOMAS CHAPMAN, Barbers No. 284, Fitchburg 

ARTHUR J. KING, Machinists No. 481, Greenfield 

EDWARD M. FOLEY, Moving Picture Operators No. 397, Haverhill 

ABRAHAM PEARLSTEIN, Newspaper Chauffeurs, Distributors and Helpers 

No. 259, Boston 
CHRISTOPHER LANE, Hotel and Restaurant Employees No. 34, Boston 
NEIL MacKENZIE, Bricklayers at Large 

BERNARD F. SMITH, Boot and Shoe Workers No. 38, Brockton 
ROBERT E. MEEHAN, Machinists No. 634, Charlestown 
ARTHUR H. GREEN, Painters No. 563, Framingham 
EARL H. PALK, Plumbers No. 482, Gloucester 

ARTHUR A. ELLIOTT, Moving Picture Operators No. 425, Pittsfield 
COSTANZO PAGNANO, Granite Cutters, Quincy 
JOHN F. WADE, Typographical No. 51, Lawrence 
EDWARD C. ENO, Electrical Workers No. 588, Lowell 
WILLIAM A. NEALEY, Teamsters, Chauffeurs and Helpers No. 42, Lynn 
JOHN F. REARDON, Boot and Shoe Workers No. 40, Milford 
JOHN J. MANEY, Firemen and Oilers No. 3, Boston 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND INDUSTRIES 

Of the 20 departments within our state government there is no doubt that 
the Department of Labor and Industries is best known to Massachusetts trade 
unionists. Their every-day problems bring them and their representatives to 
the various divisions within the department more frequently than to any other 
department. Hundreds of trade unionists and their representatives have had 
occasion to use the service of the Arbitration and Conciliation Board. To many 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 171 

this branch of the Department of Labor and Industries is best known. Others 
have had many occasions to deal with the Division of Industrial Safety and 
the Minimum Wage Commission. 

It is noticeable that trade unionists have more confidence in the depart- 
ment and its various divisions than in the past. There was a time prior to 1935 
when representatives of unions and others were reluctant to place their prob- 
lem or destiny before the department or any of its divisions. The situation 
has changed. In recent years the department has proved to be most useful 
and valuable. 

The department is made up of several divisions, some of which may not 
be too well known to our membership. Therefore, it seems advisable to give 
a brief summary of the purpose and activities of the various divisions. 

Division of Industrial Safety 

This division carries on regular inspections of industrial establishments in 
its work for the enforcement of labor laws. Their system and method of 
administration is well known in the manufacturing and mercantile plants of 
the Commonwealth and compliance with the statutes in the course of this work 
is the usual experience. Through this means the protection provided for by 
statute is maintained. Compliance is secured with laws and regulations for 
the safeguarding of dangerous machinery. Adequate and suitable lighting is 
furnished in the work places. Rules and regulations for proper toilet and 
washing facilities are maintained; ventilation of industrial establishments 
carried on; pure water provided for drinking purposes and statutes enforced 
with regard to restricting the hours of employment for women and children. 

Checking up on the wage rates and classifications of employment fixed by 
the Commissioner of Labor and Industries under the authority of the statute 
is an integral part of this service. Cause of injury is studied in the investi- 
gation of accidents and diseases of occupation and means for the prevention 
of similar occurrences are based on this experience and followed in the work 
of accident prevention. 

This division is the largest within the Department of Labor and Indus- 
tries. During 1938 it is noteworthy that 75,456 inspections and visits were 
made at various places of employment for the purpose of protecting employees 
from accidents and occupational diseases and from violations of the many 
hundreds of other statutes which the Industrial Safety Division is responsible 
for administering. Such close scrutiny contributes to keeping working condi- 
tions within the Commonwealth on a high plane. Another service rendered 
by this division is the collection of money due wage earners from employers 
under the so-called non-payment of wage law. In this connection the division 
has had occasion to prosecute some employers for withholding wages and have 
caused the payment of wages to thousands of workers who otherwise might 
have been forced to either forego collecting wages due or resort to the courts 
and employ counsel to collect wages, which, in some instances, may have been 
smaller in amount than the cost of suing an employer. During the year 1938 
more than $50,000 was collected for unpaid employees through this division. 

The division also administers the well-known Chapter 461 of the Acts of 
1935 which provides for the pre-determination of wage rates to be paid 
mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs, and laborers on public works projects. The 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries sets the wage rates under the terms of 



172 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

the law and this division is charged with policing the various jobs to ascertain 
whether the law and the wages established by the Commission are being 
observed. Since the statute was enacted 4,873 contracts have been let, involving 
an approximate amount of $300,000,000. 

Board of Conciliation and Arbitration 

Massachusetts is relatively free from labor disputes and misunderstand- 
ings between employers and employees when comparison is made with the 
many other industrial states. It is true, of course, that this condition is 
partly due to the intelligence and ability of labor representatives and to the 
advanced understanding between many of our employers and the unions with 
which they do business. But it is also due to the service rendered by the Board 
of Conciliation and Arbitration in which agency the confidence of both employ- 
ers and employees has increased during the past few years. 

There was a time when workers were suspicious and possessed the feeling 
that they had less chance of getting an impartial hearing or fair decision 
than employers did. With the appointment of Commissioner James T. 
Moriarty Labor's attitude changed considerably. So did the personnel of the 
Arbitration and Conciliation Board. But we attribute the change mostly to 
the fact that a commissioner, trained in the trade union movement and devoted 
to the cause of wage earners, is in charge of the entire department. His out- 
look naturally caused many who may have been mentally honest but some- 
what reactionary in their views to accept his modern philosophy and sympa- 
thetic understanding of wage earners' problems. 

Labor disputes are fewer in industrial Massachusetts than in any other 
comparable state of our nation. No other industrial state enjoys a smaller 
number of lost man-days through strikes and other labor disputes. In 1938 
the Arbitration and Conciliation Board handled 311 cases submitted to arbitra- 
tion and a like number of cases involving conciliation. This type of service 
and the results obtained should be a good reason for Massachusetts being one 
of the best locations for industry and business to operate. 

The labor movement sincerely regrets that Associate Commissioner Ray- 
mond V. McNamara, the employer member of the board, decided to resign re- 
cently to take up the duties of postmaster of the City of Haverhill, Those who 
had ocassion to appear before the board in arbitration proceedings or during con- 
ferences when the board was attempting to adjust differences between em- 
ployers and employees will remember that Mr. McNamara, although an 
employer member, was alv/ays fair and impartial. His years of splendid 
service as a member of the board must be taken into consideration when an 
evaluation is made of the board's activities during the past few years. 

In his place Governor Saltonstall has appointed Lewis R. Hovey of Haver- 
hill. The State Federation of Labor withholds comment on the appointment, 
hopeful that he may possibly serve the Commonwealth and the interests of 
employers and employees as well as Mr. McNamara did. It would be tragic 
if a biased narrow-minded representative of employers held this important 
post — ^tragic because trade imions and their representatives might again lose 
confidence in the board which could result in increased unrest among wage 
earners who might prefer not to use the facilities of the Arbitration and Con- 
ciliation Board. 



i 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 173 

Division of Miniinum Wage 

The duties of the Minimum Wage Commission under the law comprise 
the following functions: investigating the wages of women and minors in occu- 
pations where there is reason to believe that the wages of a substantial number 
are below the requirement of healthful living; establishing wage boards to 
recommend rates for women and minors; entering wage board decrees based 
on the recommendations of the boards; inspecting to determine compliance 
with the decrees; reconvening wage boards to meet changes in the cost of 
living; and publishing the names of employers found violating its decrees. 

This division has become more active since 1937 as it now administers a 
law enacted at that time which allows the Commissioner to enforce the various 
wage decrees and seek relief in the courts if necessary. To establish a mini- 
mum wage decree is no longer simply a hollow gesture to those in need of a 
reasonable minimum wage. For years the Commissioner was without power 
to enforce the terms of a wage board's decision, but today an employer can be 
found guilty by a court for violating its terms as he can for violating any 
other statute that may be punishable by a fine or imprisonment. At present 
there are approximately 23 minimum wage decrees for that number of industries 
throughout Massachusetts, giving some assurance to women and minors who 
must rely on the Minimum Wage Commission that they will receive a minimum 
wage commensurate with the facts presented at a wage board hearing, vnth 
respect to comparable wages, living costs, et cetera. 

Division of Statistics 

The principal work of this division is the collection and publication of 
statistics of labor and manufacture; answering of inquiries relative to the 
industries of the Commonwealth; rates of wages, hours of labor and conditions 
of employment. Data compiled by this division is frequently used by private 
and governmental agencies. Trade unions and their officers should bear in 
mind that information prepared by the Division of Statistics is available to the 
public. They should use this source more often, the information and statistics 
may be useful in wage negotiations with employers, and for other purposes. 

Division of Standards 

Although the service rendered by this division is very valuable, it receives 
little public attention. Among other functions it safeguards the consuming 
public by inspecting scales, pumps and other types of weighing and measuring 
devices. The activities of this division give assurance to consumers that they 
are less apt to be exposed to merchants and dealers whose practice it is to give 
less than customers pay for. 

The Division of Necessaries of Life has been combined with the Division 
of Standards by the Legislature this year. This latter division provided pro- 
tection for the consuming public against unreasonable prices for commodities 
of common necessity, including rent of apartments and tenements. The au- 
thority of this division prevents unscrupulous merchants from taking advan- 
tage of unusual market conditions which might otherwise allow them to victim- 
ize consumers by profiteering methods. 

Division of Occupational Hygiene 

This division is established to protect employees in manufacturing and 
other establishments against occupational diseases. Recommendations are 



174 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

constantly made, after adequate investigations, to improve conditions in estab- 
lishments where employees are exposed to the hazards of occupational diseases. 
This service is most important and can be of immeasurable assistance in the 
war against dreaded occupational diseases to which too many workmen are 
exposed. 

Members of the Massachvisetts State Federation of Labor can well be 
proud of its selection of James T. Moriarty as a candidate for the position of 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries in 1935 when Governor James M. Curley 
filled the position. Though protests were made against the appointment of 
such an active trade unionist being chosen for the important position of Com- 
missioner, his activities during the past several years have proved conclusively 
that Jim Moriarty, the trade unionist, has actually rejuvenated the department 
and has restored it to usefulness. Today the opponents of 1935 are vigorous 
supporters. 

STATE LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION 

Delegates will recall that those attending the 53rd annual convention 
unanimously recorded themselves as dissatisfied with the administration of 
the State Labor Relations Act. Some had reason to believe that because of 
this protest the commission members might attend to their duties more con- 
scientiously and impartially, but unfortunately complaints continue to reach 
the Federation of Labor headquarters against the activities and decisions 
rendered by members of the commission. 

Earlier in the legislative session Governor Saltonstall recommended the 
abolition of the State Labor Relations Commission and the transfer of its 
duties and functions to the Commissioner of Labor and Industries and the 
courts. This was obviously an attempt to emasculate the Act, which was 
sponsored and enacted into law through the efforts of the State Federation of 
Labor. The Executive Council vigorously objected and actively opposed the 
Governor's recommendation. It was not the purpose of your officers to pre- 
serve the high-paid positions held by members of the commission, but rather 
to prevent the slicing up of the law which should mean so much to trade 
unionists. The legislative juggling being done with this particular recom- 
mendation indicates that no one seems to know just what to do with Governor 
Saltonstall's desire to wreck the law. Some lawmakers are reluctant to change 
the law contrary to the wishes of the State Federation of Labor. 

Experience since the time the State Labor Relations Act took effect re- 
veals that even a good law is of very little value without intelligent, courageous 
and efficient administration by those with the proper viewpoint. When officers 
and members hailed the enactment of this Act as a major victory little did 
they realize that it was going to retard rather than encourage collective 
bargaining. 

It is indeed tragic that the law for which the State Federation of Labor 
fought so vigorously is not serving the purpose for which it was originally 
intended. Most trade unionists are simply disgusted and with such a growing 
feeling against the commission and with the seeming loss of confidence in the 
ability of members of the commission to administer the law, there is doubt as 
to whether it will ever properly serve its purpose until changes are made. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 175 



FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT 

Commonly known as the Wage and Hours Law, the Fair Labor Stand- 
ards Act became effective on October 24, 1938. Essentially the law estab- 
lishes minimum wage standards and a maximum workweek, which must be 
observed by employers whose businesses are in interstate commerce. 

For the first year, or until October 24, 1939, the minimum wage is set 
at 25 cents per hour, and the maximum workweek is 44 hours, with pro- 
vision for payment of time and one-half for any hours worked beyond 44. 
On October 24th of this year, the minimum wage will automatically be 
increased to 30 cents and continue to increase during a seven-year period 
until it reaches 40 cents. As of October 24th, the workweek will drop from 
44 to 42 hours and again the following year to 40 hours. Ultimately, the 
law will provide minimum standards of 40 cents an hour for 40 hours of 
employment per week. 

Meanwhile, wage boards have been established under the terms of the 
law. Separate boards are appointed for different industries and are made 
up equally of representatives of employers, employees and the public. After 
being appointed, and after a thorough study has been made of conditions 
and wages paid within any specific industry, a wage board may recommend 
to the Administrator a minimum wage for the industry, which, if approved 
by him, becomes mandatory even if it exceeds the basic minimum rate of 
25 cents as the law provides. 

The enforcement of the Wages and Hours Law has been somewhat 
slow, mainly due to inadequate personnel. In New England a regional office 
was established as of the first of the year (1939) at 120 Boylston Street, 
Boston, under the direction of Regional Director Thomas H. Eliot of Cam- 
bridge. Unfortunately, the appropriation for this Division of the Depart- 
ment of Labor was so inadequate that the New England region has been 
operating with one supervising inspector and nine field inspectors, besides 
the regional director. 

With such a small corps of inspectors, whose duty it is to investigate 
complaints filed at the regional office or at the Washington office, too much 
time lapses between the time a complaint is filed and the time an inspector 
actually starts his investigation. Such a condition is conducive to difficult 
and slow enforcement; and, too, it gives chiseling employers an advantage 
and an opportunity to "cover up" which was never intended when the law- 
was enacted. It is hoped that with an increased appropriation recently 
approved by the Congress, the Division will assign more inspectors to the 
New England area so the law can be enforced as i: should be. 

Some of the first and few charges against employers for violating the 
Wages and Hours Law were filed in Massachusetts. The federal court, 
fortunately, has taken this new law seriously, which has resulted in a num- 
ber of prosecutions and convictions. Fines have been imposed upon con- 
victed employers, ranging from $500 to $7000. In addition, the court has 
ordered payment of back pay, which in one instance amounted to $2000. 

Up to July 1st, the following New England firms were prosecuted and 
convicted for having violated the Fair Labor Standards Act: Brown Con- 
tract Stitching Company, Lawrence, Mass., $1000 fine, and $500 fine on 
Nathan Brown; Gerber Shoe Company, Lawrence, Mass., $2000 fine; Bay 



176 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Shoe Company, Portland, Maine, $2500 fine; Arlington Shoe Manufacturing 
Company, Methuen, Mass., $4000 fine; Fisher Shoe Company, Hvidson, Mass., 
$5000 fine, and $2000 fine on Max Fisher; Ascutney Shoe Company, Hudson, 
Mass., $7000 fine; Kartiganer Hat Company, Milford, Mass. (Charles M. 
Hixon and Carroll D. Hixon, managers), pleaded guilty, sentence deferred 
to July 26; Sussex Hats, Inc., Holyoke, Mass., $1000 fine, and $500 fine on 
William Wolf. 

In all of the above cases, except the Sussex Hat case. Sections 6 and 7 
of the Act had been violated, which provide the minimum wage and maxi- 
mum hours per week. The Sussex Hats, Inc., was found guilty of failure 
to keep records in accordance with the Act. 

This record of convictions and the substantial fines imposed by the 
federal court, together with restitutions that were ordered by the court, 
will doubtless have its effect on other chiseling employers who have not been 
apprehended as yet. Many more employers are known to be violating the 
Wages and Hours Law. No doubt more prosecutions will be started soon 
against those who seem to think Congress was just fooling when it enacted 
a Wages and Hours Law — ^with teeth. 

WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION 

From the viewpoint of those in need of relief and the cities and towns 
which would otherwise have had increased welfare loads and taxes even 
higher than they are, the Works Progress Administration has served a most 
useful purpose. Without doubt this federal-sponsored work relief under- 
taking has saved many Massachusetts communities from bankruptcy, which 
would have been inevitable if those receiving WPA work relief were sup- 
ported locally through work relief or welfare. The following two months 
otfer an example of the help that federal work relief has been to Massa- 
chusetts cities and towns, the figures cited being all direct welfare cases: 

Direct 
Welfare Cases Cost 

March (1939) 73,882 $2,127,000 

April (1939) 69,294 1,787,000 

During the winter months approximately 125,000 workers were employed 
on about 700 so-called white collar projects and 1300 manual type projects. 
Since then the number has been reduced to a little less than 100,000. The 
following figures indicate the average number of workers employed on WPA 
projects from January 1938 to June 1939 inclusive: 

Average Average 

number number 

1038 employed 1938 employed 

January 81,000 November 130,000 

February 83,000 December 127,000 

March '. 95,000 

April 106,000 1939 

May 106,000 -January 124,000 

June 110,000 February 122,000 

July 117,000 March 122,000 

August 124,000 April 108,000 

September 128,000 May 97,000 

October 130,000 June 97,000 

It is estimated that 10,000 was the average number of skilled mechanics 
engaged on various projects at their respective trades. These workers and 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 177 

others received the prevailing hourly wage rate until Congress recently 
enacted new legislation providing that all workers must work 130 hours 
per month for the wages they receive, regardless of the rate of pay their 
occupation or trade may be worth in private industry. This increase of 
the number of hours that skilled mechanics must work without a correspond- 
ing increase of wages destroys the prevailing wage provision which has 
been in effect for several years. 

In 1938 slightly over $93,000,000 was disbursed in Massachusetts for sal- 
aries by the Works Progress Administration, and in 1939 approximately 
$39,000,000 has been disbursed from January to May, inclusive. This amount, 
which is a total of $132,000,000 for salaries since January, 1938, does not 
include the wages of administrative employers. Their salaries average about 
$190,000 monthly. 

The law which guides the administration of the Woi'ks Progress Ad- 
ministration provides that at least 95 per cent of those employed on WPA 
projects must be eligible for welfare. According to available figures, the 
Massachusetts division has 98.4 per cent. The law also requires that not 
more than 5 per cent of a state's appropriation can be used for adminis- 
trative expense. In this respect the Massachusetts division of the Works 
Progress Administration averages 2.49 per cent. 

This somewhat factual and statistical analysis of the WPA operations 
in Massachusetts would be incomplete if a few words were not said about 
Administrator John J. McDonough. The Massachusetts State Federation 
of Labor is indeed fortunate to have him in charge. His complete under- 
standing of and sympathy for our problems and needs has been most helpful 
and conducive to the friendly relationship that exists between his organiza- 
tion and ours. 

HOUSING 

In 1937 under the United States Housing Act there was appropriated 
the sum of $800,000,000 for the elimination of slums and the building of 
subsidized low-rent housing for families of low income. 

During the past year this entire sum has been earmarked to the various 
cities and towns throughout the nation. Legislation is now pending before 
Congress providing for an additional appropriation of $800,000,000. This 
bin was sponsored by Senator Robert F. Wagner of New York and has 
been adopted by the United States Senate by a vote of 48 to 16, with our 
two Senators from Massachusetts voting in the affirmative. The bill is be- 
fore the House Committee on Banking and Currency and is expected to 
be reported favorably. The enactment of this legislation will permit the 
present program to be progressively continued and expanded. 

Massachusetts' participation in public housing is represented in the 
following manner: 

Local Housing Authorities have been established in the cities shown 
below and have received earmarkings to date totalling $50,800,000. which 
sum represents 90 per cent of the total development cost of the projects. 
The local Housing Authorities are expected to raise the remaining ten per 
cent through local bond issues which will total $5,600,000 and which \vill 
in no way incur a liability upon the city in which the Authority is located. 



178 Joint Report of Executive Council and ufficers 

This sum added to the earmarkings of $50,800,000 from the United States 
Housing Authority will make a grand total of $56,400,000 to be spent for 
slum clearance and low-rent housing in Massachusetts under the present 
program. The allocations totalling $50,800,000 represent approximately 8 per 
cent of the entire federal appropriation. 

Cities in which Local 

Housing Authorities Earmarking Local 

have been Established Received Bond Issue 

Boston (9 projects) $39,000,000 $3,200,000 

Cambridge 4,500,000 500,000 

Chicopee 1,000,000 110,000 

Fall River (2 projects) 2,500,000 270.000 

Holyoke 1,800,000 200,000 

Lowell 2,700,000 300,000 

New Bedford (2 projects) 2,000,000 220,000 

Somerville 2,000,000 220,000 

Lawrence 1,500,000 160,000 

Worcester 3,800,000 420,000 

$50,800,000 $5,600,000 

The Boston, Fall River, Holyoke, Lowell and New Bedford Housing 
Authorities have signed loan contracts with the United States Housing 
Authority and money has been advanced to these local Authorities. Pre- 
liminary work in the other cities is being carried forward and is in various 
stages of progress. In Boston a contract has been awarded for the demoli- 
tion on the sites of the Charlestown and Mission Hill, Roxbury projects. 
Plans for the development of these two projects are now out for bids and 
the other projects will follow shortly. A project for colored people is to 
be constructed in the South End, Boston. 

During the past year the State of Massachusetts has been extremely 
active in the promotion of housing through the establishment of local Hous- 
ing Authorities and to date appears to be making most satisfactory progress. 
In anticipation of the new federal appropriation, ten more cities and towns 
are being assisted by the State Board of Housing through the making of 
surveys to enable these cities and towns to participate. 

Under the present program only a small percentage of the population 
of the Commonwealth will be accommodated, and these projects are located 
in the large industrial centers of our state. The State Housing Board in- 
troduced legislation in the present General Court to expand the housing 
program to the rural areas of the Commonwealth by permitting the State 
Board of Housing to act as an Authority in those cities and towns unable 
or unwilling to establish such an Authority. This bill, which was defeated 
and which the Board hopes to present again at the next session of the 
Legislature, was considered a new approach to the public housing program 
and it might be well to note that this type of approach has been included 
in the present pending national housing legislation which has been adopted 
by the Senate. 

Under the long-range objective of the United States Housing Authority 
it is expected that the housing program will continue until all under-privi- 
leged families are rehoused. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 179 



LABOR INJUNCTION 

This year witnessed a wave of reaction in many states. Some Legislatures 
have wrecked advantageous labor laws which were enacted during the past 
decade. This has occurred especially in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan 
and Minnesota. Here in Massachusetts the same sort of reaction has not set 
in as effectively, although the courts have done quite a "job" on existing laws. 

Prior to 1935 the common law as laid down in numerous cases regarding 
labor injunctions, was, generally, that any picket line or strike could be 
enjoined unless it was peacefully and legally conducted "for a legal purpose". 
The "legal purpose" had been defined to mean, to all intents and purposes, 
a demand only for wages and hours. Thus, if a closed or preferential shop 
were even part of the demand an injunction would issue against the picket 
line and strike. 

In 1935 the Legislature passed a local counterpart of the Federal Norris- 
LaGuardia Anti-Injunction Law. This law still allowed an injunction where 
there was not a peaceful and non-violent strike or picket line. It did, how- 
ever, put certain restrictions in the way of the issuance of an injunction, 
and these restrictions in no way took into consideration what the purpose of 
the strike or picket line might be. In addition, the act defined "labor dispute" 
very broadly so as to include differences regarding closed or preferential 
shops and other heretofore "illegal" purposes. Consequently it was believed 
by labor leaders and attorneys that the change would allow peacefully in- 
forming the public of a dispute no matter what differences of opinion had 
brought about that dispute. 

This belief was bolstered by the opinions of the United States Supreme 
Court in their interpretation of the Federal Norris-LaGuai'dia Act and the 
Wisconsin State Act. In three famous decisions the United States Supreme 
Court held that under these statutes there could be a picket line even though 
none of the employees of the person or corporation being picketed was a 
member of the union involved, and in two of these cases the sole purpose of 
a picket line was to obtain a closed shop. The United States Supreme Court 
opinion on the Wisconsin statute evidently overruled an advisory opinion 
issued by our Massachusetts Supreme Court in 1931 to the. effect that this 
type of statute was unconstitutional. And when in the Spring of 1938 
Superior Court Justice Lewis Goldberg handed down a similar decision, 
under our 1935 statute, denying an injunction against Local Union No. 618 
of the Meat Cutters, who were picketing a store for the purpose of getting 
a closed shop contract even though there were no employees of the store in 
the union, and when this action was followed by other superior court justices, 
notably Mr. Justice Greenhalge and Mr. Justice Hurley, the outlook appeared 
bright for those who believe that courts of law are not the proper places 
to settle labor disputes and who believe that the device of labor injunction 
had been grievously misused in the past. 

But on December 16, 1938 their hopes were destroyed. The Supreme 
Court of this Commonwealth reversed the decision of Mr. Justice Goldberg 
and held that the legislation of 1935 had not changed the law as to the 
granting of an injunction where the strike w^as for what used to be an 
"illegal purpose". In effect the Supreme Court declared that the Massachu- 
setts Legislature had wasted its time when it passed the Anti-Injunction 
Law of 1935 because that law meant practically nothing. The legal status 



180 Joint Report op Executive Council and Officers 

of the injunction was left where it had been prior to the passage of that 
Act; an injunction can be granted where a strike is either improperly con- 
ducted or where it is for what was an "illegal purpose" under the old common 
law. Our State Supreme Court overruled the lower court judges and found 
distinctions between the Massachusetts statute and the federal and Wisconsin 
statutes to get around the United States Supreme Court cases. 

One of those United States Supreme Court eases settled the question 
of the constitutionality of the Massachusetts Act of 1935 so that our Supreme 
Court did not declare the Act unconstitutional after it had intimated in an 
advisory opinion in 1931 that it would. But the interpretation of the Act 
has rendered it meaningless. Not merely did our Supreme Court declare 
that picket lines for a closed shop were still enjoinable, but the Court went 
on to emasculate certain procedural requirements that the Act made necessary 
before the granting of an injunction. For example, the Act of 1935 required 
that before an employer could get an injunction he would have to prove 
that the "public officers charged with the duty to protect" his property were 
unable or unwilling to "furnish adequate protection". In the case before the 
court the picket line had been very peaceful. There had been no complaints 
or arrests, but the Supreme Court stated that the injunction would be granted 
anyway precisely because the picketing had been peaceful. The actual 
words of the Court are: 

"The 'public officers charged with the duty to protect the com- 
plainant's property' are obviously unable to 'furnish adequate pro- 
tection' against acts which, so far as it appears, involve no breach 
of the peace or other violation of the criminal law warranting an 
arrest." 

A few months later another decision was handed down by our Supreme 
Court involving another local of the Butchers Union, which put a final nail 
in the coffin of Labor's hard-won rights. In that case there was a picket 
line, the purpose of which was to inform the public that an employer would 
not close his store Wednesday afternoons and Saturday nights. It was not 
to obtain a closed shop or any other hitherto "illegal purpose". Nevertheless 
the court held that because none of the employees in the store were in the 
picketing union or had a quarrel with the employer, that an injunction and 
bill for damages would be allowed. 

The State Federation drafted and presented to the General Court a 
new Peaceful Persuasion Law to attempt to remedy the damage done by 
these cases. At a stormy hearing in the State House it was pointed out that 
the Supreme Court had in effect told the Legislature that they had wasted 
their time in 1935, and that all labor asked was that the Legislature now 
do what it thought it had done in 1935. 

Shortly after the first case had come down, Governor Saltonstall was 
inaugurated, and in his message said: 

"I recommend for your study and consideration our laws with 
reference to collective bargaining and peaceful picketing. 

Our workers are entitled to the right to collective bargaining 
and peaceful picketing in any manner not accompanied by fraud, 
violence or deception ... 

I recommend for your study and consideration our anti-injunc- 
tion act so that its intent cannot be nullified." 

Apparently these words were never intended to be taken seriously but 
were merely being uttered for popular consumption; or maybe the Governor 
was shamelessly betrayed by his own lieutenants in the Legislature, for at 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 181 



the time of this writing the Republican Legislature has refused to pass the 
Fedei'ation's bill, and will apparently refuse to pass even a bare remnant 
of it as a suggested compromise. 

Since these decisions of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, lower court 
judges are carrying out a program of granting injunctions, frequently holding 
that controversies between unions and employers are not "labor disputes", 
despite the inclusive language of the 1935 Act. 

The experience of the past year with labor injunctions in Massachusetts 
is further proof of the fact that judges are the final lawmakers. People of 
the United States were educated on this subject by President Roosevelt when 
he advanced his plan to reform the United States Supreme Court. Although 
the plan was never enacted, it will probably go down in history as President 
Roosevelt's greatest victory because it produced a liberalization of the United 
States Supreme Court and a complete reversal of the court's position on 
matters of labor and social legislation. 



UNEMPLOYMENT 

In the early months of 1939, the American Federation of Labor estimated 
that there were 11,500,000 unemployed persons in the United States. The 
Alexander Hamilton Institute figured the number in February as 13,000,000. 
The National Industrial Conference Board guessed a little under 11,000,000. 
Meanwhile, despite propaganda as to the extent of relief expenditures. 
Department of Commerce figures reveal that the total of relief and social 
insurance payments amount to only 5 per cent of the index of national 
income payments, which is measured at 85 per cent against the peak 1929 
figure which is used as a base. This seems to be a very reasonable premium 
to pay during our economic convalescence. 

Everyone agrees the unemployment figure is dangerously high but the 
diagnosis as to cause or prescription as to cure is a subject for guesswork. 
Unfortunately, most of the guesses come from prejudiced sources. When 
one says it is due to too many babies and another claims it is due to .too 
few, or one says it is because of too much capital and others say it is due 
to lack of money, even a simpleton can decide that someone must be in error. 

We have a capitalistic system of economics. A lot of economists have 
written books as to what business is, w^hat makes it run and why. They 
even have explained the laws of economics. The trouble is that their "laws" 
seem to be self-violating as much as self-governing, which amounts to saying 
that the "laws" seem to be somewhat imaginary. For instance, we now 
have banks bursting with idle money — or practically so. We also have 
10,000,000 or 12,000,000 people looking for work. We also have a domestic 
market of which, as President Roosevelt has indicated, at least one-third are 
sorely in need of more and better food, clothing and housing. So, if the 
text books are right, we have all the elements for a big boom — idle capital 
available labor and enormous potential demand. Thus we have had all these 
ingredients for several years — ^just as we had them in the 'twenties. The 
ingredients, however, have failed to produce results. 

The big business spokesmen declare solemnly in a very grand tone that 
the reason for our dull, dragging depression or recession or slump is that 
business is too worried and handicapped to be able to function just now. 



182 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

The reasons vary. Sometimes it is blamed on discouraging taxes, sometimes 
on fear of what the New Deal is planning, sometimes they say it is due to 
harassment by the administration and often they blame it on labor unrest. 
But some of us can recall that these same experts boasted in the 'twenties 
that American business had discovered the secret of everlasting prosperity. 
None of the irritations they now complain of were present in those days but 
nevertheless with labor disorganized, taxes low, a quiescent and most friendly 
administration, they succeeded in exploding their own bubble in 1929. They 
had a three and a half year experimentation before the New Deal arrived, 
but more and more people became hungry, unhappy, fearful and desperate. 

Without pretending to be experts, we may observe first that the "enter- 
prise" on which competitive capitalism is supposed to thrive has vanished 
at least temporarily, either because there seems not a sufficient opportunity 
for profit or because capitalists today lack the initiative which is the chief 
excuse for deserving any profits. Under such circumstances it seems that 
we who believe in the capitalistic principles of private property and individual 
enterprise must courageously recognize that the system must be overhauled 
by those sincerely interested in its preservation and development. It is folly 
to talk of going back to the "good old days." Times have changed and 
conditions have changed so completely that the horse and buggy cannot travel 
fast enough to meet present needs. We must go forward at a fast rate to 
overtake the changed circumstances, and yet not so fast as to travel the 
wrong road. 

We must remember that Germany and Italy failed to solve the problems 
of modern times because they let themselves be led into a detour which took 
them into a virtual enslavement which has resulted in social and political 
barbarism. 

We need not be frenzied. The New Deal has given us a breathing spell 
in which to examine ourselves and study what we need and can do. Our 
present opinion is that we can solve our problems not by "appeasing" the 
incompetents who failed so miserably in the past but by improving the 
program initiated by the New Deal to correct past abuses and to promote 
a recovery to real economic, social and political well-being. These may be 
summarized as follows: 

1. Effective organization of workers into trade unions under intelligent 
leadership of their own choosing. 

2. Adjustment of wages and hours and conditions within industries 
and localities by collective bargaining. 

3. Progressive shortening of work week to increase employment oppor- 
tunities and purchasing power and to prevent the destruction of purchasing 
power by any displacement by technological improvements. 

4. Elimination of special privilege for the undeserving whether in 
business or politics so that the people may pay only for services rendered. 

5. A social insurance program through which the community may meet 
its need for providing for the unemployed whether old or young, able to 
work or disabled by illness or accident. 

6. Deflation of interest charges to a point which reflects its value in 
a time of huge idle reserves of capital. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 183 

7. Employment of idle workers in socially productive activities so that 
relief expenditures may bring physical and cultural dividends to all the 
people of the community. 

8. Defense of the institutions of our representative democracy by ade- 
quate "educational facilities, opportunity for all to live in decency, and ade- 
quate preparation to defend our political and economic institutions against 
encroachment from without or sabotage from within. 

9. A tax structui-e which will meet current expenditures based on 
ability to pay and designed to encourage constructive circulation of goods 
and services rather than to cripple the purchasing power of the wage earner. 

10. Willingness to work together with all people of good sense and 
good will, whether they live in anotTier state or nation, practice one religion 
or another, or belong to one race or another. 

Unemployment can be solved if we make our institutions fit our needs 
so that each may carry and earn his share in the circulation of goods and 
services on which our system depends. Meanwhile we can minimize its 
evils by providing adequate public employment for those now involuntarily 
idle. 

LABOR PRESS 

Massachusetts and in fact New England is without an adequate number 
of labor newspapers. If it were not for the Labor News, published at Worces- 
ter by Freeman Saltus, who is a member of the Worcester Typographical 
Union, we would not have any publication that could be considered as pub- 
lished in the interest of labor. 

This situation is not altogether chargeable to indifference among the mem- 
bers of organized labor even though it must be admitted that the support 
given to the present weekly publication or the others which have come and 
gone has been relatively limited. Newspapers are expensive to operate and 
require substantial advertising income. Unfriendly attitude by business plus 
a discreet "thumbs down" by banking interests provide scant lineage for the 
business office, especially if labor paper advertising departments avoid what 
might be termed "scab" sources. Only a courageous group with substantial 
financial resources could launch an adequate labor newspaper with any con- 
fidence that it could hold out long enough to build the sort of circulation 
desired. 

This does not mean that leaders of organized labor should adopt a defeat- 
ist attitude and abandon hope for an energetic competent labor press in New 
England. Rather we can prepare the ground for a labor press by cultivating 
the soil on which it can thrive. We can and should persistently tell the facts 
to our members so that they can realize the need for a labor press. Once our 
members know how much they need the day to day and week to week truth 
about trade unionism activities, economic developments, political maneuvering 
and social changes, they will create the demand out of which a real labor press 
can spring into being. 

It means dollars in the pay envelope or better hours or conditions on the 
job if workers know the truth. The whole Labor movement has been fettered 
by the treatment of labor news by the so-called free press, just as the forces 
of liberalism and progress have been slowed down by the misstatements, half- 



184 Joint Report op Executive Council and Oppicers 

truths, omissions or concealments by which a hostile and reactionary press 
has sought to deceive the people of America. 

The contrast between the headline news treatment given the Dies Com- 
mittee and the perfunctory reporting of the LaFoIlette revelations of big busi- 
ness sabotage of the civil liberties of their employees are the best gauge of the 
prejudice with which newspaper management perverts the freedom of the 
press. These criticisms are not directed at the reporters who cover the stories. 
If the strings which bind them were cut, we could read the real news. Un- 
fortunately, huge waste baskets are provided in newspaper offices for stories 
which are impolitic. 

Yet the newspapers which roar whenever their privilege of exploiting 
newsboys or reporters is threatened by legislation invoke the "freedom of the 
press" for mercenary motives more often than for honesty. They fear the 
freedom of the press will be destroyed if the Child Labor Amendment is 
adopted, and they prove their contempt for fair play by describing this 
amendment as the "Youth Control Amendment". 

Organized labor would not need a labor press if we could enjoy a fair 
press. Since the prospects of winning a fair press look no better today than 
they did one year or ten years ago, your officers must give thought to seeking 
a substitute. 

Possibly a weekly radio program or a bulletin service might be considered. 
The costs of either are substantial but with biennial sessions of the Legislature 
now in effect it is possible that we can do some experimenting during the 
next year. 

WORKERS EDUCATION 

During the past year the State Federation of Labor has continued its 
interest and participation in Workers Education projects. In the cities of 
Holyoke, Northampton and Springfield Mr. Fitzgerald of Amherst College has 
carried on forum work, cooperating with the central bodies and with the Work- 
ers Education Bureau. 

In the City of Boston workers education is being carried on by the Pastor 
of the Immaculate Conception Church in cooperation with a group of labor 
officials who met for sixteen consecutive weeks in discussing historic and con- 
temporary labor problems in the light of their religious background. This 
movement will continue in the City of Boston and seems to have a fine chance 
of expanding its program. Reverend Fathers Archdeacon Mellyn and Ryan 
have been active participants in this work and are extremely anxious to con- 
tinue again in the fall. 

We have cooperated in the building of the New England Town Hall radio 
program. However, this institution is quite willing for more full participation 
by our State Federation and the Federations of other New England states in 
bringing about a more complete coordination of workers education projects, 
suggesting a long run program where study and discussion groups will meet 
simultaneously with the radio forum program. 

Our officers have made numerous addresses before forums and various 
institutes discussing labor problems. More and more this activity upon our 
state officers renders a service that can greatly assist in bringing home to the 
various communities and to our members the correct position of organized 
labor. 



Massachusetts State Federation of Laijor 185 

UNION LABEL 

America is steadily growing union label-conscious in the same degree 
that it is becoming labor union-minded. Members of labor unions, their 
families and friends now fully realize that collective bargaining can be 
maintained only through collective buying of products that are union and 
the use of services that are unionized. When the "Blue Eagle" label of the 
NRA M'as at the peak of its popularity, consumers became label-minded. 
Immediately after the Supreme Court declared the National Industrial Re- 
covery Act invalid, the Union Label Trades Department of the American 
Federation of Labor seized the opportunity to crystallize this label-con- 
sciousness and directed it toward a demand for the union label, shop card 
and service button. 

Foreign wars have a tendency to create prejudice against the buying 
of products of aggressor nations. American business should take advantage 
of this "anti" sentiment against all "isms" that destroy democracies. The 
current campaigns against Nazi and Japanese goods are negative, but we 
can also make them positive by urging Americans to buy only products which 
bear the union label^ — the best guarantee that goods are American-made. 
Patriotic zeal for buying American products should reach its height in the 
next year. Labor unionists should not lose an opportunity to promote union 
wares in preference to foreign-made goods. 

Thus, from every standpoint, the union label is a symbol of those great 
principles which we desire to have established in our political, economic and 
spiritual life. In addition to the campaign for collective bargaining, higher 
wages and shorter hours, union label advocates can spread the gospel of 
collective buying and they can carry on an intensive campaign of a positive 
nature, by urging all consumers to buy only union label products and to 
patronize only union services, purely on the strength of the quality of these 
American products and the efficiency of the skilled services of American 
union workers. 

Every dollar spent for union label goods and union services is a vote 
for collective bargaining. We must press forward our just claims that union 
label buying is the only method by which America can recover from the 
present depression. Every purchase, regardless of how small it may be, 
is another stone in a paved road to permanent prosperity. 

Reduction in total payrolls and lack of employment are partlj'^ the results 
of our oviTi neglect to buy union label products and to patronize union services. 
When Japanese, Nazi and other foreign-made goods are purchased, we in- 
crease unemployment and reduce the total wages of American workers. The 
union label is the best guarantee that merchandise is made in America and 
it is the only assurance that those products are made under union conditions. 
The shop card and service button are likewise the only guarantee that the 
services performed in any establishment are union. 

The Union Label Catalog-Directory published by the Union Label Trades 
Department of the American Federation of Labor contains an up-to-date 
list of manufacturers of union label and union-made products and also a list 
of the larger industries and concerns that employ union services. Copies of 
the directory may be obtained by communicating with Secretary-Treasurer 



186 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

I. M. Ornburn. The Union Label Trades Department is the clearing house 
for American Federation of Labor unions which have adopted union labels, 
shop cards, or buttons to designate their products and services. These official 
emblems are adopted to assure the public which products are manufactured 
and which services are performed under the standards of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

Union label boosters will win a great victory for all American workers. 
Their cause represents better standards for workers; abolition of sweatshop 
conditions and child labor; buying our own products to maintain our Amer- 
ican standards; sanitary conditions for workers who manufacture the prod- 
ucts. The union label stands for the highest ideals of mankind as set forth 
in the Declaration of Independence and expressed in these words, "all men 
are created equal and endowed with certain inalienable rights. Among these 
are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness!" 




f 



I 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 187 



GIBBS, DEAN & COMPANY 
■20 Pemberton Square 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Edward Gibbs, Jr. 

Certified Public Accountant 

Willis T. Dean 

July 19, 1939 
Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 
11 Beacon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen : 

As requested, we have made an audit of your books and records for the 
year ended June 30, 1939. 

We herewith submit our repoi-t together with financial statements and 
supporting schedules, as follows: 

Exhibit A — Statement of Condition 

Exhibit B — Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Exhibit C — Statement of William P. Connery, Jr., Memorial Fund 

Exhibit D — ^Standing of Affiliated Organizations 

Schedule I— Statement of Cash June 30, 1938— June 30, 1939 

All cash funds were reconciled with the cash book and further verified 
by direct correspondence with the banks. All cancelled checks returned by 
the bank were examined and compared with the entries in the cash book, and 
with the vouchers. All receipts were checked and found properly deposited. 

A list of affiliated organizations was taken. There appear to be 128 
organizations with dues in arrears, amounting to $1,035.09. A reserve is 
provided for this item until collected, on the Statement of Condition. 

The Executive Council's Minute Book was examined for authorization 
of expenditures and the records were found to be in order. The Treasurer's 
bond was examined and found to be in order. The books and records were 
in good order and very well kept. 

The Net Worth of the organization shows an increase of $312.38, as 
compared with last year: 

Net Worth June 30, 1939 $20,088.59 

Net Worth June 30, 1938 19,776.21 

Increase $ 312.38 

If there is any further information desired coming within the scope of 
our examination, we shall be pleased to furnish it upon request. 

Yours very truly, 

GIBBS, DEAN & COMPANY 

By: Edward Gibbs, Jr. 

Certified Public Accountant 



188 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Exhibit A 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 

Statement of Condition 
June 30, 1939 

ASSETS 

Cash (Schedule I) $20,125.09 

Dues in Arrears from Affiliated Organizations 1,035.09 

Loans to Affiliated Organizations 394.00 

Due from Year Book Advertisers 65.00 

$21,619.18 

LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH 

Dues in Advance $ 406.90 

Reserve for Dues in Arrears 1,035.09 

Social Security Taxes Payable < 88.60 

Net Worth — Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 20,088.59 

$21,619.18 
Exhibit B 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1939 

General Year 

Funds Book Total 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1938 (Schedule I).... $19,155.26 $508.00 $19,663.26 

CASH RECEIPTS 

Dues Collected— Affiliated Organizations $14,053.89 $14,053.89 

American Federation of Labor — Office Ex- 
pense 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Interest — Savings Bank 312.54 312.54 

Telephone Refunds 20.69 20.69 

Label Committee Refund 6.15 6.15 

Advertising— Year Book 4,730.00 4,730.00 

Total Cash to be Accounted for.... $35,948.53 $5,238.00 $41,186.53 

CASH DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries : Secretary-Treasurer Kenneth I. 

Taylor $ 4,160.00 $ 4,160.00 

Office Stenographers 3,473.57 3,473.57 

Year Book $2,035.00 2,035.00 

Printing 1,642.97 425.00 2,067.97 

Rent and Light 1,870.81 1,870.81 



Massachusetts State Federation of Labor 189 

Traveling Expense 1,054.00 1,054.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 831.97 831.97 

Non-Partisan Political Committee 800.00 800.00 

Furniture and Equipment 744.27 744.27 

Postage 644.17 50.00 694.17 

Expenses, Executive Council Meetings 674.30 674.30 

Social Security Taxes 578.63 578.63 

State Convention Expenses 494.71 494.71 

General Office Expense 456.07 456.07 

Audit and Legal Expenses 375.00 375.00 

Office Supplies 336.42 9.85 346.27 

Boston Central Labor Union — -Convention 

Contribution 300.00 300.00 

Advertising and Notices 34.70 34.70 

Bond 30.00 30.00 

Flowers 30.00 30.00 

Dues — American Federation of Labor 10.00 10.00 

Total Cash Disbursements $18,541.59 $2,519.85 .$21,061.44 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1939 (Schedule I) $17,406.94 $2,718.15 $20,125.09 

Exhibit C 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 

Statement of William P. Connery, Jr., Memorial Fund 

July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1939 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1938 $ 1,427.25 

CASH RECEIPTS 

Donations to Fund 485.62 

Interest — Savings Bank 10.05 

Total Cash to be Accounted for $ 1,922.92 

CASH DISBURSEMENTS 

Postage $ 27.00 



Cash Balance, June 30, 1939 $1,895.92 

Cash Balance June 30, 1939: 

Cash on Hand $ 10.00 

Checking Account 

First National Bank, Boston 875.87 

Savings Account 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Book 1098754 1,010.05 

$ 1,895.92 



190 Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Exhibit D 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 

Standing of Affiliated Organizations 
As of June 30, 1939 

1939 1938 

Affiliated Organizations beginning of period 584 547 

Affiliated Organizations accepted during period 84 128 

668 675 

Affiliated Organizations suspended during period 37 91 

Affiliated Organizations at end of year 631 584 

Affiliated Organizations with Dues in Arrears 128 154 

Schedule I 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR 
Statement of Cash 

June 30, 1938 June 30, 1939 

Cash on Hand $ 49.70 $ 58.11 

First National Bank — Boston, Checking Regular 

Account 1,883.05 1,911.20 

First National Bank — Boston, Checking Year 

Book Account 508.00 2,718.15 

Franklin Savings Bank, Book No. 191431 4,033.33 4,114.39 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank, Book No. 982541 3,166.'98 3,230.62 

Warren Institution for Savings, Book No. 139313 3,595.10 3,030.00 

Suffolk Savings Bank, Book No. 555237 2,500.00 2,537.62 

Home Savings Bank, Book No. 404189 3,927.10 2,525.00 

$19,663.26 $20,125.09 



INDEX 

Addresses : Page 

Arkin, Loon, Representative, Jewish Lal)or Committee 50,51 

Barry, John Ij., President, New Ilamiisliire State Federation of Labor 44 

Carroll, John, Chairman, Massachusetts Housing Board 51,52 

Clydesdale, David, Representative, International Association of Machinists.. 28,29 
Uelaney, Dennis W., Massachusetts Administrator, Works Progress 

Administration 41 

Diehl, Ralph, Representative, Union Labor Life Insurance Company 10.3 

Eliot, Thomas, New England Regional Director, Wages and Hours Division 29 

Fenton, Francis P., Director of Organization, American Federation of Labor.. :;'.t-41 

Fox, C. M.,, President, United Textile Worlvers of America 20 

Goggin, Daniel J., Chairman of Arrangements Committee, Boston Central 

Labor LTnion 3 

Hines, Reverend Father George A 3 

Kearney, John J., Vice-President, Boston Central Labor Union 3, 4 

Kirkpatrick, Ray C, Assistant on Labor Relations. Public Works 

Administration 14, 15 

McDouoiigli, John J., New England Regional Director, Works Progress 

Administration , 17 

Moriarty, James T., Commissioner, Department of Labor and Industries .... 27, 2S 
Morrissey, Nicholas P., President, Massachusetts State Federation of Labor.... 4, 5 
Murphy, John J., New England Representative, American Federation of Labor 23, 24 

Murray, George,, Acting Mayor, City of Boston 3, 4 

Ornburn, I. M., Secretary-Treasurer, Union Label Trades Department, 

American Federation of Labor 22, 23 

Pearson, John, Director, New England Regional Office, Social Security Board.. 15. 1(5 

Saltonstall, Leverett, Governor, Commonwealth of Massachusetts 24-26 

Spencer, Edna L., Chairman, Massachusetts Committee for Repeal of Plan E.. 52, 53 
Vinton, Warren Jay, Chief Economist and Planning Officer, United States 

Housing Authority 37-3!) 

Watt, Robert J., Workers' Representative, International Labor Office IS, 19 

Committees, Appointment of 11-13, 20, 44 

Communications and telegrams : 

Dunton, Charles O., Secretary, Maine State Federation of Labor 33 

Gatelee, John F 13 

Green, William, President,, American Federation of Labor 17 

Gregg, John P., Secretary, Committee for Reciprocity Information (Ml 

Howe, Horace E., President, Portland (Maine) Central Labor LTnion 42 

Lodge, Henry Cabot, Jr., United States Senator, Massachusetts 13 

Molders., Local Union No. 5, Worcester 'M 

Onoroto, Emidio, President, Federal Labor Union No. 21928, South Barre IS 

Rickert, T. A., President, United Garment Workers of America 13 

Valente, Anthony, Organizer, American /Federation of Labor 18 

Van Horn, R. E., President, Cigar Makers International Union of America 20 

Van Vaerenewyck,, John, Organizer, American Federation of Labor 90 

Convention Call 5 

Convention, daily sessions 

Monday, August 7th 3-21 

Tuesday, August 8th 22-26 

Wednesday, August 9th 27-42 

Thursday, August 10th 43-70 

Friday, August 11th 71-104 



INDEX (continued) 

Page 
Credentials, Report of committee 20, 21, 41, 42, 103 

Delegates, Roll call of 5-11 

Grievances, Report of committee 103 

Oath., Administration of 11 

Officers, Election of 103, 104 

Officers, Nomination of 34-37 

Officers' Report, Report of committee 61, 02, 91 

Order of Business 16, 17 

Per Capita, Constitutional amendment providing for minimum 65 

Resolutions: 

No. 1. Seniority in Bridgetending Service 43 

No. 2. Change of Time of Annual Convention 63, 64 

No. 3. Restoration of Prevailing Wage Provision in Emergency Relief Bill 79 

No. 4. Opposition to Reciprocal Trade Pacts '. 43,44 

No. 5. Endorsement of Candidates for Political Office 64, 65 

No. 6. Election of Officers by Referendum 63 

No. 7. Appointment of Committees 62 

No. 8. Commendation for President Roosevelt 80 

No. 9. Disapproval of Remarks Directed at Vice-President John N. Garner. .78, 79, 80 
No. 10. Governor Saltonstall's Recommendation to Close State Tfeachers Colleges 98-100 
No. 11. Purchase of Milk and Dairy Products From Firms Employing Union 

Members 66,, 67 

No. 12. Purchase of Milk Delivered by Members of Organized Labor 43 

No. 13. Legislation to Prevent Army and Navy Officials from iControlling Civilian 

Activities 100 

No. 14. Third Term for President Roosevelt 80, 81 

No. 15. Leopold Morse Company Unfair to Organized Labor 55 

No. 16. Payroll Tax 84, 85 

No. 17. Convention Headquarters Must Be Thoroughly Union 55, 56 

No. 18. State Fund for Workmen's Compensation 73-75 

No. 19. Annual Sessions of Massachusetts Legislature 96,97 

No. 20. Abolition of Private Control of Nation's Credit 85 

No. 21. Two Per Cent Gross Income Tax 85 

No. 22. Education-Publications Department 92 

No. 23. Gold Standard and Regulation of the Dollar 82 

No. 24. Migration of Massachusetts Industries 66 

No. 25. Establishment of a Labor Party 84 

No. 26. Two Per Cent Universal Income Tax 85 

No. 27. Decision of Maine Public Utilities Commission 46-48 

No. 28. Publication of Telephone Directory More Frequently 72, 73 

No. 29. Union Label of United Hatters 56, 57 

No. 30. Union Label of United Hatters 57 

No. 31. Leopold Morse Company's Attitude Toward Organized Labor 45,46 

No. 32. Endorsement of WPA and Prevailing Wage 95 

No. 33. Repeal of So-Called Hatch Law 96 

No. 34. Wages and Working Conditions in Mental Health Hospitals 81, 82 

No. .35. Wooden Beer Barrels Made by Members of Coopers Union 57 

No. 36. Boston Parking Regulations 54, 55 

No. 37. Weekly Wage Guarantee for Laundry Workers 94,95 

No. 38. State Wages and Hours Law 101 

No. 39. Referendum in 1940 on State Fund for Workmen's Compensation 75 

No. 40. General Welfare Act 85, 86 

No. 41. Support of Union Labor Life Insurance 68, 69 

No. 42. Use of North German Lloyd Line by Ancient and Honorable Artillery 

Company 71, 72 



INDEX (continued) 

Kosolutioiis (Continued) : l'ag(; 

No. 4.3. Atlantic and Pacific Tea Comimii.v Unfair to OrKani'/od Laljor 58-61 

No. 44. Reduction of the Number of Taxical)s Opcratinfjr in the City of Hostoii.r.7, 6.S 

No. 45. Support of Adequate Tenure Law for Teachers 72 

No. 46. Condemnation of Religious Intolerance, Hatred and Persecution "fi 

No. 47. Condemnation of Nazism and Fascism 7t; 

No. 48. Support of British Labor Movement's Attitude Toward Jews 70 

No. 49. Adequate Work Relief Legislation 05, 06 

No. 50. Rest Room for Laundry Worlvcrs 95 

No. 51. (Made part of Resolution No. 91) 101 

No. 52. Condemnation of Governor Saltonstall's Administration 29-3.3 

No. 53. Colonial Press Still Unfair to Organized Labor 65, 66 

No. 54. Support of Allied Printing Trades Label 61 

No. 55. Endorsement of Campaign Against R. R. Donnelly Company of Chicago. 57, .58 

No. 56. Restoration of Employment Opportunities 94 

No. 57. Purchase of Text Books Bearing the Allied Printing Trades Label .58 

No. 58. Demand Resignation of Patrick "Packy" Sullivan From State Labor Re- 
lations Commission 82, 83 

No. 59. Support of Newspaper Advertising 71 

No. 60. Defeat of Federal Lending Bill 90 

No. 61. Condemnation of Undemocratic Tactics and Forms of Government 70, 77 

No. 62. Legislation to Prevent Army and Navy Officials From Controlling Civilian 

Activities 98 

No. 63. Tax on Interest from Mortgages 86 

No. 64. Retail Sales Tax ' 86, 87 

No. 65. Disapproval of Bata Shoe Company 84 

No. 66. State University 92 

No. 67. Allegiance to the American Federation of Labor 97 

No. 68. Establishment of a Labor Newspaper 71 

No. 69. Use of Radio by Executive Council 69, 70 

No. 70. Tax on Chain Stores 87 

No. 71. Study of Problem of Taxation 87, 88 

No. 72. Two-Week Summer Trade Union College 93, 94 

No. 73. Condemnation of Attempts to Reduce Wages of Teachers and Others in 

Public Employment 72 

No. 74. Research and Statistical Department 92. 9.'^ 

No. 75. Failure to Retain James P. Meehan in Division of TTneniployment 

Compensation 49, 50 

No. 76. Merit Rating Amendment to Unemployment Compensation Act 48, 49 

No. 77. Commendation for Editor Saltns of Worcester Labor News 96 

No. 78. Two Men on Trucks in Congested Areas 68 

No. 79. Support of Barbers Union Shop Card 98 

No. 80. Safety Code for Window Cleaners 98 

No. 81. Emasculation of Labor Relations Act 33 

No. 82. Appreciation of Union-Made Products Donated 58 

No. S3. Adequate Appropriation for Administration of Labor Laws 93 

No. 84. Redistricting of Senatorial District Affecting Ward 3, Springfield 83 

No. 85. Resolution of Thanks 101. 102 

No. 86. Firms Recommended by Office Equipment Mechanics 83, 84 

No. 87. Salaries of Members of Committee on Credentials and Others 102 

No. 88. Condemnation of Un-American Practices and Forms of Government 77, 78 

No. 89. Study of Problem of Taxation 88-90 

No. 90. State Teachers Colleges 09, 100 

No. 91. In Memory of Deceased Members 101 

Rules, Report of committee 16, 17 

Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent, Report of committee 53, .>t 

South Barre Strike, Report of committee 90. 91 

Tellers, Appointment of 91 

Union Label Gifts, Winners of , . , , . , 81 



INDEX (continued) 

Joint Report of Executive Council and Officers 

Page 
Affiliations 155-157 

American Federation of Labor Delegate, Report of 123, 124 

Conventions 159 

Pair Labor Standards Act 175, 176 

Financial statement (report of certified public accountant). 187-190 

Housing 177, 178 

Introduction 107 

Labor and Industries, Department of 170-174 

Labor Injunction .179-181 

Labor Press 183, 184 

Per Capita Tax 157-159 

President, Report of ' 108-112 

Regional Conferences 167, 168 

Savings Bank Life Insurance, Report of Committee 168-170 

Secretary-Treasurer-Legislative Agent, Report of 125-154 

Bills favored by Labor and enacted Into lave 126-133 

Bills opposed by Labor and defeated 133-130 

Bills favored by Labor and defeated 137-154 

Social Security 105-167 

State Labor Relations Commission 174 

Unemployment 181-183 

Unemployment Compensation 161-164 

Union Label 185, 186 

Vice-Presidents, Reports of 113-122 

William P. Connery, Jr., Memorial Fund, Report of Committee 159-161 

Workers Education 184 

Works Progress Administration 176, 177 



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